West Virginia Morning

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll learn about the name of the town of Odd, West Virginia in Raleigh County. Also, in this show, we hear a conversation with a professor in Appalachia who works to lift the voices of LGBTQ authors in rural spaces, and we hear this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week brought to us by the John Pizzarelli Trio.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from a pediatrician who weighs in on whether children should return to public school in the fall. Also, in this show, we hear an excerpt from the latest episode of Us & Them about the challenges of receiving mental health care during the coronavirus pandemic.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from Dr. Cathy Slemp, who was recently ousted from her position as the state’s top public health official. Also, in this show, we hear a report from Marshall University as the school voted to remove the name of a Confederate soldier from a campus building; we hear about a settlement paid to a Black woman from Charleston who was forcefully arrested last year, and we hear from author Jordan Farmer on his new book Poison Flood.

On this West Virginia Morning, Gov. Jim Justice has ordered the wearing of face masks inside public buildings in West Virginia. Also, in this show, a middle school on Charleston’s west side will change its name after the Kanawha County Board of Education voted unanimously to remove an association with Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, and we hear a story about modern dance from our Appalachia Folkways Project.

On this West Virginia Morning, Dave Mistich speaks with Report for America fellow Chris Jones about his recent story looking at and defining two movements: Antifa and Boogaloo Boys. Also, in this show, we remember Vietnam veteran Dave Evans who touched the lives of not just West Virginians, but many people around the world. Evans spent his life after the military helping those ravaged by war. We also hear an interview with a man who worked to tackle challenges faced by Charleston, West Virginia’s Black community during a time when some say urban renewal forced many Black residents in the city to leave their neighborhood.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an update from Gov. Jim Justice who is warning of mandating face masks in public. Also, in this show, we hear how colleges and universities in the state are reacting to financial challenges brought on by COVID-19; we hear the latest on the unprecedented numbers of unemployment claims in the region; we hear about a federal spending bill that may help improve infrastructure in coal-reliant communities, and we hear this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

On this West Virginia Morning, we learn about a family-owned Black newspaper in Virginia that just celebrated its 80th anniversary. The publisher, Claudia Whitworth, is rejecting the idea that people only want to hear negative stories. Also, in this show, we hear an excerpt from the latest episode of Us & Them exploring whether the topic of abortion has become too heavily divided to discuss differences civilly.

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear from a veteran reporter who covers the environment about the struggling system that makes sure that mining sites are cleaned up. Also, in this show, we hear about a resolution passed Tuesday in Shepherdstown calling on Gov. Jim Justice to require face masks across the state, and we hear how COVID-19 has affected worship for Muslims.

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear a conversation about the coronavirus, antibodies and what medical researchers are trying to learn about immunity as it relates to the ongoing pandemic. Also, in this show, we hear about a resolution passed in Shepherdstown that “strongly encourages” businesses there to require customers to wear face masks.

On this West Virginia Morning, a group of residents in Letcher County, Kentucky confront a judge over a Facebook post in which he downplayed racism and accused protesters of heightening tensions. Also, in this show, we hear how religious leaders in West Virginia are responding to the coronavirus pandemic at their places of worship. We also visit some towns in the state to hear how the pandemic’s economic impact is affecting local tourism.

On this West Virginia Morning, while some statues of confederate generals have been toppled or ordered down in some cities and towns, the debate carries on in other places. We hear about one man’s mission to bring down a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee in Murray, Kentucky. Also, we hear about Appalachia’s connection to Wales through music, and we listen to this week’s Mountain Stage song of the week.

On this West Virginia Morning, health officials in the state are concerned that people are becoming too relaxed about the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, making outbreaks more likely. Also, one of the state’s top health officials has resigned. And if the state were to tighten restrictions, what might that mean for our friends in recovery from substance abuse?

On this West Virginia Morning, we have stories about an award-winning fiddler, a special kind of fungi housed at West Virginia University, and we hear from a Kentucky voter who previously had her voting rights taken away due to a felony charge.

On this West Virginia Morning, in the only state born of the American Civil War, we explore the discussion of whether to remove statues that celebrate confederate civil war heroes. Also, an update on where pipelines and hiking trails intersect.

On this West Virginia Morning, we’re still celebrating Father’s Day. We hear from some new dads who became fathers during the coronavirus pandemic. Also, we meet Tina Russell, the first Black woman in West Virginia’s history to win a democratic primary in Mercer County.

On this West Virginia Morning, we conclude our week of youth-themed coverage with a father who shares the memory of meeting his daughter just after she was born. Also, we hear another winning student writer – this time from kindergarten. We also have a discussion on how the coronavirus pandemic has disproportionately affected black Americans, and we bring you this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

On this West Virginia Morning, we continue hearing from and about kids. In this show, we highlight the conversation black families have with their teenagers about the police, and we share a special note from a mom to her kids about injustice and oppression. Also, we hear from a career school graduate in Fayette County who explores the reputation of career and trade schools as higher education institutions.  

On this West Virginia Morning, we continue to hear from and about the youth in our region. In this show, we hear the perspective of a young farmer, and we also hear from one of our first place winners in this year’s West Virginia Public Broadcasting Writers Contest.

On this West Virginia Morning, we share a youth report on an athlete’s perseverance. We also hear about what high schools in West Virginia are doing about graduation ceremonies, and we check in with communities cleaning up after flooding this weekend.

On this West Virginia Morning, all this week we’ll be hearing from and about some of West Virginia’s younger residents. We hear a youth essay from Charleston where one young black West Virginian shares his vision for the future, and we also hear from young people in the Ohio Valley region.

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear about a long-lost piece of music written half a century ago by Phillip Glass. We also hear an excerpt from the latest episode of Us & Them about how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting the country’s food supply.

On this West Virginia Morning, we bring you the latest on West Virginia’s primary election. We also hear a report on protests against racism and police brutality in the Ohio Valley region, and we look at an investigation into a public water utility that serves Fayette County.

On this West Virginia Morning, it’s primary election day in West Virginia. The election was postponed due to the coronavirus. In this show, we answer questions you may have if you’re heading out to the polls. Also, we speak with author Amy Jo Burns about her new novel “Shiners.”

On this West Virginia Morning, protests against police brutality and racism continue across West Virginia; we bring you reports from Charleston and Bluefield this weekend. We also bring you a report about an online action group called Black Birder’s Week, and we hear from black faith leaders from across West Virginia who attended a virtual listening session with U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin.

On this West Virginia Morning, it's election season, and in West Virginia that used to mean everyone and their dead brother was casting a vote. Have times changed? We talk with a historian about voter fraud. Also, we hear a report on high numbers of cases of COVID-19 in the Eastern Panhandle, and we bring you this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

On this West Virginia Morning, we have a conversation with coronavirus czar Dr. Clay Marsh. Also, we speak with Kentucky attorney and author Cassie Chambers about her memoir “Hill Women.”

On this West Virginia Morning, we conclude a three-part series of stories on candidates vying for seats on the West Virginia’s Supreme Court of Appeals. We also bring you reports from protests in West Virginia against police brutality and racism, and we speak with historian Stan Bumgardner who shares an essay on Appalachia.

On this West Virginia Morning, we meet the Division 2 candidates running for the West Virginia Supreme Court. Plus, we answer some of your voting questions, and we bring you a report on reopening concerns in the Ohio Valley.

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore the traditional craft of basketmaking. We also meet the Division 1 candidates running for seats on the West Virginia Supreme Court.

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore the unique connection between Wales and Appalachia. We also bring you a report on food insecurity in the Ohio Valley, and we listen to this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

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