Radio

December 17, 1861: Henry Ruffner Died

Dec 17, 2018
Ruffner was ahead of his time in arguing for a free public education system.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / e-WV

Henry Ruffner died in Malden on December 17, 1861, at the age of 71. He had been one of western Virginia’s most influential citizens. In 1819, at the age of only 29, Ruffner had organized the first Presbyterian denomination in the Kanawha Valley. Then, for nearly three decades, he had taught ancient languages at Washington College and served as the college’s president for 12 of those years.

December 13, 1861: Battle of Allegheny Mountain

Dec 13, 2018
The Battle of Allegheny Mountain was fought in Pocahontas County
Brian Powell / Wikipedia/Creative Commons

On December 13, 1861, the Battle of Allegheny Mountain was fought in Pocahontas County. Following the Battle of Greenbrier River at Camp Bartow on October 3, the Confederate army had withdrawn to winter quarters atop Allegheny Mountain. Union General Robert Milroy likely believed the Confederates were demoralized and launched an attack on the cold mountain summit. Milroy’s force of about 1,900 went up against the Confederate’s 1,200 troops.

December 11, 1905: Filmmaker Pare Lorentz Born

Dec 11, 2018
During World War II, Lorentz made hundreds of training films for pilots who were flying previously uncharted routes around the world.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / e-WV

Filmmaker “Pare” Lorentz was born in Clarksburg on December 11, 1905. After attending West Virginia Wesleyan College for a year, he transferred to West Virginia University, where he wrote stories for West Virginia Moonshine magazine. At the age of 20, he moved to New York City and began writing for some of the nation’s most popular magazines.

December 10, 1844: Clergyman William "Uncle" Dyke Garrett Born

Dec 10, 2018
 SharePrint Uncle Dyke Garrett
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online & Lillian Porter Smith

Clergyman William Dyke Garrett was born on December 10, 1844. Known affectionately as “Uncle Dyke,” Garrett was a legendary figure in Logan County history. At the beginning of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Confederate Logan Wildcats regiment. Being deaf in one ear, he wasn’t forced to fight. Instead, he was named chaplain of the unit.

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Grammy winning songwriter and producer Dan Wilson performs his rendition of "Someone Like You," live on Mountain Stage. Wilson co-wrote and produced the song with Adele, for her tremendously successful album 21.

December 3, 1787: James Rumsey Tests First Steamboat Near Shepherdstown

Dec 3, 2018
 Spectators gathered in Shepherdstown along the banks of the Potomac River to watch history being made.
E-WV

On December 3, 1787, spectators gathered in Shepherdstown along the banks of the Potomac River to watch history being made. Inventor James Rumsey stepped aboard a crudely built wooden boat and fired up a steam engine. The waters of the Potomac started churning up, and, suddenly, the boat headed upstream, leaving a stunned crowd in amazement.

November 3, 1828: Birthday of Surveyor-Geologist Jedediah Hotchkiss

Nov 3, 2018
Hotchkiss's mapmaking skills played a major role in “Stonewall” Jackson’s brilliant Shenandoah Valley Campaign.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Jedediah Hotchkiss, mapmaking, Stonewall Jackson, Civil War

Screenshot from the "Recovery Boys" trailer.
Elaine McMillion Sheldon / Netflix

West Virginia Public Broadcasting is partnering with Shepherd University next week to co-host a free screening of “Recovery Boys” – a feature documentary film directed by Academy Award nominated filmmaker Elaine McMillion Sheldon.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

First released by Bill Withers in 1974, "The Same Love That Made Me Laugh" has been covered by artists like Diana Ross, Al Jarreau and Joan Osborne. This week, it's our Song of the Week performed by Grammy-winning blues and soul man Robert Cray, who makes his sixth appearance on Mountain Stage on this week's encore broadcast.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

A throwback to classic southern soul music from a modern-day band, our Song of the Week comes from Alabama's St. Paul & the Broken Bones. Making their second appearance on Mountain Stage with songs from the highly acclaimed second full-length album "Sea of Noise," here's "Flow With It."

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

In the fall of 2017, Bruce Cockburn joined Neil Young in being inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. Our Song of the Week, "Lovers In a Dangerous Time," helps justify that distinction, and can be heard on this week's broadcast during Cockburn's sixth appearance on Mountain Stage with Larry Groce since 2004.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

Lovingly referred to as The First Family of the Banjo, partners in love, life and music Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn join us on the Mountain Stage for an extended set during this week's encore broadcast.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

Singing-dancing-acting duo Nancy And Beth (a.k.a actresses Megan Mullally and Stephanie Hunt) made their Mountain Stage debut in grand style with songs from their self-titled first release. While their set had plenty of good humor and levity, our Song of the Week is their moving performance of a soulful classic, "Waiting for My Child."

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

One of the best break-out Americana acts out of the Keystone State, Pennsylvania trio The Stray Birds return to the Mountain Stage with this radio-ready performance of their tune "Radio." Catch it on over 240+ NPR stations during this week's encore Mountain Stage broadcast.

