PRI's The World

Weekdays 7-8p.m.
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

PRI's The World® is your world revealed. It's about the events, trends, and personal tales that connect us around the globe. Marco Werman hosts an hour of surprising angles, unexpected insights, and engaging voices to illuminate what's going on in the world, and why it matters to you.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinta Arden introduced a new bill to parliament on Friday that aims to further tighten gun laws, as the country marks six months since the mass shooting in Christchurch that killed 51 Muslim worshippers.

This is New Zealand's second set of gun reforms after weak firearm laws were identified as a key reason why a suspected white supremacist was able to own semi-automatic weapons that he used to kill people gathered at two mosques for Friday prayers on March 15. A mandatory nationwide gun buy-back program was part of the reforms.

A storm system threatening the Bahamas with more heavy downpours and strong winds on Friday hampered the search for some 1,300 people missing in the wake of the worst hurricane in the nation's history and a massive humanitarian operation to help survivors.

The unnamed system, which had the potential of becoming a tropical storm, could drop up to 6 inches of rain through Sunday in some areas that were inundated nearly two weeks ago by Hurricane Dorian, forecasters said.

For many Israelis, this election is all about Bibi

Sep 13, 2019

Israelis are heading back to the polls for the second time this year, and whether they love him, can’t stand him or happen to be indifferent about Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, this election is all about “Bibi,” as he’s known. 

On Friday, the latest polling numbers found Netanyahu’s right-wing Likud party and the centrist Kahol Lavan, the “Blue and White” party, locked in a dead heat. Each party was projected to win 32 seats in Israel’s parliament, the Knesset. 

Canada’s campaign for federal parliamentary elections officially began Wednesday. Voting will take place on Oct. 21 in what is expected to be a close contest between the parties led by incumbent Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Conservative leader Andrew Scheer. 

How disease is used to deny entry at US borders

Sep 11, 2019

A Federal Court in San Diego will hear a lawsuit on September 20th brought by the American Civil Liberties Union against the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement on the issue of family separation at the US-Mexico border.

In Russia's municipal elections on Sunday, President Vladimir Putin's party, United Russia, was dealt a significant blow.

The results were part of a "smart vote" strategy orchestrated by the opposition. At the suggestion of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, many anti-Putin voters decided to vote for anyone other than a candidate from Putin's party, even candidates that voters might otherwise find distasteful.

"This was an experiment, and in those cities and regions where it was implemented for the first time, it worked very very well," Navalny said.

The Indian Space Research Organization is speeding toward history on Friday as its second lunar mission, Chandrayaan-2, is expected to touch down near the moon’s south pole.

If successful, Chandrayaan-2’s landing site would be the southernmost spot on the moon to be visited by any spacecraft, and make India the fourth country to complete a landing on the moon. 

One month after crackdown, protests continue in Kashmir

Sep 5, 2019

A month after India withdrew contested Kashmir's autonomy, locked it down with thousands of additional troops and made mass arrests, residents are resisting attempts by authorities to show some signs of normalcy returning in the Muslim-majority valley.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi revoked special rights for Jammu and Kashmir state on Aug. 5, striking down long-standing constitutional provisions for the Himalayan region, which is also claimed by neighboring Pakistan.

On a recent Wednesday, Noam Shuster-Eliassi strolled around the tiny village in Israel where she grew up, Neve Shalom or "Oasis of Peace," wishing goodbye to her neighbors. The Israeli comedian was heading to Harvard University in just a few days for a fellowship at the Divinity School. There, she will be writing an hourlong comedy show in Hebrew, English and Arabic. She is calling it, “Coexistence My Ass.”

The four strangers didn't speak to each other as they unloaded their luggage from a taxi in the early morning August light at the end of a road in rural Champlain, New York. 

“You speak English?” a bearded Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer a few yards away asked to nods from three men. And to the woman: “Madame, parlez-vous français?”

Then, he began to reel off a short speech he and his colleagues repeat many times a day whenever someone arrives at the dead end of Roxham Road to cross into Quebec, Canada. 

Oct. 1 will mark 70 years since Chairman Mao Zedong declared victory over his anti-communist enemies and founded the modern Chinese nation.

His rivals, a US-backed army known as the Kuomintang (KMT), mostly fled seaward. They landed in Taiwan, where their successors still run the island republic — or in Beijing’s view, a renegade province. Others escaped to Hong Kong.

Weak rainfall is unlikely to extinguish a record number of fires raging in Brazil's Amazon anytime soon, with pockets of precipitation through Sept. 10 expected to bring only isolated relief, according to weather data and two experts.

The world's largest tropical rainforest is being ravaged as the number of blazes recorded across the Brazilian Amazon has risen 79% this year through Aug. 25, according to the country's space research agency.

The Ducasse d'Ath begins Friday. It's a centuries-old festival featuring large puppets, giants and floats that parade through the streets of Ath, a village of 30,000 in the French-speaking region of Wallonia in Belgium. The exact purpose of the celebration has changed over time, but it celebrates the biblical story about David's triumph over Goliath. 

Amid growing global condemnation, Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro said on Friday he may mobilize the army to help combat a record number of fires sweeping through the Amazon rainforest.

The Trump administration said it was "deeply concerned" about the wildfires and European leaders ratcheted up criticism of Brazil's handling of the crisis, which now looks set to be discussed at a summit of G7 leaders in France this weekend.

