Marijuana

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In southeast Ohio, marijuana was once something officials tried to eliminate. Now officials hope medical marijuana can replace lost jobs and revenue.

The Senate President and House Speaker join us for a conversation about some of the top issues this session, and we take a closer look at medical marijuana with a special report from Senior Statehouse Reporter Dave Mistich.

Don Ryan / AP Photo

An invitation only Wednesday event in Charleston was billed as a symposium on marijuana, but skewed towards opposition of the drug’s legalization for medical and recreational purposes.  The event, titled The Colorado Experiment: A Look Back and What You Need to Know, touched on ecological, medical, public safety and law enforcement positions related to marijuana -- with all of the speakers standing in opposition to reforms that would provide wider access to the drug.

Ted S. Warrem / AP Photo

A federal prosecutor will hold a symposium on marijuana Wednesday in Charleston. The invitation-only event will feature law enforcement officials and researchers opposed to marijuana legalization.

Mike Stuart, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia, is hosting the event alongside a regional task force aimed at curbing drug trafficking. 

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice talks about his budget proposal during a stop on his Save Our State Tour on Thursday, March 3, 2017, at Fairmont State University.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated: Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 10:10 p.m.

 

Gov. Jim Justice and his wife Cathy were involved in a vehicle accident Saturday in Beckley. According to a news release from the governor’s office, the couple were rear ended at an intersection while the governor’s Suburban was stopped at a stop light. Beckley City Police have charged the driver of the vehicle that crashed into the governor’s vehicle with diving under the influence.

A board that will help develop a medical marijuana program in West Virginia is holding its first meeting.

The advisory board is set to meet Wednesday at the University of Charleston. Among the topics for discussion is a work plan for the program's first year. The meeting is open to the public and will include a comment period.

Marijuana
Flickr / eggrole

An advisory board that will help develop a medical marijuana program in West Virginia has been announced, with state Bureau for Public Health Commissioner and State Health Officer Rahul Gupta serving as chairman.

A dozen others were also named to the board, including physicians, pharmacists, social worker, prosecutor, patient advocate and horticulturalist.

Two men who say they're college students in West Virginia face charges after 4 pounds (1.81 kilograms) of high-grade marijuana were mailed to a former fraternity house.

The Herald-Dispatch reports 19-year-old Eric Nguyen and 23-year-old Andrew Gifford were arrested shortly after the package was delivered Wednesday to a Huntington residence that housed Marshall University's local Pi Kappa Phi chapter. According to criminal complaints from Cabell County Magistrate Court, both men told a judge they attended the university, which the university hasn't confirmed.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill to legalize medical marijuana in West Virginia is heading to Gov. Jim Justice for a signature.

Members of the House accepted Senate technical amendments to the bill Thursday night, sending it on for gubernatorial approval. 

Tim Armstead, Steve Harrison
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The House of Delegates has passed a Senate bill that would legalize medical marijuana in the state. But the bill has seen a number of changes since the 28 to 6 vote last week in the upper chamber.

John Shott
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill to legalize medical marijuana will be put to a vote in the House of Delegates Tuesday. Over the weekend, a handful of delegates from both sides of the aisle met with attorneys to discuss potential amendments to the Senate bill that were discussed in a late night floor session Monday. The bill has now taken a much different form than when it was approved in the state Senate just last week.

Tim Miley
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill to legalize medical marijuana in the state is bypassing the committee process, putting it on the fast track for a vote in the House. Senate Bill 386 was read for a first time on the floor Thursday night after a 54 to 40 procedural vote to bring it straight to the floor.

The vote has been called historic in the chamber. But several delegates argued pulling the bill out of the committee process was the only way members would get to put the medical marijuana bill to a vote this session.

Mike Folk
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A senate bill to legalize medical marijuana in the state is being fast-tracked through the West Virginia House of Delegates. Senate Bill 386, which passed out of the state Senate Wednesday night on a 28 to 6 vote, would create the West Virginia Medical Cannabis Act, legalizing medical marijuana in West Virginia.

Perry Bennet / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Democrats in the House of Delegates Thursday attempted to change the scheduling classification of marijuana so it could be prescribed by doctors.

House Bill 2526 focuses on adding drugs to the state’s scheduling system, a classification of both prescription and illicit drugs. These classifications are referred to as Schedule I, II, IV, and V.

Muscular dystrophy patient Joe Brumfield wanted a safer alternative to the opioid painkillers he was prescribed.
Aaron Payne / Ohio Valley ReSource

As the opioid epidemic continues to plague the Ohio Valley with addiction and death, the search for safer methods of pain management has become increasingly urgent.

Advocates for medical marijuana have recently made inroads in the area with growing scientific evidence that the substance currently considered of no medical value by the federal government might be a tool to wean those suffering from chronic pain off of more dangerous drugs.

Marijuana
Flickr / eggrole

Police say an Ohio County man has admitted to having grown marijuana on his property for about 40 years.

The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register reports that 66-year-old Ronald H. Tominack of Triadelphia was arrested Monday and charged with possession with intent to deliver marijuana.

According to a criminal complaint, authorities say a state police airplane spotted what appeared to be marijuana plants growing on Tominack's property while Tominack was sitting in a hot tub behind his residence.

West Virginia Regional Jail Authority

A Pennsylvania man who wrecked an SUV on a West Virginia highway while carrying live chickens, improvised explosives and guns pleaded not guilty to a weapons charge Tuesday.

Police say 21-year-old Seth Grim of Emmaus, Pennsylvania, was driving south along Interstate 79 about 30 miles northeast of Charleston when he lost control of his Ford Explorer on Aug. 22 and wrecked. State police found 30 chickens, improvised explosive devices, a dog, marijuana, ammunition, and two AK-47-style rifles at the scene. The dog didn't survive.

Marijuana
Flickr / eggrole

Arrest figures show that a majority of drug arrests in West Virginia are for marijuana.

A review of West Virginia drug arrests by The Charleston Gazette shows that more than half have been for marijuana since 2000.

Charleston police Lt. Chad Napier says marijuana is one of the most commonly abused drugs. He says people arrested for other crimes often have marijuana in their possession.

Katelyn Sykes / WCHS-TV

West Virginia State Police say altered fireworks, weapons, chickens and marijuana were found inside an SUV that wrecked on Interstate 79, and the driver from Pennsylvania has been arrested.

Police say a Ford Explorer carrying dozens of chickens flipped in Roane County about 3:30 a.m. Friday.

Marijuana
Flickr / eggrole

Authorities in western Illinois say they've seized around 145 pounds of marijuana from a 68-year-old West Virginia man passing through the area.

Galesburg Police say the value of the drugs is between $300,000 and $500,000.

Marijuana
Flickr / eggrole

West Virginia businesses couldn't sell bongs, bowls, mini spoons or other items marketed for illegal drug use under a proposal passed by the House of Delegates.
 
House lawmakers voted 94-2 Wednesday to make intentionally selling drug paraphernalia in West Virginia a misdemeanor, punishable by up to $5,000 in fines and six months to a year in jail. The Senate will consider the bill next.