Tim O'Brien
Josh Saul

No stranger to the Mountain Stage, acclaimed singer-songwriter and West Virginia native Tim O'Brien makes his returns to the program with a set of songs from the Mountain State, including this cover of Larry Groce's own "When the Mist Clears Away," which you can hear during this week's encore broadcast.

Judith Owen
Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

If Judith Owen had not gone off to become a powerhouse singer-songwriter, she could have easily become a full-time humorist with her sharp wit and self-deprecating charm.

For her fourth appearance on Mountain Stage, the Welsh chanteuse is joined by Portuguese percussionist Pedro Segundo and the legendary bassist Leland Sklar for a performance of "We Give In," which you can also hear during this week's broadcast.

Margo Price
Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

Country music's reigning honky-tonk queen, Margo Price, performs "Hurtin' (on the Bottle)" from this week's encore broadcast of Mountain Stage with Larry Groce. 

Pokey LaFarge
Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

"An aural anachronism of country, Western swing, ragtime, jazz, bluegrass and Americana [that] brings the nostalgia to Technicolor-life," critically-acclaimed Mid-Westerner Pokey LaFarge performs a rollicking "Hard Times Come and Go" during his fourth appearance on Mountain Stage with special guest host Todd Burge. 

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

On this week's encore Mountain Stage broadcast, critically-acclaimed "one-man orchestra of the imagination" Andrew Bird stops by with a set full of acoustic roots-pop (not to mention some A+ whistling).

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

On this week's encore broadcast of Mountain Stage, West Virginia super pickers Johnny Staats & Robert Shafer return with a new self-released record in tow titled Music from the Mountains, featuring this upbeat performance titled "El Cumbanchero." 

Amos Perrine / Mountain Stage

 

Piers Faccini is an English singer-songwriter with Anglo-Italian and Jewish roots who currently resides in Southern France. His music is just as storied as his past, blending folk, acoustic blues, and West African textures into his sound. For his Mountain Stage debut, he performs an even more colorful rendition of "Cloak of Blue" during this week's broadcast.

Sam Beam, Iron & Wine
Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

An ear for cinematic folk music, critically-acclaimed singer Iron & Wine performs "We Two are a Moon" during his Mountain Stage debut from the show's 33rd anniversary celebration.

Josh Saul / Mountain Stage

Once part of the Grammy-winning duo The Civil Wars, Southern folk musician John Paul White returns to the Mountain Stage to perform cuts from his new solo release Beulah, including the atmospheric lament "Once and Future Queen." 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia Public Broadcasting added a new reporter to its news team this week. Molly Born will be in Williamson, covering the southern West Virginia and Kentucky coalfields. Molly’s position is one of three in the region made possible through a partnership with the Charleston Gazette-Mail, the Lexington Herald-Leader and the GroundTruth Project’s Report for America initiative.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

Spellbinding folk with a captivating voice. It would only make sense for such a performance by Aoife O'Donovan to be titled "Magic Hour," one of the many songs we'll preview on this week's Mountain Stage broadcast.

Listen: River Whyless on Mountain Stage

Jan 4, 2018
Brian Blauser

Somewhere between experimental folk and traditional Appalachian you'll find Asheville-based band River Whyless, an up-and-coming indie act making their Mountain Stage debut on this week's broadcast (which includes this trip-loopy performance of "All Day All Night").

Brian Blauser

"You're fired up and you say you want it. No, don't ever lose your will to fight. Or wane when you think upon it. It's hard work, but it will be worth it."

Beckley.org

The governing board for West Virginia Public Broadcasting voted today to open a bureau in downtown Beckley and close its facility in Beaver.

The vote of the Educational Broadcasting Authority was unanimous.

Board members said they wanted WVPB to save money and increase its visibility by moving from the Raleigh Airport Industrial Park to downtown Beckley.

Closing the industrial park facility is estimated to save $100,000 a year, which will be re-invested in maintaining WVPB’s network of towers and delivery systems for its programs. No layoffs are planned.

US Senator Allen Taylor Caperton became the first ex-Confederate elected to the U.S. Senate and only former Confederate senator to serve in the U.S. Senate after the Civil War.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online

Allen Taylor Caperton was born on November 21, 1810, on his family’s estate in Monroe County. During the 1840s and 1850s, he served as a Whig in the Virginia House of Delegates and Senate. 

As the Civil War approached, Caperton was personally opposed to secession.  However, in April 1861, he served as a delegate to the Virginia secession convention and voted with the majority to join the Confederacy.

1970 Marshall University Football Team
Marshall University

On the night of November 14, 1970, a Southern Airways DC-9 approached a foggy and rainy Tri-State Airport in Wayne County. The airliner slammed into a hillside just short of the runway and burst into flames. All 75 passengers were killed.

On board were nearly the entire Marshall University football team along with the head coach, athletic director, and 36 other fans, coaches, announcers, and crew members. It is still the deadliest sports-related air disaster in U.S. history.

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