The Trump administration on Wednesday unveiled a rule that allows officials to detain migrant families indefinitely while judges consider whether to grant them asylum in the United States, abolishing a previous 20-day limit. 

The rule, which is certain to draw a legal challenge, would replace a 1997 court settlement that limits the amount of time US immigration authorities can detain migrant children. That agreement is generally interpreted as meaning families must be released within 20 days.

For the first time, scientists have found a treatment for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis — a disease that, so far, was near-impossible to cure. In a groundbreaking development, the results show that the drugs will save most patients’ lives in a few months.

Tuberculosis is the deadliest infectious disease in the world, killing about 1.6 million people globally in 2017, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), and drug-resistant strains make the disease even harder to contain.

Why are so many languages spoken in some places and so few in others?

Aug 15, 2019

People across the world describe their thoughts and emotions, share experiences and spread ideas through the use of thousands of distinct languages. These languages form a fundamental part of our humanity. They determine whom we communicate with and how we express ourselves.

On Monday, US Citizenship and Immigration Services announced changes to the application of the “likely to become a public charge,” or LPC, clause that would make it more difficult for legal immigrants who seek public assistance to qualify for permanent residence and citizenship.

Trying to justify the new rule, acting USCIS director Ken Cuccinelli said that the United States should only admit immigrants like his Irish and Italian ancestors who “came up from their bootstraps.”

A few months ago, Quinn Nystrom responded to a post on Facebook and decided to try something she had never done before: join a caravan to Canada. The reason she left her home in central Minnesota on the morning of May 3 for a five-hour drive north was to buy insulin from a pharmacy across the border in Fort Frances, Ontario.

St. Sucia is not your typical saint. From immigration and work-life balance to dating and sex, nothing is too taboo for this rebel to tackle. 

But St. Sucia doesn't live in a chapel or a cathedral. She is the creation of San Antonio-based Latinx artist and illustrator Isabel Ann Castro.

“I told them that they can’t be asking the Virgin or Jesus Christ to help them out with their cochina problems. They needed a saint to understand. A saint that was a ‘dirty girl’ too.”

Isabel Ann Castro, artist

There has been no let-up in violence in Afghanistan even though the Taliban and the United States appear close to a pact for US troops to withdraw in exchange for a Taliban promise that Afghanistan will not be used as a base for international terrorism.

This week, US Special Envoy Zalmay Khalilzad wrapped up the latest round of meetings with the Taliban in Doha in the Gulf state of Qatar. Khalilzad was optimistic about the talks and tweeted that they have "made excellent progress."

Kadiatou* was 14 when she fled her uncle’s home in Guinea, West Africa. She knew she had to leave when he began making arrangements for her to marry an older man.

Kadiatou, whose parents and younger sister had died, turned to a school friend for help. Her friend gave her a little money, and one day, she packed some belongings and began the long trek across Mali through Mauritania, Algeria and Libya before boarding a boat to Italy. 

It's been presented as a terrifying, dystopian nightmare straight out of science fiction: a system that would allow the Chinese government to surveil all citizens and assign them a score that would impact all aspects of their lives. It sounds frightening. But, as it turns out, much of the Western media narrative on China's social credit system has been outright false.

As part of a collaboration between Wired magazine and The World, we take a look at what the system actually looks like, and how it really works.

When you scroll through social media feeds in Turkey today, you’ll likely come across posts sowing doubt and confusion about vaccines: “They’re injecting children with the genes of pigs and monkeys with vaccines!” “The vaccines that America and other governments sell to Turkey are not the same as the ones they use themselves.” “The children that get vaccinated

The soundtrack of Puerto Rico's protests

Jul 24, 2019

Historic protests have rocked Puerto Rico, and demonstrators have made themselves heard in San Juan, demanding that Gov. Ricardo Rosselló resign. Some activists have shown up by motorcycle, kayak, horseback — even underwater.

Then, there's the music.

Puerto Rican singer iLe is one of many high-profile artists who've spoken out in support of the protesters in Puerto Rico. And one of her songs titled “Afilando Los Cuchillos,” or “Sharpening the Knives,” is part of the soundtrack for Puerto Rico’s political crisis.

Roman Sabal served in the United States Marine Corps for six years, and in the US Army Reserves for several more. But on Monday, border officials at San Ysidro denied Sabal entry to the US for a scheduled citizenship interview.

Sabal lived in the US for more than a decade and joined the Marines in 1987, eager to serve the US. In 2008, he returned to Belize for a visit and while he was gone, a judge ordered him to be deported at a court hearing he was not aware of because he was not in the US. 

Somali Canadian journalist Hodan Nalayeh loved to share positive stories about her homeland and celebrate its beauty.

Roundups of undocumented immigrant families conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents could start Sunday in 10 US cities, fulfilling a hardline immigration stance from US President Donald Trump, the New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources including two current and one former homeland security officials.

One diplomat has been entrusted with the task of bringing warring sides in Yemen together. United Nations Special Envoy to Yemen Martin Griffiths has made progress where others have not.

In December, people in Yemen — and the world's diplomatic community — were surprised that a diplomatic meeting in Stockholm arranged by Griffiths led to action steps, including a drawback from a likely battle over the Red Sea port Hodeidah.

President Donald Trump had good reason to welcome Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, the emir of Qatar, to the White House.

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