West Virginia Legislature

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Clark Davis looks at the Rock Creek Development Park one of former Governor Earl Ray Tomblin’s pet projects and Liz McCormick reports on legislation to manage the state’s fleet of government vehicles.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

At The Legislature Today, although the budget has been the top priority for lawmakers this session, it’s implications trickle down into all areas of state government, including education.

Del. Paul Espinosa and Sen. Kenny Mann, chairs of the House and Senate Education Committees, say even though there may be less money for schools, they are working through bills to give counties more flexibility in how they spend that funding.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The Senate has approved a bill that changes the eligibility requirements for unemployment benefits for striking workers. 

The chamber approved Senate Bill 222, 22 to 11, with one Senator absent on Wednesday.

Moody's Downgrades W.Va. Bond Rating

Feb 22, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, cancer mortality rates are higher in rural Appalachia than in other parts of the country.  Appalachia Health News reporter Kara Lofton looks into that and deputies in Monongalia County are using body cameras for the first time.  Anne Li will have the details.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Lawmakers are 14 days into this legislative session and so far, not a single bill dealing with broadband expansion has been introduced. The issue received attention early last session, but lawmakers say they’re still working on a plan to reach both unserved and underserved areas of West Virginia.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The third bond rating agency in a year announced Tuesday it would be downgrading West Virginia's rating, from AA1 to AA2. 

West Virginia’s Revenue Secretary Dave Hardy announced the decision during a press conference at the Capitol with Gov. Jim Justice.

“This just makes me sick," Justice said after the announcement. "I mean, that’s just all there is to it."

Senator Explains Bill to Eliminate W. Va. Income Tax

Feb 21, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, statehouse reporter Ashton Marra talks with Senator Robert Karnes about his bill to eliminate the personal income tax and The Allegheny Front’s Julie Grant reports on the Waters of the U.S. rule which President Trump has vowed to repeal.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Over the past several years, West Virginia voters have decided on a county-by-county basis whether to allow hunting on Sundays, and many counties have approved the measure.

A bill now being considered in the state Senate would make those provisions uniform across counties.

TRIP Report: W.Va. Roads in Bad Shape

Feb 17, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a new national report says the state’s bad roads are costing drivers a lot of money and Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly talks with a Wyoming County family about the quality of their water. 

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Is Justice Tax Plan DOA in the Legislature?

Feb 16, 2017
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

"In a rhetorical flourish almost certainly unlike any in the history of West Virginia gubernatorial oratory, Jim Justice spread his arms wide and moaned in an impression of Frankenstein’s monster."

That's how WV Metronews reporter Brad McElhinny described the end of Gov. Jim Justice's State of the State address. Justice was making a point about the state budget mess, a deficit of almost $500 million.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A national research group says the deficiencies, congestion, and lack of safety features on West Virginia’s roadways are costing drivers in the state more than a billion dollars every year.

Gov. Jim Justice plans to drastically change that by increasing the funding to the state’s road system, but members of the Senate have mixed feelings about whether that plan can succeed.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, the latest news from the West Virginia Legislature and Appalachian Health News reporter Kara Lofton talks with president of Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield about a change in their hospital policies.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

On The Legislature Today, the Chairs of the House and Senate Finance Committees are digging deep into state agencies to find efficiencies or cuts that could potentially save the state money. 

Del. Eric Nelson and Sen. Mike Hall discuss the state's $497 million budget gap for the 2018 Fiscal Year and how they intend to fix it. 

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Senators are considering a bill that would change the eligibility for unemployment benefits for workers on strike. It’s a measure the bill’s lead sponsor says other states have adopted, but West Virginia union leaders already oppose.

Senate Bill 222 would make workers who have temporarily lost their jobs due to a strike ineligible for unemployment benefits from the state. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, statehouse reporter Ashton Marra talks with Senate President Mitch Carmichael about his goal to eliminate the state’s income tax and Beth Vorhees talks with Dr. William White who now leads of state’s office of Minority Affairs.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, the House of Delegates is considering a bill that would strengthen the penalties for violating whistleblower protections and access to abortion is being restricted in West Virginia and surrounding states.

