Rural

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear a two-part story from Report for America corps member Emily Allen. The small southern West Virginia town of Kermit has had more than its fair share of national headlines, especially when it comes to the town’s struggle with the opioid crisis. 

But few stories focus on the people themselves. Emily visited Kermit earlier this summer to hear from several residents, and what they think the town needs to emerge from that struggle.

A handful of health science students from across West Virginia are receiving help to pay for their final year in graduate education.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear about how summer food providers are trying to overcome the challenge of feeding West Virginia kids during the summer months, and we’ll hear the latest on possible impeachment proceedings from the statehouse. These stories coming up on West Virginia Morning.

Samantha Richards (right), Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer for Patient Care Services, Berkeley and Jefferson Medical Centers speaking with a nurse at Berkeley Medical Center in Martinsburg.
John Hale / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Seventeen health science graduate students from across West Virginia are getting money to help pay for their education.

Why? Because the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission has awarded some health sciences grad students a chunk of cash to help pay for their college education – so long as they commit to practicing medicine in a rural or underserved community in West Virginia following graduation.

Texting, texts
Pexels

 


High school seniors in West Virginia who sign-up to receive text message reminders for college preparedness are doing better in their first-year of college, according to a recent study. And findings show this prep tactic is even more effective in rural areas. West Virginia Public Broadcasting explored why and brings you this report.

Photo Courtesy of Mountain Comprehensive Care

Certain areas of West Virginia may soon see an increase in behavioral health providers.

Over $850,000 has been awarded to Marshall University to help boost the number of behavioral health providers in underserved and rural areas of the state.

 The House of Delegates is reviewing legislation that would require Internet providers to offer download speeds of at least 10 megabits per second to promote their broadband service as "high speed," according to the Charleston Gazette-Mail. 

Many rural West Virginians don't have Internet speeds anywhere near that. Customers with slow service can't use TV- and movie-streaming services.