Workforce Development

Minimum Wage Hike Would Have Major Effect in Ohio Valley

Jul 10, 2019
students and other supporters protest in 2015 on the University of Washington campus in Seattle, in support of raising the minimum wage for campus workers to $15 an hour.
AP file photo

A new report from the Congressional Budget Office shows increasing the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour would boost the wages of 17 million workers and lift about 1.3 million people out of poverty. But the CBO warns that could also result in more than one million lost jobs and could diminish overall income for others.

Josh Hernandez / Creative Commons

Japanese truck maker Hino Motors Manufacturing is set to open its new West Virginia assembly plant this summer.

Hino Motors has scheduled an Aug. 21 grand opening for the facility in Mineral Wells. The company is moving about 20 miles to a larger location at a former retail distribution center.

Automation For The People? Ohio Valley At High Risk For Job Losses

Mar 14, 2019
Amazon employs 2,500 people at its Jeffersonville, IN, facility.
J. Tyler Franklin / Ohio Valley ReSource

Amazon employee Andre Woodson made his way among yellow bins traveling through a vast warehouse filled with boxes and envelopes to be packed, sorted and shipped. In Amazon-speak, this is a “fulfillment center.”

“Our Jeffersonville, Indiana, fulfillment center is about 1.2 million square feet, which is equivalent to about 28 football fields,” Woodson explained.

It’s Friday, which means we're joined by veteran statehouse reporters to discuss the latest action from the West Virginia Legislature. Host Suzanne Higgins is joined by Jake Zuckerman and Ryan Quinn of the Charleston Gazette-Mail and Brad McElhinny of WV MetroNews.

Senate Education Chair Patricia Rucker, R-Jefferson. Jan. 15, 2019.
Will Price / WV Legislative Photography

Senators in the Senate Education Committee Tuesday unanimously approved Senate Bill 1 -- “Increasing access to career education and workforce training.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a bill we followed closely during the 2018 legislative session could resurface in the 2019 session – legislation that would offer tuition assistance to in-state students attending a community and technical college. It was often referred to as the free community and technical college bill, and it would’ve provided the “last dollar in” after all other forms of financial aid had been exhausted.

Jessica Leake / Blue Ridge Community and Technical College

West Virginia Public Broadcasting held a community outreach event Tuesday night at Blue Ridge Community and Technical College in Martinsburg to discuss the future of jobs in the Eastern Panhandle.

One of West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s organizational goals is to help facilitate an ongoing statewide conversation about job opportunities in West Virginia – what jobs are out there and what are the barriers to getting them?

Join West Virginia Public Broadcasting and Blue Ridge Community and Technical College in Martinsburg as we co-host a FREE panel discussion with regional experts exploring the future of job opportunities in the Eastern Panhandle – and how to get there.

Max Pixel

Officials say West Virginia has a new, tuition-free coding school.

The Herald-Dispatch reports Huntington Mayor Steve Williams was among officials who announced the launch of NewForce on Thursday at Mountwest Community and Technical College. Potential students do not need experience in coding, software development or math.

Hundreds of Jefferson County residents and locals from nearby counties rallied outside the Jefferson County Community Center on Saturday Aug. 25, 2018 to protest the Rockwool company.
Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The European-based insulation manufacturing company Rockwool held a handful of community open houses last week at the Jefferson County Community Center. The aim was to better-connect with residents, many of whom don’t want the company to locate in the Eastern Panhandle. Rockwool’s final open house drew a crowd of hundreds who rallied outside to protest the plant.

Samantha Richards (right), Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer for Patient Care Services, Berkeley and Jefferson Medical Centers speaking with a nurse at Berkeley Medical Center in Martinsburg.
John Hale / West Virginia Public Broadcasting


In his State of the State Address, Governor Jim Justice made clear his intention to make West Virginia’s community and technical colleges free for in-state students. A bill to accomplish that was introduced shortly after this year’s state Legislative session began.

 

The main goal of the bill is to cultivate a strong workforce in West Virginia by making education at community and technical colleges more accessible. West Virginia Public Broadcasting took a closer look at CTCs and their focus on workforce training.

Perry Bennett / Legislative Photography

Gov. Justice’s second State of the State made full use of several props, two whiteboards and his entire girls’ basketball team.

Justice also laid out what he thought was really important in his speech. Here are two themes I heard: finally turning the corner on the opioid epidemic, and helping young people find technical and vocational careers.

Unemployed Seek New Job Opportunities

Nov 23, 2015
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, we’ll meet two African American women who did something unique for their generation.  They went to college.  One of them, who is now 93 years old, became a teacher and one of her students went on to earn a Ph.D.  The story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Governor Tomblin Holds Workforce Development Summit

May 5, 2015

Governor Tomblin says anyone who wants to work can get a job.  Today, he noted the efforts of his workforce development council to make all West Virginians career ready.  

    Close to 60 percent of all the new jobs in West Virginia will require at least a two year college degree through the year 2018.  So the governor convened the first ever Governor's Workforce Summit at BridgeValley Community and Technical College in South Charleston to address it.  The governor said he took a little known seven member committee overseeing workforce needs in the state, to a bigger and more powerful council that includes higher education and community college chancellors, the superintendent of schools, the secretaries overseeing the Division of Rehabilitation and Commerce as well as the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Resources.  Tomblin says DHHR workers could counsel welfare recipients about becoming employed.

The governor suggested that DHHR counselors can suggest to their clients that there is a better life for them and their children if they got a job.  He noted that there is no longer the danger of losing medical insurance which kept many single mothers from becoming employed.
    The governor said all of these agencies are on the council so each is not working in a separate silo, but sharing information and resources.