Lead Poisoning

Lead-based paint was extremely popular in the early and mid-20th century — used in an estimated 38 million homes across the U.S. before it was banned for residential use in 1978.

Kara Lofton / WVPB

The most common way children are exposed to lead these days is from the lead-based paint almost universally found in homes built before 1980. (Lead-based paint was outlawed in the late ’70s.)

When the paint deteriorates and chips, it causes dust particles that can be inhaled or even eaten (think slobbery teething toy belonging to a 10-month-old on the floor next to an old baseboard covered in lead-based paint).

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Appalachia Health News reporter Kara Lofton looks at childhood lead poisoning and state efforts to combat it. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Black Vulture
Shannon Behmke

    

A new study out of West Virginia University finds that lead poisoning in vultures is way more prevalent than expected. Researchers say the source of the lead is ammunition and coal-fired power plant emissions - prompting one researcher to liken vultures to the canaries miners once used to gauge if a coal mine was safe or not.


NPR Teaches Diversity in News

Apr 7, 2015
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Beth Vorhees sits down with the NPR Diversity Team to talk about NPR’s initiative to bring a variety of voices to its coverage.  And Glynis Board reports on a new study from WVU about power plant emissions and it’s effect on vultures.