U.S. Senate

June 18, 1937: John D. Rockefeller IV Born in New York City

Jun 18, 2019
Office of Jay Rockefeller

John D. Rockefeller IV was born in New York City on June 18, 1937, just weeks after the death of his great-grandfather, business tycoon John D. Rockefeller. Jay—as the wealthy Rockefeller heir was known—first came to West Virginia as a poverty volunteer in the 1960s. He soon attracted national attention by switching his party affiliation from Republican to Democrat. He was elected to the West Virginia House of Delegates in 1966 and as secretary of state two years later.

On May 13, 1941, Fairmont State College President Joseph Rosier was seated in the U.S. Senate, ending one of the state’s most bizarre political tussles. He was succeeding Democratic powerbroker Matthew Neely, who’d stepped down as senator to become West Virginia’s 21st governor.

In this April 9, 2019 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is capitalizing on a fellow Republican's attack by selling "Cocaine Mitch" shirts on his campaign's website.

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

 State founder Peter G. Van Winkle died in Parkersburg on April 15, 1872, at age 63. The native of New York City had moved to Parkersburg in 1835 to practice law. Through his wife’s family, he became a key player in the region’s oil industry. He also helped organize and serve as president of the Northwestern Virginia Railroad.

November 21, 1810: US Senator Allen Taylor Caperton Born

Nov 21, 2018
US Senator Allen Taylor Caperton became the first ex-Confederate elected to the U.S. Senate and only former Confederate senator to serve in the U.S. Senate after the Civil War.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online

Allen Taylor Caperton was born on November 21, 1810, on his family’s estate in Monroe County. During the 1840s and 1850s, he served as a Whig in the Virginia House of Delegates and Senate. 

As the Civil War approached, Caperton was personally opposed to secession.  However, in April 1861, he served as a delegate to the Virginia secession convention and voted with the majority to join the Confederacy.

Left Photo: Alex Brandon, Right Photo: Jesse Wright / Photo Illustration by West Virginia Public Broadcasting


Midterm elections have historically served as a referendum of those in power. With Republicans controlling the White House and both chambers of Congress, that could be the case this November, especially in one of West Virginia’s biggest races -- the race for U.S. Senate.

There are a slew of issues at play, but much of the race has been about how much, or when, the candidates have attempted to align themselves with President Donald Trump.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

Inside the Senate chamber Friday, lawmakers gathered to consider Brett Kavanaugh's controversial nomination to Supreme Court. There, the federal judge earned just enough support to advance to a final vote on his confirmation.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Senate campaign of Republican Patrick Morrisey says he has accepted an invitation to debate incumbent Democrat Joe Manchin on Nov. 1.

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, speaks during a town hall to kick off his campaign in Logan, W.Va., Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

Democrats make up the bulk of signatures so far on a petition to let ex-coal executive Don Blankenship run in West Virginia's U.S. Senate race as the Constitution Party's nominee, preliminary data shows.

Molly Born / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at 5:05 p.m.

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship has again filed paperwork with the West Virginia Secretary of State’s Office to run for U.S. Senate -- this time on a third-party’s ticket. His new bid for office -- filed Tuesday, July 24, with the Secretary of State’s office -- is a challenge to the state’s so-called “sore loser” law.

Candidates in the race from the two major parties expressed differing views on Blankenship’s potential challenge to the state’s election laws.

Tyler Evert / AP Photo

A former coal executive who spent a year in prison is set to challenge West Virginia’s “sore loser” election law by running for U.S. Senate as a member of the Constitution Party following a failed bid for the Republican Party nomination.

In a statement issued Monday, Don Blankenship’s campaign representatives already said they do not expect the filing to be certified and will challenge the anticipated denial.

Supporters talk with former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, center, prior to a town hall to kick off his campaign in Logan, W.Va., Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018.
Steve Helber / Associated Press file photo

Despite losing the Republican primary in a distant third-place, convicted ex-coal baron Don Blankenship announced Monday that he will continue his bid for U.S. Senate as a third-party candidate, though it's unclear if the move violates West Virginia's "sore loser" law.

Steve Helber / AP File Photo

Updated: Monday, May 7, 2018 at 9:42 a.m.

Just a day before West Virginia's primary election, President Donald Trump has weighed in on the GOP Primary. With Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship gaining widespread attention in the lead-up to Tuesday, Trump tweeted early Monday morning -- urging West Virginians to vote against the coal baron. Monday marks the first occasion the president has publicly spoken for or against any candidate in the race.

Courtesy Patrick Morrisey for U.S. Senate

 

Updated: May 6, 2018 at 8:20 p.m.

One GOP candidate for U.S. Senate in West Virginia says one of his opponents should be ineligible for Tuesday’s primary.

