sustainability

One person's weeds are another one's lunch. Your own yard may have a bounty of wild plants that are both edible and tasty. Learn how to make a yard salad with Barbara Volk!

Pokeweed has been eaten in Appalachia for generations. Many West Virginians have fond memories of their grandmother heaping piles on their plate of this delicious cooked green, which is often compared to asparagus in taste.

 

But it's poisonous and deadly when eaten raw. Learn the safe way to collect and prepare pokeweed shoots from naturalist Bill Beaty.

 

Native Appalachian plants are a largely untapped and understudied natural resource. The mayapple is a prime example. Wild-crafted for generations, studies now reveal the plant has life-saving properties.

Dr. Eric Burkhart, a field botany expert, explains the uses of mayapple, and how it could be a special crop that offers economic befits throughout the Appalachian region.

Sassafras root makes an excellent tea. Learn the right way to do it from naturalist Bill Beatty!

Edible Mountain is a bite-sized, digital series from WVPB that showcases some of Appalachia’s overlooked and underappreciated products of the forest, while highlighting their mostly forgotten uses.

Concord University's Marsh Hall Bell Tower.
Christopher Ziemnowicz / CZmarlin / wikimedia Commons

A report looking at higher education in West Virginia has recommended merging the governing boards of Bluefield State College, Concord University, Glenville State College and West Virginia State University.

The report labels those four schools "medium risk to high risk" in sustainability. It says the four are "sustainable in the short-term, but their futures are uncertain." The report recommended the move, in the short term, for Bluefield and Concord, and in the long term for Glenville and WVSU.

chickens, Hopecrest, Hopecrest chickens, grapes, Tracey Lea Frisch
Anne Li / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Tracey Lea Frisch loves her pet chickens, which she keeps in her yard on the side of her house in the Hopecrest neighborhood in Morgantown. 

 

“This is Pudding and Vanilla and Mr. Looster and Lucky and Star and Moonlight and that’s Roadrunner, and that’s Fluffy - the big one,” she said as she fed them grapes. “I have one broody; she’s pretending to have chicks. It’s not going to happen.” 

 

Ben Adducchio / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It's dark. It's damp. It's your basement, or crawl space. And for some people in Clarksburg, it's a labor of love to go down there and find ways to improve energy efficiency.

Basement Systems of West Virginia does work to improve the energy efficiency of homes by encapsulating crawl spaces. That means they take materials, similar to pool liner, and other things to create what they call “clean spaces.”

It’s their hope to improve conditioning and energy efficiency in these dim, dark places.