Parkersburg

Eldora Nuzum
E-WV / West Virginia Humanities Council

On August 8, 1974, the Elkins Inter-Mountain published its daily newspaper, but it was far from business as usual. The August 8 issue had to be printed in Parkersburg because the newspaper’s building in Elkins had been destroyed by fire the day before.

July 2, 1829: Potter and Businessman A.P. Donaghho Born

Jul 2, 2019
A.P.Donnaghho pottery
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

Potter and businessman A. P. Donaghho was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, on July 2, 1829. After learning the pottery trade in his native state, he moved to Parkersburg in 1870 and opened a pottery operation there in 1874.

Donaghho made pottery by hand, “throwing” it on a potter’s wheel just as it’d been done for hundreds of years. It was salt-glazed, meaning that damp salt reacted in the hot kiln to produce a sodium aluminum silicate glaze. When thoroughly dry, the ware was placed in a bottle kiln to be fired.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The leader of West Virginia’s Republican party is applauding a state senator’s call for intolerance against members of the LGBTQ community.

Republican state Sen. Mike Azinger wrote an opinion article Sunday titled “The Shame of LGBTQ Pride” in The Parkersburg News and Sentinel after the paper covered a gay pride picnic. State GOP chairwoman Melody Potter then wrote on Facebook that Azinger’s article was “right on.”

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

 State founder Peter G. Van Winkle died in Parkersburg on April 15, 1872, at age 63. The native of New York City had moved to Parkersburg in 1835 to practice law. Through his wife’s family, he became a key player in the region’s oil industry. He also helped organize and serve as president of the Northwestern Virginia Railroad.

March 6, 1820: Great Seal Designer Joseph H. Diss Debar Born in France

Mar 6, 2019
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / Design by Joseph H. Diss Debar

  Joseph H. Diss Debar was born in France on March 6, 1820. He immigrated to the United States at age 22. On his voyage across the Atlantic, he happened to meet and become friends with author Charles Dickens.

Diss Debar eventually wound up in Parkersburg as a land agent. For 29 years, he lived in either Parkersburg or the Doddridge County community of St. Clara, which he founded for German-Swiss immigrants. During this time, he sketched numerous people and scenes, providing some of our best images of life on the western Virginia frontier.

January 28, 1937: Worst Recorded Flooding Occurs Along the Ohio River

Jan 28, 2019
Nobody living between Huntington and Parkersburg had ever seen anything like the 1937 flood, which was brought on by melting snow and 19 straight days of rain.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online.

On January 28, 1937, the Ohio River crested in Huntington nearly 20 feet above flood stage. Days earlier, it’d crested at the same level in Parkersburg and 10 feet above flood stage in Wheeling.

January 16, 1892: Activist Robert Simmons Dies

Jan 16, 2019
 Sumner was the first school for African American children in present-day West Virginia and south of the Mason-Dixon Line.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / WV Humanities Council

Robert Simmons died at his Parkersburg home on January 16, 1892. A free black man during the days of slavery, he moved to Parkersburg in 1841 and earned a living as a barber. He and his wife Sarah worried that their nine children wouldn’t receive a proper education.

So, in 1862, he and other free black men established Sumner School in Parkersburg. Sumner was the first school for African American children in present-day West Virginia and south of the Mason-Dixon Line.

December 24, 1852: B&O Railroad Completed Near Moundsville

Dec 24, 2018
When West Virginia statehood leaders carved out the new state’s borders, the eastern panhandle counties were included primarily to keep the B&O in West Virginia and outside of Confederate Virginia.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / e-WV

On Christmas Eve 1852, the last spike was driven on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad between Baltimore and the Ohio River. The event occurred at Rosbys Rock near Moundsville.

Photo courtesy of Wood County 911

A federal judge has dismissed part of a lawsuit in connection with an industrial fire in West Virginia.

July 24, 1823: West Virginia Governor Arthur Boreman Born in Pennsylvania

Jul 24, 2018
Arthur Boreman
E-WV

West Virginia Governor Arthur Boreman was born in Pennsylvania on July 24, 1823. When he was young, his family moved to Tyler County. And then, in 1845, Boreman relocated to Parkersburg, which would be his hometown for the rest of his life.

February 12, 1901: Congressman Jacob Blair Dies at 79

Feb 12, 2018
Jacob Beeson Blair
e-WV Encyclopedia

Congressman Jacob Blair died in Utah, on February 12, 1901, at age 79. He was born in Parkersburg in 1821 and orphaned at a young age. He studied law under his uncle John Jay Jackson Sr., was admitted to the bar, and then elected prosecuting attorney of Ritchie County.

Dave Mistich

What do you do when a panhandler hits you up for some money? Whatever your answer is, what experiences or facts inform your policy for giving or not giving? People have strong opinions on this. With this episode we try to separate the facts, suppositions and ideology.

