Older Adults

Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Cheryl Powell lives in senior housing in Nitro. She’s  63 years old and has been receiving Meals on Wheels for a couple of years.

 

“Because I’ve had strokes and different things wrong with my body,” she explained.  

After her strokes, Powell really couldn’t get out to grocery shop. Or go anywhere for that matter.

“I’m blind in this eye and I’m getting cataracts in this one, so it’s hard,” she said.

Adobe Stock

The percentage of West Virginia adults aged 60 and older is growing more rapidly than any other part of the population.  And most of them, like 91-year-old Paige Omohundro, want to stay home as they age.

Adobe Stock

A new study has found that older adults who weren’t sedentary did better on thinking and memory skills tests. Exercise didn’t have to be complicated – it could be walking or even moderately physical housework, but the researchers found that movement may be essential to preserving thinking and memory skills when there are signs of dementia in the brain.

Adobe Stock

A new study has found that the combination of low muscle mass and high fat mass in older adults may be an important predictor in cognitive function later in life. 

Loosing muscle mass is a natural part of aging, as is gaining some weight. But both conditions also have negative impacts on overall health and cognitive function and together they may have a greater threat – surpassing individual impact, according to a new study published today in the journal Clinical Interventions in Aging.

Adobe Stock

Eating a diet rich in vegetables, fruit, nuts and fish may help older adults prevent age-related brain shrinkage. 

The study, published this month in the online medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, suggests that diet can impact brain volume – and people with greater volume have been shown to have better cognitive abilities.

Brain shrinkage is an unavoidable part of aging. But significant brain shrinkage is associated with memory loss and loss of mental sharpness as well as premature death.

Adobe Stock

A new study has found that moderate exercise can reverse heart damage caused by age and a sedentary lifestyle – if it’s begun early enough and performed with enough frequency. 

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern studied a group of about 50 participants over the course of two years.

The study found that in order for exercise to help reverse heart damage, the exercise regimen needs to start before the age of 65 when the heart retains some plasticity – meaning it is still able to remodel itself.

Adobe Stock

A new study has found that sedentary older adults who add less than an hour of moderate physical activity per week can improve overall physical functioning.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 1600 men and women ages 70-89 over an average of 2.6 years. All had problems moving normally at the beginning of the study and most reported fewer than 20 minutes of physical activity a week.