Report For America

Zac Northup / Standwatch Academy

Earlier this year, eight girls from Lincoln County High School went on an adventure out West. The trip was made possible by a nonprofit called Standwatch Academy, a group that teaches rural high school kids about entrepreneurship. 

Emily Allen / West Virginia Public Broadcasting


When the Grant County 911 center received a call about a house fire on Martin Road in late May, director Peggy Bobo Alt said it was already too late. 

Doris Fields, also known as Lady D, West Virginia's First Lady of Soul, lead the Friday night vigil in song with 'We Shall Overcome' by Pete Seeger.
Emily Allen / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

As Ryan Brown stood outside the West Virginia Capitol Buidling on a breezy Friday evening, her husband Ali was in Guinea, the neighboring country to Sierra Leone where Ali’s originally from. 

 

F. BRIAN FERGUSON / CHARLESTON GAZETTE-MAIL

For many families in parts of eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, the absence of clean, reliable drinking water is part of daily life.

Blaine Taylor, a 17-year-old resident of Martin County, Kentucky, struggles to manage basic hygiene when his water comes out with sediment in it.

“I had to use a case of water last night just to get enough water in my bathtub just to get myself cleaned up for today at school,” he said. “It’s rough.”


Daniel Walker / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Public Broadcasting will be part of the 2019 Report for America initiative that will allow WVPB to add a full-time multimedia reporter to its news staff, starting in June.

The position will be based in Charleston, covering southern West Virginia, with a focus on public affairs and state government.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia Public Broadcasting reporter Molly Born and Charleston Gazette-Mail reporter Caity Coyne have been working on a series of stories about water infrastructure issues in the southern coalfields. They’re both fellows with Report for America, an initiative that aims to strengthen local journalism.

Jason Walker, one of the Cedar Creek residents who have accused Dynamic Energy of contamining their water, poses near a creek from which he draws water to flush his toliets.
Molly Born / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In May 2016, a jury found that a coal company owned by then-candidate for governor, Jim Justice, wasn’t responsible for contaminating the water wells of several Wyoming County residents. Still, an order requiring the firm to provide temporary fresh water stayed in place, and the water kept coming -- until recently, when it abruptly stopped. 

Reporter Mahlia Posey reports near the Viking Wash Plant in Justiceville, Kentucky as part of The GroundTruth Project's "Crossing the Divide" reporting project.
Ben Brody / GroundTruth

Three prominent, regional news organizations have come together today to launch a project that will provide deeper news coverage for local communities in the coal fields of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky.