Katherine Johnson

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, debates nationally and globally rage on about high-speed data coverage and which country will control it, while in West Virginia, many residents are still looking for any reliable connection at all. We hear how that affects schools and communities.

nasa.gov

The West Virginia woman behind much of NASA’s 20th century space accomplishments died Monday at 101 years old. 


Katherine Johnson, a mathematician who was one of NASA's human "computers" and an unsung hero of the space agency's early days, died Monday. She calculated the flight path for America's first crewed space mission and moon landing, and she was among the women profiled in the book and movie Hidden Figures. She was 101.

Her death was announced by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine.

NASA

West Virginia State University has honored NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson with a bronze statue and scholarship dedication on the eve of her 100th birthday.

Six of Johnson's grandchildren revealed the statue during a ceremony Saturday on the West Virginia State campus in Institute.

The university also awarded a scholarship in Johnson's name to two students majoring in science, technology, engineering and math.

Johnson turned 100 on Sunday. She graduated from the school in 1937 at age 18 with bachelor's degrees in mathematics and French.

Hidden Figures
Arthur Mola / AP

A West Virginia native is one of the elite team of female African-American mathematicians at NASA featured in a new film, "Hidden Figures."

The Herald-Dispatch in Huntington reports the film tells the story of West Virginia State University graduate Katherine Johnson, now in her 90s, who helped win the space race against the Soviet Union. She is played by "Empire" star Taraji P. Henson.