Outdoors

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we have a few stories about how best to cope with anxiety – both for kids, and adults. We also bring you this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll talk to an author and playwright who has thought a lot about how growing up in our region shapes what we become. We’ll also bring you the latest headlines on coronavirus in West Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we'll hear a harrowing snake story. We’ll also bring you the latest update on the state response to the coronavirus.

BARB SARGENT / COURTESY WV DNR

There is a lot happening in the world that is stressful. But the risk of the coronavirus doesn’t necessarily have to mean you have to barricade yourself indoors. Diseases spread in close quarters, so some researchers advise that you should get outside and exercise with your friends if you can. Go on a walk. You can still avoid sneezing into each other's faces and make sure you wash your hands, but your immune system loves to be outside.


Jesse Wright/WVPB

Increasingly, teachers are finding that spending time in nature with their students is essential to learning. In this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll hear from educators who are knocking down classroom walls so that kids can get some fresh air and exercise, and improve test scores in the process.


Daniel Walker/ WVPB

This week on Inside Appalachia, we’re going on a road trip to meet people who are working in Appalachia to preserve American culture and traditions.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Moring, we reported earlier this year on an economic development project to grow lavender on former strip mines in West Virginia. After the story aired, we heard from a number of students involved in the program, saying they were disappointed and felt misled by the outcomes of the project, called Green Mining. Roxy Todd revisits the story to find out what happened, and if the project is still going as expected.

Adobe Stock

A little over a decade ago, a psychologist named Richard Louv coined the term “Nature Deficit Disorder,” meaning that human beings, especially children, are spending less time outdoors, to the detriment of their mental and physical health. It’s not an officially recognized medical disorder. But health professionals from various fields are embracing the idea that America’s shift toward sedentary, indoor lifestyles is harming our health.  

 

 

Purple Orchid
Claire Hemme / West Virgina Public Broadcasting

If you live in West Virginia, chances are, you’ve driven past a cluster of wild pink or white orchids just off the side of a curvy road. Some of the best opportunities in the country to find them are located along our rural mountain hillsides.

A few years ago, two orchid enthusiasts discovered a rare and previously undiscovered species, known as Platanthera shriveri, or Shriver's Purple Frilly Orchid. 

Nature's Icebox in W.Va.

Jul 31, 2017
Roxy Todd/ WVPB

In Hampshire County West Virginia, there is a small mountain ridge called Ice Mountain. Historical records suggest that, years ago, ice could be found here, even in the heat of summer. I recently visited Ice Mountain to find out if ice could still be spotted, and to check out the rare plant species that have existed here since the last ice age. 


Courtesy Boy Scouts of America

Tens of thousands of boy scouts are making their way to southern West Virginia Wednesday for the start of their national jamboree, but preparations began long before a single scout sets foot on site.

Planning for the 2017 Boy Scouts of America National Jamboree began almost four years ago, immediately following the first jamboree held at the Summit Bechtel National Reserve. 

A faith based organization plans to develop land in West Virginia to create a youth camp. The New River Gorge Regional Development Authority made the announcement earlier this week.

Young Life, a non-denominational Christian organization, plans to build an adventure camp in Nicholas County close to Mt. Nebo.

The organization has 35 camps around the globe according to their website. In a release, Young Life’s state Director, Scott Berg, said it was the outdoor activities, and landscape that attracted the group to West Virginia.


Original image by Alan D. Wilson (edited by Diliff) / wikimedia Commons

West Virginia's hunting seasons for Canada goose and other birds will open Sept. 1.

The Division of Natural Resources says the early Canada goose season will run through Sept. 13.

Hunting seasons for sora and Virginia rails will run through Nov. 8. The common snipe season will end on Dec. 13.

Wwkayaker22 / en.wikipedia.org

  West Virginia is sharing part of more than $43 million in federal funds to help states with parks, outdoor recreation and conservation projects.

The U.S. Department of Interior said West Virginia is getting more than $463,000 from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

The fund was established by Congress in 1964 to ensure access to outdoor recreation resources and to provide money to federal, state and local governments to purchase land, water and wetlands.

National Park Service

The National Park Service is offering Ranger-Guided hikes in Summers and Fayette Counties this holiday weekend. All ranger programs are free unless otherwise noted. The NPS suggests hikers wear comfortable walking shoes. Hikers might also consider bringing water, snacks, camera and binoculars Below is a list of this weekend’s featured ranger programs:

In Summers County, interested hikers should meet at the base of Pipestem Resort State Park tramway at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, July 5, 2014. From there rangers will guide two hikes:

Provided

It’s that time of year again!

For two weeks, beginning Monday, Nov. 25 and ending Saturday, Dec. 2, it’s open season in 51 counties across the state as hunters hit the woods looking for that prize buck.

About 330,000 hunters will participate in West Virginia’s buck firearm season and will spend an estimated $230 million here, particularly in rural areas, but before you hit the woods, the state Division of Natural Resources has some rules and regulations they want you to be aware of: