U.S. Attorney Mike Stuart

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice gives a speech during a Department of Tourism conference Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, at the Morgantown Event Center.
Jesse Wright / WVPB

U.S. federal prosecutors on Tuesday said they will seek a court ruling to hold West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice and his son, Jay Justice, personally accountable for a $1.23 million civil fine imposed on one of the family’s coal businesses, Justice Energy Company, Inc.

 

Don Ryan / AP Photo

An invitation only Wednesday event in Charleston was billed as a symposium on marijuana, but skewed towards opposition of the drug’s legalization for medical and recreational purposes.  The event, titled The Colorado Experiment: A Look Back and What You Need to Know, touched on ecological, medical, public safety and law enforcement positions related to marijuana -- with all of the speakers standing in opposition to reforms that would provide wider access to the drug.

Ted S. Warrem / AP Photo

A federal prosecutor will hold a symposium on marijuana Wednesday in Charleston. The invitation-only event will feature law enforcement officials and researchers opposed to marijuana legalization.

Mike Stuart, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia, is hosting the event alongside a regional task force aimed at curbing drug trafficking. 

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A grand jury in West Virginia’s southern district has indicted state Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry on 22 counts. The charges include fraud, witness tampering and making false statements.

U.S. Attorney Mike Stuart says FBI agents arrested Loughry Wednesday morning and brought him to the Robert C. Byrd federal courthouse in Charleston for processing.

Mike Stuart
U.S. Attorney's Office

U.S. Attorney Mike Stuart has been recused from representing the federal government in a case involving former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship's criminal mine safety conviction.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo


Gov. Jim Justice called legislators back into session this week to fix laws passed during the regular legislative session. But addressing flaws in the state’s medical cannabis program wasn’t on the special session call. Democrats are working outside the regular lawmaking process to fix banking issues within the cannabis industry, but the viewpoint of a federal prosecutor seems to be having some influence on the progress.