In later years, he was involved in an automobile dealership and a real estate addition in the Spring Hill section of South Charleston
e-WV / WV Humanities Council

Labor lawyer Harold Houston died in Florida on January 17, 1947, at age 74. When he was young, his parents moved from Ohio to Jackson County and then to Charleston.

In 1901, after getting a law degree from West Virginia University, Houston opened a legal practice in Parkersburg.

December 11, 1893: Governor Jacob Jackson Dies in Parkersburg

Dec 11, 2017
Governor Jacob Beeson Jackson (1829-93)
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / WV State Archives (WVSA)

West Virginia’s sixth governor, Jacob Jackson, died in Parkersburg on December 11, 1893, at age 64. The son and grandson of congressmen, Jackson came from one of the region’s most distinguished families. His father was also one of West Virginia’s founders.

Jackson first worked as a teacher and then opened a legal practice in St. Marys. He served as the Pleasants County prosecuting attorney before and during the Civil War. His work took him occasionally to Wheeling, where he was once arrested for making pro-Confederate remarks.

Photo courtesy of Wood County 911

West Virginia environmental authorities have approved cleanup plans by the owners of the industrial warehouse that burned for a week in Parkersburg.

Photo courtesy of Wood County 911

Three lawsuits seeking damages following the industrial warehouse fire that burned for a week in Parkersburg have been moved from state to federal court.

Courtesy of Wood County 911

West Virginia emergency officials say federal guidance following the warehouse fire that smoldered for more than a week in South Parkersburg shows spikes in the soot initially detected in the air.

Wood County 911

Multiple warehouse facilities belonging to a group of companies that owned the West Virginia warehouse that burned for more than a week have been inspected.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, across the country, the tense relationship between African-American communities and police officers has become a focus throughout social and news media spheres.

On the latest episode from West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Us and Them podcast, host Trey Kay reports on an effort to resolve the tension between police and a black community in Charleston, by bringing that tension out into the open.

Wood County 911

Ten days since an industrial fire began in Parkersburg, public officials have yet to be provided an accurate inventory of what was on the property when the fire began. The fire at an old Ames plant -- now a recycled plastics warehouse owned by Intercontinental Export Import, Inc. -- was declared extinguished around noon Sunday.

Wood County 911

An industrial fire that burned for more than eight days in Parkersburg has been extinguished, but questions remain as state officials investigate the incident.

Wood County 911

Officials in Parkersburg say a fire at a warehouse storing recycled plastics has been extinguished after burning for eight-and-a-half days. 

The exact contents of the warehouse have yet to be released. Officials say materials data that was initially handed over by the property owner is outdated and other documentation was destroyed in the fire. 

Wood County 911

West Virginia emergency officials say a warehouse fire that began last week is nearly out.

Lubeck Fire Chief Mark Stewart estimates that the fire in South Parkersburg is "90 percent" extinguished from ongoing efforts by firefighters.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For the latest on the fire in Wood County, see here.

West Virginia regulators on Thursday ordered the Maryland company that owns a South Parkersburg warehouse that burned for days to disclose what materials were consumed by the flames and to spell out plans for disposing of the debris properly.

Photo courtesy of Wood County 911

For the latest on the fire in Wood County, see here.

Wood County is under a state of emergency as an industrial fire continues to burn at a warehouse just outside Parkersburg city limits. Gov. Jim Justice joined state and county officials to discuss ongoing efforts to put the fire out and to address residents’ health concerns.

Still, a lot of questions remain about the incident and how it might affect residents of the surrounding area. Here’s what we know (and what we don’t know):

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For the latest on the fire in Wood County, see here.

 

Updated: October 24, 2017 at 12:38 a.m.

 

Governor Jim Justice declared a state of emergency in Wood County on Monday afternoon, following an industrial fire that has burned at the former Ames tool plant since early Saturday morning.

Courtesy of Wood County 911

For the latest on the fire in Wood County, see here.

 

Updated: Oct. 23, 2017, at 5 p.m.

 

Gov. Jim Justice declared a state of emergency in Wood County Monday afternoon in response to an industrial fire in Parkersburg that has burned since early Saturday morning.

 

The fire was reported at about 1 a.m. Saturday at the old Ames tool plant, just outside Parkersburg city limits.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, with resources and funding in question, officials in Wood County are still trying to determine how to deal with a large industrial fire just outside of the city limits of Parkersburg.

Wood County 911

For the latest on the fire in Wood County, see here.

 

Updated: October 22, 2017 at 10:36 p.m.

 

With resources and funding in question, officials in Wood County are still trying to determine how to deal with a large industrial fire just outside of the city limits of Parkersburg. The fire, which started about 1 a.m. Saturday and destroyed a warehouse facility, is expected to burn for days as local officials still have no timeline as to when the fire will be out.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Before a September 12th Parkersburg City Council meeting, LGBTQ rights advocates held a rally to let members of the council know that, despite the failure of a non discrimination ordinance, they’ll continue to fight for equal rights in their hometown.

In early August, the Parkersburg City Council shot down an ordinance that would have protected residents from employment and housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

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