West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Lawmakers will begin their work at the statehouse today as they gavel in for the first of the 60-day legislative session.

That work  will be followed by Gov. Jim Justice’s first State of the State Address tonight where he’ll present legislators—and the public—with his legislative agenda and his plan to balance the 2018 budget. Statehouse reporter Ashton Marra discusses what to expect during the session and the governor's address.

Nairouz Katrib
courtesy of Liu Yang

On this West Virginia Morning, Nairouz Katrib is a Syrian immigrant. She moved to West Virginia 8 years ago to study at West Virginia State University.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Patricia Harman is the author of the bestselling novel The Midwife of Hope River

A midwife herself, she was featured in an April 2016 episode of Inside Appalachia focused on the tradition of home birth in the region.

Harman's latest book – The Runaway Midwife – hits bookstore shelves Monday. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a report on the energy policy positions of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump and Liz McCormick profiles the two major candidates for state treasurer.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Pepperoni rolls have been called the unofficial food of West Virginia. Legend has it they were originally made for coal miners to take underground in their dinner buckets- because the cured pepperoni didn’t spoil. 

A new book ABOUT Pepperoni Rolls is set to be published next year. On this week's episode of Inside Appalachia Roxy Todd talks with the writer of this new book to learn more.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A look back at how West Virginia turned politically from blue to red. Anne Li took a deeper look at what happened leading up to the flip back in 2014 and whether voters’ feelings then will impact this year’s state legislative races.

Also, Allegheny Front reporter Reid Frazier looks at why some worry Shell's new ethane cracker in Beaver County will bring pollution back to Pittsburgh. The planned facility will use ethane from the region's natural gas to produce 1.6 million tons of plastic a year.  

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, hear highlights from last night's second and final gubernatorial debate between billionaire Jim Justice and  state Senate President Bill Cole.

And as much of the state deals with the problem of overdoses, the West Virginia State Board of Education doesn’t want to stand by till it happens at a public school. Clark Davis reports on how some schools in the state are taking extra steps to prepare for worst-case scenarios.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Two years in, the challenges and benefits of expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Kara Lofton reports that while the program has been overwhelmingly beneficial, coming up with funds for it is still a challenge. 

With the opioid crisis driving up overdose rates across the Ohio Valley, a once-obscure medication is becoming a household feature. Naloxone can reverse an overdose and, with training, can be administered by just about anyone. Aaron Payne reports that the drug is saving lives, but is no silver bullet for the region’s addiction problems.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, an NPR Investigation in 2014 found Justice was one of many coal mine owners across the country who had ignored millions of dollars in safety fines, putting miners at risk. At the time, Justice promised to pay all of his fines.

He didn't. In fact, NPR has found he is now the nation’s top delinquent mine owner, owing more money than he did two years ago and NPR's Howard Berkes reports his debts extend far beyond his coal mines.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Pennsylvania's natural gas is a hot commodity in energy hungry markets throughout the Northeast. But there's some concern that the radioactivity common in the state's shale deposits could be making its way into the gas--and into people's homes as radon. The Allegheny Front's Julie Grant has more.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Dr. Robert Rupp weighs in on the importance and power of political debates both nationally, and here in West Virginia. He’s a member of the State Election Commission and a professor of political science at West Virginia Wesleyan College. Rupp spoke with Ashton Marra about the first presidential debate and what West Virginia’s candidates for governor can take away from it before they hit the air waves tonight. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

First: In the 12 refugee resettlement areas in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia, evacuees are thriving. Forty Syrian refugees are expected this month in Bowling Green, Kentucky, where more than 10,000 asylum seekers from around the world have settled over the past 35 years, creating new homes and new businesses.

Then: the current President of the Kentucky Coal Association is leaving the energy industry, for a job back in his hometown of Huntington, West Virginia. Hear his thoughts on how business can spur healthier communities.

...on this West Virginia Morning.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This West Virginia Morning, the special meaning behind apple pie with the state's folklorist, Emily Hilliard.

Learn more about the RECLAIM Act with reporter Benny Becker who spoke with two lobbying participants about their hopes that the bill will open new opportunities for coalfield economies.

