#WVFlood

Chuck Roberts / WVPB

Last year, we spoke with Keith Thompson and his mother Gerda right after the flood. Keith’s dad Edward passed away from complications of hypothermia after being in floodwaters for several hours. Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly went back to Rainelle to see how things have changed since the flood. She found that for Keith, the flood was just the beginning of his heartaches in the past year.

Chris Oxley/ WVPB

This week on Inside Appalachia, we are revisiting some of the people whose lives were changed forever after the flooding of 2016. This episode was part of a TV special called A Year of Recovery. We hear about the hurt of losing loved ones and how flood victims are coping after the disaster. We hear why when a community goes through devastation together, they can come out stronger.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Today marks one year since floods devastated many parts of West Virginia, killing 23 people and causing major damage to many communities, including homes, businesses and schools.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we'll hear about ways to deal with emotional stress associated with a traumatic event, like last the 2016 flooding in southern and central West Virginia. Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly speaks with Dr. Carol Smith, of Marshall University, about ways family and friends can help victims cope with disaster.

Also, The Allgheny Front's Reid Frazier takes a look at the effects of increased trucking from the fracking industry on small towns in northern West Virginia and southern Pennsylvania.

Chuck Frostick

There is more to recovery than physically rebuilding a house, or a building. Communities are also recovering mentally and emotionally. Dr. Carol Smith is a Professor of Counseling at Marshall University, says finding basic needs like food, clothing, and shelter is just the beginning.

Inside Appalachia co-producer and host Jessica Lilly sat down with Dr. Carol Smith to discuss the year of mental and emotional recovery that West Virginia faced since the flooding of June 2016. Parts of this interview are included in a special TV show, “Inside Appalachia: A Year of Recovery.” You can watch the show Tuesday night at 6:30 p.m. on WVPB or listen on radio.

Chuck Frostick

Inside Appalachia co-producer and host Jessica Lilly sat down with Major General James A. Hoyer of the WV National Guard to discuss the year of recovery that West Virginia faced since the flooding of June 2016. Parts of this interview are included in a special TV show, “Inside Appalachia: A Year of Recovery.” You can watch the show Tuesday night at 6:30 p.m. on WVPB or listen on radio.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from Major General James Hoyer about rebuilding efforts in parts of the state affected by last year's flooding. Inside Appalachia host Jessica also speaks with Hoyer about what the National Guard learned from the flood.

We also hear more about our Struggle to Stay series.

Perry Bennet / WV Legislative Photography

On this West Virginia Morning, lawmakers in Charleston have agreed on a budget deal and sent a bill to Gov. Jim Justice. Ashton Marra speaks with Jesse Wright about what is and isn't in the budget.

We also begin a series stories in recognition of the one-year anniversary of the devastating flooding that killed 23 people in West Virginia. Roxy Todd visited reverend and musician John Wyatt to see how Rainelle has been faring in the year since the flood.

WVPB

Friday June 23rd marks the one year anniversary of the 1,000 year floods, which left 23 dead in West Virginia and thousands of homes and businesses destroyed. West Virginia Public Broadcasting is spending the next few days hearing from some of the people who were affected by the flood, and hearing how residents are rebuilding their communities.

Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This week's Inside Appalachia is a special holiday edition.  We hear stories of Christmas past, present and hope for the future. We’ll check in with West Virginians still recovering from historic flooding that hit about 6 months ago, find out how to avoid gaining weight, hear a story about a welcomed Star of David on a Christmas tree, and more.

Donald Trump
Darron Cummings / Associated Press

What were the top stories in West Virginia from 2016? We searched our archives from the past year and compiled this list of the most popular stories.

Caroline and Bunny
Roxy Todd / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The USDA estimates that 6,000 West Virginia farmers suffered damage as a result of the flooding in late June. Farmers lost over $3 million worth of crops, livestock, and fencing. But more than the monetary cost- there’s also an emotional toll that’s affecting some of these farmers. One couple in Greenbrier County says they almost gave up after losing two dozen of their rabbits, and all of their vegetable crops, in the high water. 

Muddy cars sit in front a flooded-out home on Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Clendenin, in northern Kanawha County, W.Va.
Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has announced that it will provide additional rental assistance to victims of the June floods. 

FEMA said that victims who have already received rental assistance who have not already received a letter and a form in the mail will receive one soon. Households must return the completed form in addition to the following documents to apply for assistance: 

Glynis Board

This week on our Inside Appalachia podcast, we're revisiting some of the stories from our recent TV episode of Inside Appalachia. We hear stories of heroism and survival in towns like Richwood, Rainelle, and Clendenin. Residents and community leaders share their stories of loss and resilience.

Here's a link to the video:

Inside Appalachia: West Virginia’s 1,000 Year Flood

Jul 27, 2016

In this special television broadcast of Inside Appalachia with host Jessica Lilly, WVPB brings you the stories of heroism and survival in towns like Richwood, Rainelle, and Clendenin. Residents and community leaders share their stories of loss and resilience.

The National Weather Service called the June 2016 flooding in southern West Virginia an exceptional meteorological event, a vicious line-up of storms that came in simultaneously from multiple directions.

A month after the flood, businesses in the communities affected by the home are struggling. Some businesses in affected towns have reopened, but others say they are closing their doors for good.

W.Va. Flood Plan Gathering Dust on a Shelf

Jul 5, 2016
Downtown Richwood, WV, at dawn after hours of heavy rain flooded the little town.
Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Did you know West Virginia has a plan, more than a decade in the making, designed to save lives and prevent damage from floods?

And what if you found out this plan is mostly gathering dust on a shelf?

Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The two tents set up in a grocery store parking lot in Clendenin were overflowing with people waiting for tetanus vaccines Tuesday afternoon. A shipment of about 1,000 had been promised from out of state, but the FedEx truck holding them was held up in Memphis. Health Right, a free clinic based in Charleston, had about 50 to offer.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting will air the “Rebuild West Virginia” telethon to benefit flood recovery efforts on Friday 7 to 9 p.m. on WVPB’s main television channel. It will repeat from 9 to 11 p.m. on The West Virginia Channel.

NOAA

    

What role did climate change play in the 2016 West Virginia floods?

Climate scientists say they expect more intense rainstorms, like the one that dumped up to 10 inches on some West Virginia towns.

But Jessica Moore says not so fast. Moore is a senior geologist with the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey. She points to studies showing such extreme rainfall events were more common in our history that you may think. 

Listen to the full discussion on The Front Porch.

Sergeant First Class Casey Phalen / WV National Guard

The Federal Emergency Management Agency issued a press release announcing details on how survivors affected by West Virginia flooding can get assistance. Federal disaster assistance for individuals and families can include money for rental assistance, essential home repairs, personal property loss and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance.