Logging

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, The Legislature Today host Andrea Lannom speaks with Barry Cook, director of the West Virginia Division of Forestry to talk about a controversial bill that would open many state parks to logging.

On The Legislature Today, we take a closer look at a bill that would allow logging in state parks – Senate Bill 270. It's an issue that's fired up lawmakers and citizens. We’ll hear from a director, a commissioner, a delegate, and a senator. Logging is currently permitted in state forests but not state parks.

Logs Logging
GeographBot / wikimedia commons

Gov. Jim Justice's administration has proposed opening West Virginia's state parks to logging.

Legislation introduced by the Senate's Republican and Democratic leaders at Justice's request would authorize the Division of Natural Resources to implement "a sound silvicultural management plan."

Jean Snedegar

Most of the state’s trees are harvested by small-scale logging operations, using chainsaws, but a growing number of logging companies use large, mechanized logging machines that can do much more, faster.

Jean Snedegar joined veteran logger Jerry Huffman on Knobley Mountain, in Grant County.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, most trees harvested in West Virginia are collected by small-scale logging operations with chain saws. But a growing number of companies use large, mechanized logging machines. In the next part of our occasional series on the timber industry, Jean Snedegar joins veteran logger Jerry Huffman on a job on Knobley Mountain, in Grant County.

Also this morning, we hear from 38-year-old Dave Hathaway, a laid-off coal miner. His story is part of our Struggle to Stay series, where we follow six people as they wrestle with the decision, do I stay or do I go? Unlike many others Dave is determined to STAY in Appalachia.

The Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier went to visit him at his home in Greene County, Pennsylvania, just after his new baby was born to hear how his job search is going.

Jean Snedegar

Halfway between Mill Creek and Helvetia, West Virginia, four miles or so off the main road, Scotty Cook, the owner of a small-scale logging operation in Elkins, trudges along a muddy, deep gullied logging road. 

Cook has been working in the industry for about 20 years and got started because of his family.

"My dad and them, they [were] in it all their lives," he said. "Tradition I suppose."

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, most of the state’s trees are harvested by small-scale logging operations, like the one owned by Scotty Cook in Elkins.  

Producer Jean Snedegar joins Cook on his latest job in a remote area of southern Randolph County.  

Occupational Safety & Health Administration, OSHA
Occupational Safety & Health Administration

 

  Federal regulators have cited a logging company for 22 serious worker safety violations.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration says Ray Clearing Inc. of Bickmore also was issued one other-than-serious citations. The citations stem from an inspection by OSHA's Charleston Area Office at a site in Cabin Creek on Aug. 4.