And: Jam grass heroes Leftover Salmon return to Mountain Stage this week, with a song that contemplates West Virginia History: "Blair Mountain." Listen to Leftover Salmon with this Mountain Stage song of the week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Chemical Safety Board approved recommendations last night that were the result of an investigation into a 2014 Charleston chemical leak. 

The leak spurred a tap water ban for more than 300,000 West Virginians. Before the vote, the board heard directly from members of the public who were affected by the leak. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia's foster care system is dealing with the fallout of the drug epidemic. We hear from one family who intimately understands the challenges that the state faces on this West Virginia Morning.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

President Obama’s signature environmental effort to reduce carbon emissions from power plants is back in a courtroom today. More than two dozen state attorneys general are challenging the federal government’s proposed regulations. Leading the fight is West Virginia’s Patrick Morrisey.

Tropical Fruit Called a Pawpaw Grows in Appalachia

Sep 26, 2016
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

There's a tropical fruit in season right now, and it grows right here in Appalachia. It's called a pawpaw, and it resembles and tastes like a mango. 

Last week, at least 8,000 visitors from around the world flocked to Athens, Ohio, to celebrate the fruit at the Pawpaw festival. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Twenty American veterans turn to suicide every day according to a new report from the Veteran’s Administration. Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author Eric Newhouse spoke with Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly to give some understanding about the struggle this group of veterans face when they return from war.  

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It’s been about 15 years since the opioid epidemic first hit Appalachia, and now, there’s a whole generation of teenagers in West Virginia and Kentucky who have grown up with drug addiction strongly affecting their friends and families. 

Carrie Mullens is a novelist from Eastern Kentucky who returned from college to find that her community had been devastated by the drug epidemic. Mullens spoke with Roxy Todd about her coming-of-age novel based on the frightening realities facing many young Appalachians.   

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin has signed a bill to provide $85 million in state funding to help pay for continued flood clean-up and recovery costs. 

The $85 million accounts for 25 percent of the nearly $340 million in total damage caused by the June 23, 2016, flood that killed 23 people. The federal government will pay the rest of the cost.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission says too many college students in West Virginia are dropping out.  The agency says students are becoming discouraged when they go to college and are placed in remedial courses to strengthen their basic math and English skills because those classes don’t count for college credit, but students still have to pay for them.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, earlier this year in McDowell County, the Walmart superstore—the county’s only chain grocery store-- closed, making it tougher for residents to access food. Even before the Walmart shut its doors, much of McDowell County was already considered a food desert- an area where a large number of people don't have a large grocery store in their town.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, officials from the Appalachian Regional Commission and the United States Economic Development Administration visited Huntington this week to announce millions of dollars in funding for Appalachian communities struggling with the effects of coal’s decline. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Managing Editor of the magazine West Virginia Living Zack Harold discussing his latest article, "High Hopes for a New Cash Crop," focused on the state's budding hemp industry.  The article appears in the latest edition of Morgantown Magazine and he joined Ashton Marra to discuss it reporting. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In the first part of 2015, the percentage of uninsured Americans dropped almost 12 percent due to the Affordable Care Act, but even though more Americans are insured than ever before, deductibles – the amount of money you have to pay before insurance kicks in – have skyrocketed, going up by almost 70 percent since 2010. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In Clay County, the process of recovery after June 23 and 24 flooding is just beginning as volunteer firefighters, the American Red Cross and the National Guard continue to pass out food and water and remove potentially hazardous debris from the county.

Philanthropy West Virginia, a three person non-profit based in Morgantown, shifts its focus from its normal work to aiding in flood relief efforts, directing donations to the hardest hit areas.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we look at where we are now – one week since historic flooding devastated parts of West Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear the latest on the flood relief efforts in the southern and central regions of the state.

We also hear from Jessica Moore, senior geologist with the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, about how the devastating floods last week may not be connected to climate change.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra brings us a flood recovery update after Governor Earl Ray Tomblin visited two of the hardest hit communities – Rainelle and Clendenin.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from survivors of the flooding that devastated southeastern West Virginia.

While the Federal Emergency Management Agency is providing aid, Kara Lofton reports most of the rescues, cleanup, and support so far has been provided by the local communities.

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