Manufacturing Equipment and Inventory Tax

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020 at 6:05 p.m.

A controversial and sweeping tax reform overhaul met its demise Tuesday in the West Virginia Senate when the second — and most essential — part of a two-pronged plan to wipe out tangible personal property taxes was rejected. While the Republican-led chamber had already passed the details of the proposal, they failed to pull enough votes to allow it to have a chance at becoming constitutional.

Will Price / West Virginia Le

A two-pronged tax overhaul got halfway completed Monday in the West Virginia Senate. The sweeping proposal — which includes a repeal of hundreds of millions of dollars in personal property taxes on manufacturing, motor vehicles and other personal property, as well as hikes on tobacco and sales taxes — is the combination of a bill and a proposed constitutional amendment that allows for all of the proposed changes to take effect.

The West Virginia Legislature has completed its third full week of the 2020 session. Several issues have stirred up debate so far, including a bill that would repeal a tax on manufacturing equipment and inventory and another that would create an Intermediate Court of Appeals. We bring you the latest on these issues and more on this week’s reporter roundtable.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The introduction of a proposed state constitutional amendment that would repeal a tax on manufacturing equipment and Inventory sparked conversation Tuesday in the West Virginia Senate. 

Senate Joint Resolution 8, titled the “Manufacturing Growth Amendment,” was introduced Tuesday in the Senate. Such an effort has become a perennial issue in recent years — and offered in various forms — under the GOP-controlled legislature, but has yet to clear both chambers.