Red State Blue State

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, something unusual happened last month: Congress passed an opioid law -- and did it with overwhelming bipartisan support … in both chambers. It was a broad, $8 billion bill that expands access to health services and recovery centers. So it looks like addressing the opioid epidemic is one thing Democrats and Republicans can agree on. And that’s the topic of this week’s Red State, Blue State -- our weekly chat between Cherry Glazer of KCRW in California and West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Trey Kay.

Make Apple Butter, Not War

Nov 21, 2018
Making apple butter
WVPB

Election season’s over, but we sure haven’t put politics behind us. Not with the holidays approaching.

Some families avoid talking politics over the turkey, but other family gatherings descend into political fights.

Trey Kay takes us on a visit to a family with deep political divisions — but they also have a trick for keeping it friendly. It turns out some jars of preserves can help preserve the piece.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, it’s time to gather round the table with family, eat turkey, and talk. America’s political divisions seem to amplify during the holidays, as families across the country gather and either talk politics politely -- or avoid it altogether. In today’s episode of West Virginia Morning, we bring you another installment of “Red State Blue State.”

The Enemy of the People

Nov 16, 2018

Political debate in this country has become anything but civil. Who's to blame?

Nearly a third of Americans surveyed by NPR said: “the media.”

Can the news media win back trust?

In this episode, Red State host Trey Kay goes to a Trump rally to see how reporters are treated, and Blue State host Chery Glaser talks with a West Coast journalist about how journalists should respond.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, here are two messages you can read from the midterm elections: candidates in California were rewarded for opposing President Trump -- critics like California’s new Gov. Gavin Newsom won big. But in a red state like West Virginia, Sen. Joe Manchin was returned to office for, some say, embracing the president and siding with him on key issues. So how did we get here?

Cherry Glazer of KCRW in California speaks with West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Trey Kay in the latest episode of “Red State Blue State”, our weekly chat between Trump Country and the Blue Bubble.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a new poll of West Virginia high school seniors shows that young people may not be as tied to party politics as you might think. The poll was conducted by Inspire West Virginia -- a nonpartisan organization that encourages high school students to be civically engaged -- and 100 Days in Appalachia, a media partner of West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Glynis Board recently sat down with Ashton Marra to discuss the results. Formerly a member of our team, Ashton is now the digital managing editor of 100 Days in Appalachia.

The migrant caravan moving through Mexico is nowhere near the U.S. border, yet it's smack dab in the middle of the nation’s politics.

But immigration pushes different political buttons in West Virginia and California.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the midterm elections are just around the corner. Republicans from Texas to Appalachia are campaigning on a common theme this week: closing the border, building the wall and stopping that migrant caravan from Honduras. Fear of illegal immigration is a key message. And it’s the topic for this installment of Red State Blue State, our weekly chat between Trump Country and the Blue Bubble of southern California.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, in the past, President Trump has written off science and called climate change a “total and expensive hoax.” This week, Trump said in an interview with 60 Minutes that the climate is changing, but it’s not “man-made”, it might reverse itself, and it’s not worth losing millions of jobs over. After all, Trump has promised to jumpstart the struggling coal industry. 

Climate change and energy jobs are hot issues, but they spark very different reactions from folks in different parts of the country. Those reactions are the heart of this installment of “Red State, Blue State," our weekly chat between Trump Country and the Blue Bubble.

Sen. Joe Manchin
Simon Edelman, U.S. Energy Department

West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s pick for the U.S. Supreme Court. Manchin was the only Democrat in the Senate to cross party lines, and he did it in a very public way. Manchin’s vote didn’t surprise many Mountain State voters, but it left a lot of people in other states asking, “Why is he even a Democrat?”

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear about the growing culture around Appalachian food, and we’ll explore the latest happenings in politics with another installment of “Red State Blue State.”

With all turmoil surrounding Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination, red and blue state voters are taking the long view. This is the second episode of "Red State Blue State,"  WVPB's collaboration with KCRW in California.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear perspectives about increasingly politicized Supreme Court nominations from a red state and a blue state.

From coast to coast, it’s all eyes on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination. “Red State, Blue State” is a weekly chat between Trump Country and the Blue Bubble, brought to you by KCRW and West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

If you really listen, we sound like two different countries: Red America and Blue America. Then again, most of us are not listening. Heading into the midterms KCRW and WVPB are teaming up to try to change that.