Racism

On this West Virginia Morning, a group of residents in Letcher County, Kentucky confront a judge over a Facebook post in which he downplayed racism and accused protesters of heightening tensions. Also, in this show, we hear how religious leaders in West Virginia are responding to the coronavirus pandemic at their places of worship. We also visit some towns in the state to hear how the pandemic’s economic impact is affecting local tourism.

On this West Virginia Morning, while some statues of confederate generals have been toppled or ordered down in some cities and towns, the debate carries on in other places. We hear about one man’s mission to bring down a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee in Murray, Kentucky. Also, we hear about Appalachia’s connection to Wales through music, and we listen to this week’s Mountain Stage song of the week.

On this West Virginia Morning, we conclude our week of youth-themed coverage with a father who shares the memory of meeting his daughter just after she was born. Also, we hear another winning student writer – this time from kindergarten. We also have a discussion on how the coronavirus pandemic has disproportionately affected black Americans, and we bring you this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

On this West Virginia Morning, we continue hearing from and about kids. In this show, we highlight the conversation black families have with their teenagers about the police, and we share a special note from a mom to her kids about injustice and oppression. Also, we hear from a career school graduate in Fayette County who explores the reputation of career and trade schools as higher education institutions.  

On this West Virginia Morning, protests against police brutality and racism continue across West Virginia; we bring you reports from Charleston and Bluefield this weekend. We also bring you a report about an online action group called Black Birder’s Week, and we hear from black faith leaders from across West Virginia who attended a virtual listening session with U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin.

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin hosted a virtual listening session Friday evening with Reverend Ronald English and other black faith leaders from across West Virginia. It was the first of a planned series of discussions called From Hurt to Healing.


On this West Virginia Morning, we conclude a three-part series of stories on candidates vying for seats on the West Virginia’s Supreme Court of Appeals. We also bring you reports from protests in West Virginia against police brutality and racism, and we speak with historian Stan Bumgardner who shares an essay on Appalachia.

Corey Knollinger / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Gov. Jim Justice is urging West Virginians to remain peaceful and nonviolent as protests against racism and police brutality continue around the country. 

Across the United States, thousands of Americans are protesting the death of George Floyd, a black man who died last week while a Minneappolis police officer held him down with a knee on Floyd’s neck. Some protests have reportedly led to destruction of property, and police in some cities have responded by using force against protesters and journalists.

Eric Douglas / WVPB

W.I. “Bill” Hairston is a professional storyteller. He spins tales about a number of different topics  —  some made up and some real. 

During a recent talk at the West Virginia State University Economic Development Center on Charleston’s West Side he devoted his entire presentation to the topic “Growing Up Black in Appalachia.”

Hairston was originally born in Phenix City, Alabama in 1949. He describes the area of the town where he lived as being predominantly black. 

W.Va. Delegate Charged In Doorkeeper Incident

Sep 10, 2019
Mike Caputo
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A West Virginia lawmaker has been charged for kicking a door into a statehouse staffer and elbowing a delegate because he was mad about racist signs at the Capitol, authorities said.

The fallout continues from an anti-Muslim poster and materials displayed Friday during West Virginia’s GOP Day at the Capitol. Host Suzanne Higgins speaks with leaders of three religions – Islam, Judaism, and Christianity – who all say the issues of racism and discrimination go far deeper than Friday's events.

Southern Foodways Alliance/ Gravy

Being a farmer isn’t easy. One woman in Georgia found that getting assistance as a black farmer can be especially tough.

Shirley Sherrod said she found discrimination in the federal government’s farm assistance programs, and she and other farmers fought back in the biggest class action lawsuit in U.S. history. Listen to the episode to hear the results of the lawsuit, and what it meant for farmers across the country.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear about a growing educational trend to get young students outside more often; how an elementary school in the Eastern Panhandle aims to provide more opportunities to its students with an outdoor classroom. Also, we hear a panel discussion from Wheeling on race and living as a minority in the historically white state of West Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an excerpt from our latest Us & Them podcast episode called, “The Black Talk.”

Do you remember the first time you learned that police may think of you as a threat? If you’ve never been given the talk on how to conduct yourself when stopped by the police, chances are you’re not African-American.

How old were you when you first learned that police may think of you as a threat?

You’ve never been told that?

Wikimedia Commons/ Snoopywv

High-profile confrontations between African-Americans and police officers have fueled racial tensions across the country. How do we in Appalachia talk about how these issues affect us here in the mountains?

Shepherd University

Author Wiley Cash is the 2017 Appalachian Heritage Writer-in-Residence at Shepherd University. His newest novel The Last Ballad will be released October 3. Cash sat down with reporter Liz McCormick to discuss his latest work, which centers on union leader and balladeer Ella May Wiggins, who died during the Loray Mill Strike in Gastonia, North Carolina in 1929.

Trump Perry, Trump Perry Sign
Twitter

A West Virginia school superintendent has issued an apology after some said they were offended by a banner at a football game that read "Trump Perry."

A Republican U.S. senator from one of Donald Trump's most popular states says the president's comments about the violent white supremacist rally in Virginia has created a firestorm and that he should unite the country against racism.

Michelle Obama
Molly Riley / AP

West Virginia officials are investigating finances at a nonprofit group whose director came under fire after making a racist comment about first lady Michelle Obama on Facebook.

News outlets report state Bureau of Senior Services and Appalachian Area Agency on Aging officials visited the Clay County Development Corporation Wednesday to meet employees.

West Virginia University

This article has been updated to clarify the desription of Breitbart News Network.   

West Virginia University President E. Gordon Gee released a statement today that defended his decision to allow Milo Yiannopoulos to speak on campus while also condemning Yiannopoulos' attack on a faculty member. 

Lauren Stonestreet, of Elle Effect Photography

This week on Inside Appalachia, we’re talking about food and some of the food we southern Appalachians are  famous for.

We’ll travel to explore stories and the roots of some southern food, visit a historic salt mine in West Virginia that’s being revived and we’ll head over to a fried chicken festival in Virginia.

Teams Assess How to Combat Racism in W. Va.

Nov 5, 2015
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a report from Martinsburg where Governor Tomblin held a summit about substance abuse.  And from Wheeling, Glynis Board reports on an organization that is working to help women achieve economic self-sufficiency. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

This week, Inside Appalachia is hearing from people across the region, sharing their views about the Confederate Battle Flag.

Zion Episcopal Church

Civil Rights activist Ruby Sales is coming to Charles Town Saturday to speak to the community and open up a dialogue on racism and injustice.