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Leaders in West Virginia’s House of Delegates say they plan to strengthen a number of ethics laws in West Virginia this legislative session. The first piece of legislation making its way through that chamber this year is House Bill 2006, increasing penalties for violating the state’s Whistle-Blower Law.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The Senate Select Committee on Tax Reform is charged with finding a way to shift the state’s reliance on personal income tax revenue to dollars raised through increased consumption taxes. That’s according to Senate President Mitch Carmichael, who created the committee in January.

At their first meeting Friday, Carmichael told members he believes that West Virginia’s economic growth is hindered by its reliance on income taxes. 

Legislators Hear Budget Details

Feb 10, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, House and Senate reporters Liz McCormick and Ashton Marra report from the finance committees where the Governor’s tax proposals were discussed and Wilco is along with our Mountain Stage song of the week.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Gov. Justice Outlines Budget Plans

Feb 9, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, reports from the State Capital about Governor Justice’s first State of the State address last night and reaction to it.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Perry Bennet / West Virginia Legislative Photography

In his first State of the State address Wednesday evening, Gov. Jim Justice presented lawmakers with a plan to close a $497 million budget gap in the 2018 fiscal year. That’s the latest estimate from the Governor’s Office about just how big that hole will be.

Justice’s proposal is largely based on increasing taxes, something he said on the campaign trail he wouldn’t do.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Lawmakers will begin their work at the statehouse today as they gavel in for the first of the 60-day legislative session.

That work  will be followed by Gov. Jim Justice’s first State of the State Address tonight where he’ll present legislators—and the public—with his legislative agenda and his plan to balance the 2018 budget. Statehouse reporter Ashton Marra discusses what to expect during the session and the governor's address.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice waves to the crowd as he delivers his inauguration speech, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, in Charleston, W.Va.
Walter Scriptunas II / AP Photo

West Virginia’s 36th Governor Jim Justice will give his first State of the State Address to a joint meeting of the state Legislature Wednesday evening. West Virginia Public Broadcasting will carry the speech live on radio, television and online beginning at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

State Budget Will Dominate Legislative Session

Feb 3, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, there’s a big hole in the state budget and House Speaker Tim Armstead has some ideas about how to fill it and Larry Groce performs our Mountain Stage song of the week.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a ten percent tax credit helps restore historic structures in the state, but a group says that’s not enough and they are lobbying to increase it and our collaborative series with StoryCorps continues with a conversation about faith between an elderly man and his pastor.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, statehouse reporter Ashton Marra reports on Governor Tomblin’s farewell address delivered yesterday at the State Capitol. 

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

. One of the most significant established ‘‘Mother’s Pensions.’’
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / WV Humanities Council

Anna Johnson Gates died on January 12, 1939, just before her 50th birthday. In the 1910s, the East Bank native fought for women’s suffrage.

After women were granted the vote nationally in 1920, she served as the associate chair of Kanawha County’s Democratic Executive Committee.

Then, in 1922, she was elected to the West Virginia Legislature, becoming the first woman ever to serve in that body.

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin during his farewell address Wednesday in the House of Delegates chamber.
Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For the past six years each January, Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin has returned to the chamber where he began his political career to address members of the Legislature, Board of Public Works, Justices of the Supreme Court and citizens of the state of West Virginia.

Martin Valent/Perry Bennet / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Optimism. That’s the key to moving the state of West Virginia forward, according the newly elected Senate President and House Speaker.

The 83rd Legislature gaveled in for the first time Wednesday to elect chamber leaders and take their oaths of office, hearing for the first time as a body from the men who will lead them through the upcoming Legislative session.

Officials Defend Regional Education Service Agencies

Jan 10, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, some lawmakers are not convinced that the state’s eight Regional Education Service Agencies are needed and Appalachia Health News reporter Kara Lofton has a look at what will happen to health care if Congress repeals the Affordable Care Act without a backup plan.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

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