With former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship seeming to gain momentum as Election Day nears, state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey held a news conference Sunday to announce that he’s informing the former coal baron’s probation officer about illegal activity -- in April the Charleston Gazette-Mail reported Blankenship failed to file a financial disclosure with the Senate.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Rep. Evan Jenkins' dream of a U.S. Senate seat has opened a door for other ambitious West Virginia politicians, prompting a rush of contenders for his congressional seat and giving Democrats their best chance for a pickup in the Mountain State.

Eleven candidates are on the ballot in Tuesday's primaries for the 3rd Congressional District seat Jenkins is vacating, including six current or former state legislators.

Manchin Photo: Jesse Wright / Swearengin Photo: Courtesty of the campaign

Updated: Friday, May 4, 2018 at 12:00 p.m.

President Donald Trump won West Virginia by 42 percentage points in 2016. He’s holding on to high approval ratings in the state and conservatives paint Democrat incumbent U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin as vulnerable. Long known as a moderate Democrat, Manchin has been in West Virginia politics for three decades. With the seat up for grabs this year, the national spotlight has been on the GOP primary -- in which hopefuls are trying to align themselves with Trump.

Scott McCloskey / The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register

Just days before West Virginia’s primary, the race for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate has become increasingly aggressive and bold with attacks between candidates. Fueled by the national spotlight, a recent string of debates and high-dollar out-of-state spending, GOP Senate hopefuls have focused their bids on aligning themselves with President Donald Trump -- who maintains a strong approval rating in the state at 61 points, according to March polling from Morning Consult.  

Ex-Con Candidate Compounding GOP Woes in West Virginia

May 1, 2018
Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, speaks during a town hall to kick off his campaign in Logan, W.Va., Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

Republican Don Blankenship doesn't care if his party and his president don't think he can beat Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin this fall.

This former coal mining executive, an ex-convict released from prison less than a year ago, is willing to risk his personal fortune and the GOP's golden opportunity in West Virginia for the chance to prove them all wrong.

Scott McCloskey / The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register

All six Republican candidates for U.S. Senate squared off Monday night in Wheeling during an hour and a half long debate as they aim for a seat in the U.S. Senate. The candidates made mention of their affinity for President Donald Trump while heavily criticizing Democrat incumbent Joe Manchin.

Trump
Still from White House video

“Why don’t you just fire the guy?”

The question came in a press availability with President Trump soon after he learned that federal agents, acting on information from Special Counsel Robert Mueller, had raided the offices of his personal lawyer, Robert Cohen.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

There's a new fact-checking operation in West Virginia, and it buries one fact — that it's run by U.S. Senate candidate Don Blankenship's campaign.

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, speaks during a town hall to kick off his campaign in Logan, W.Va., Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

A report says the former coal executive convicted of violating federal mine safety standards has failed to turn in a required financial disclosure for his U.S. Senate race.

Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

A former coal company CEO who served a one-year prison term on charges related to the deadliest U.S. mine disaster in four decades is kicking off his U.S. Senate campaign with a town hall meeting for voters.

Ex-Massey Energy boss Don Blankenship is scheduled to attend the meeting Thursday night at the Chief Logan Lodge, Hotel and Conference Center in Logan. Blankenship has said he wants to tell voters why he's the best candidate. A news conference is planned afterward.

Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is hosting a town hall meeting for voters next week as he revs up his candidacy for the U.S. Senate.

Walter Scriptunas II / AP Photo

Editor's Note: This is a developing story. Please be sure to revisit this post for the latest. This post was last updated Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at 7:22 p.m.

 

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is running for U.S. Senate as a Republican. Blankenship served one year in federal prison for conspiring to violate federal mine safety standards in the wake of an explosion that killed 29 miners in April 2010.

West Virginia Attorney General's Office

West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey is stepping down as chairman of the national organization of Republican attorneys general.

C-SPAN 2

U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin, running for re-election next year, says his campaign raised more than $1.4 million in the most recent quarter and has nearly $3.5 million on hand.

The Democrat, seeking a second, full six-year term, says Thursday that the total includes $250,000 in contributions from West Virginians in June.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, most of the state’s trees are harvested by small-scale logging operations, like the one owned by Scotty Cook in Elkins.  

Producer Jean Snedegar joins Cook on his latest job in a remote area of southern Randolph County.  

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

With 15 months to go until Election Day, yet another candidate has added his name to the list of those vying for Democrat Joe Manchin's seat in the U.S. Senate.

John Raby / AP Photo

West Virginia's Republican Attorney General Patrick Morrisey has scheduled a political event Monday where he's expected to announce his candidacy for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Democrat Joe Manchin.

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