Iran

America and Iran used to be close allies, but since the Iranian Revolution began in 1979, the relationship has been akin to a bad divorce. After President Trump’s announcement to pull the U.S. out of the Iran Nuclear Deal, cable news has been abuzz with political pundits and foreign policy scholars reacting to the latest chapter of the tortured relationship. But there are Iranian and American love stories that have worked out.

Us & Them

"In the beginning of the so-called revolution, there was no talk of overthrowing the regime. When it started, there was some political oppression by the government, the shah. But socially, there were a lot of freedom, people could do anything, even you could criticize the government, but not the shah himself."

The U.S. and five of its allies have reached a deal with Iran over its nuclear program. The deal will limit the country’s ability to enrich uranium and opens Iran up to international inspections.

The agreement was reached by diplomats from seven countries, including U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, in the hopes of preventing Iran from enriching enough uranium to create a nuclear weapon, but the deal will still have to receive approval from Congress before taking effect.

Economic sanctions against Iran would be phased out as part of the deal, but West Virginia’s Senatorial delegation is hesitant to say if they will support the agreement.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Senator Shelley Moore-Capito joined with 46 other senators this month in signing an open letter to the Islamic Republic of Iran. In a news conference earlier this week, Capito commented on the action calling the letter "straight forward," and not a significant move.