Social Media

Teachers John and Kerry Guerini of Fayetteville, West Virginia, hold signs at a rally at the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va., Monday, Feb. 26, 2018.
John Raby / Associated Press

The public education uprisings that began in West Virginia and spread to Arizona, Oklahoma and Kentucky share similar origin stories.

Teachers, long tired of low wages and a dearth of state funding, begin talking to each other online.

Their Facebook groups draw tens of thousands of members. They share stories of their frustrations and then they demand change.

Kanawha County Schools

The local branches of the American Civil Liberties Union and the American Federation of Teachers are opposing the Kanawha County school board's proposed social media policy over its rules on monitoring communications.

Ethics Commission
ethics.wv.gov

A recent advisory opinion by the West Virginia Ethics Commission gives public officials guidance on the use of social media such as Twitter and Facebook.

The opinion says public officials can't use public resources to manage or post on their personal or campaign social media. Photographs taken by the public agency or for the agency's use also can't be used.

Bigbot / wikimedia commons

Kanawha County Commission President Kent Carper is asking state ethics officials whether county officials can publicly recognize business owners and post photos on social networking sites like Facebook.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports the state Ethics Commission issued an advisory opinion saying public officials should post photographs of themselves only on the home page of governmental websites or on biographical pages.

WV State Troopers, WV State Police
Suzanne Higgins / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Law enforcement officials say the public shouldn't use social media to request immediate help.

West Virginia State Police spokesman Lt. Michael Baylous tells The Charleston Gazette that the agency doesn't have the manpower or resources to monitor its Facebook page around the clock.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting

If you’ve been paying attention to our news output here at West Virginia Public Broadcasting as of late, you’ve probably noticed an increased focus on data and digital journalism. Sure, we tell stories on the radio, but emerging technology and innovations have inspired us to present our stories in a new and interesting way.

As part of The Needle and the Damage Done, we wanted to allow our audience to get a better understanding of West Virginia’s heroin problem.

  Seemingly everyone in West Virginia has been affected by the heroin epidemic in the state. There are addicts themselves, family members struggling to find them help, the doctors, nurses and paramedics on the front lines trying to save lives and lawmakers and law enforcement officials trying to put a stop to it all--no one seems to be spared.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

If you’ve been watching West Virginia politics play out on social media this election season, you’ve probably noticed some pretty vitriolic rhetoric. Some of it comes from the usual suspects--like candidates and their parties. But, some of it--it’s not clear where it’s coming from. Not surprisingly, there are those who contribute to the state’s political discourse through the veil of anonymity.

Byrd's Finger: A Contractor for the Republican Party

When it comes to politics on Twitter, one of the most active accounts in West Virginia is Byrd’s Finger. It’s an obvious reference to the late Democratic senator Robert C. Byrd. But, there’s no question it’s coming from a Republican point of view.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Who knew a doodle of the state could inspire a social media campaign? Especially one that not only shows potential but has proven successful in just a short amount of time.

That's been the case with Draw West Virginia.

Kristi George / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Everyone here at West Virginia Public Broadcasting is excited for Saturday's Antiques Roadshow taping at the Charleston Civic Center. We wanted to share a bit of the behind the scenes action as it happens right here.

Whether you were lucky enough to get a ticket (be sure to share your experience using #wvantiques!) or following along at home or on the go, have a look at all of the interesting antiques and quirky heirlooms from our various social media feeds:

The Law Works - Social Media & Employment

Oct 11, 2013

Are you active on Facebook, on Twitter, Pinterest, or other forms of social media? They can be fun. They can keep you in touch. They can be dangerous.  Attorney C. David Morrison joins host Dan Ringer to talk about Social Media and Employment on this episode of The Law Works.

This episode premiers October 17, 2013 at 8:30pm on WV PBS.

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