Impeachment

Trump Criticizes West Virginia's Manchin On Impeachment Votes

Feb 8, 2020
Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

President Donald Trump on Friday criticized Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia for voting guilty on two articles of impeachment, aiming to weaken the senator’s political standing in a state Trump carried by a whopping 42 percentage points in 2016.

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., speaks with reporters after President Donald Trump was acquitted in an impeachment trial on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020.
Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

West Virginia U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin, often seen as one of the most moderate and Trump-friendly Democrats in the Senate, voted Wednesday along party lines to convict President Donald Trump on both Articles of Impeachment. 

While the 67-vote threshold for convicting the president was viewed as nearly insurmountable with Republicans holding a 53 seat majority in the Senate, Manchin remained undecided about how he would vote until Wednesday. 

Updated at 5:43 p.m. ET

Senators voted on Wednesday afternoon to acquit President Trump on two articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — after a historically unusual but typically contentious trial.

Forty-eight senators supported a verdict of guilty on Article I; 52 voted not guilty. Forty-seven senators supported a verdict of guilty on Article II; 53 voted not guilty. The Senate would have needed 67 votes to convict Trump on either article.

Updated at 8:00 p.m. ET

The Senate impeachment trial adjourned Friday evening, with a plan to return Monday morning to continue. Closing arguments will be presented Monday, after which senators will be permitted to speak on the floor. A final vote, during which President Trump is expected to be acquitted, is expected next Wednesday around 4 p.m. ET.

Updated at 1:20 a.m. ET

Democrats are pressing the Senate to call former national security adviser John Bolton to testify in President Trump's impeachment trial following a new report that House impeachment managers describe as "explosive."

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives has delivered articles of impeachment against President Trump to the Senate, which is expected to begin a trial next week.

Earlier in the day, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named seven Democratic members of Congress as the managers who will argue the case for impeachment.

Those managers brought the articles to the Senate on Wednesday evening.

@RepAlexMooney / via Twitter

West Virginia’s congressional delegation in the House of Representatives all voted against the impeachment of President Donald Trump. 

Republicans David McKinley, Alex Mooney and Carol Miller — who represent West Virginia’s first, second and third districts, respectively — each voted against both articles of impeachment against Trump. 

House Television / via AP

This is a developing story and may be updated.

Debate continues on the floor of the U.S. House on whether to impeach President Donald Trump — and West Virginia’s delegation is expected to oppose the articles and support the president. 

Rep. Carol Miller, a Republican who represents West Virginia’s 3rd Congressional District, spoke on the floor early in Wednesday’s debate.

Updated at 8:56 p.m. ET

President Trump is now just the third president in American history to be impeached.

Lawmakers passed two articles of impeachment against Trump. The first article, which charges Trump with abuse of power, was approved largely along a party-line vote, 230-197-1. The second article, on obstructing Congress, passed 229-198-1.

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, charging him with abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress.

Read the articles of impeachment here.

Updated at 8:01 p.m. ET

As the House impeachment inquiry moves this week from the fact-gathering stage in the Intelligence Committee to considerations of law in the Judiciary Committee, the White House says President Trump does not intend to participate in a Wednesday hearing.

The marathon of testimony in Democrats' impeachment inquiry this week confirmed that the Ukraine affair, like so many earlier subplots in the era of President Trump, boils down to two big questions:

What do the president's words mean? Can the president do what he did?

The answers to those questions have been a partisan inkblot test since Trump exploded onto the political scene, and now they are burning again as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats decide how they'll move ahead in a showdown over impeachment.

In recent days, President Trump and his allies have amplified their calls for the whistleblower who sparked the impeachment inquiry to be identified, presenting the question of whether it would be a crime for the president to unmask the anonymous whistleblower.

According to four former top federal government officials who worked in intelligence and national security, the answer is no.

@RepAlexMooney / Twitter

A Republican congressman from West Virginia who took part in a Wednesday protest of an ongoing impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump is defending his actions. Rep. Alex Mooney was one of dozens of Republican lawmakers who made their way into a secure room where a scheduled deposition was delayed. 

Updated at 4:29 p.m. ET

Republican members of Congress disrupted the closed-door proceedings of the House impeachment inquiry, preventing a Pentagon official from giving her testimony.

Arguing that the inquiry's interviews should not be held behind closed doors, GOP lawmakers entered the secure area in the Capitol Wednesday where witnesses are typically questioned.

Updated at 8:45 p.m. ET

The White House will not participate in Congress' ongoing impeachment inquiry, it said Tuesday, stepping up a political and legal standoff between the executive and legislative branches of government.

In a blistering eight-page letter to Democratic congressional leaders, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, White House counsel Pat Cipollone repeatedly mocked the Democrats' process.

Updated at 7:48 p.m. ET

After months of expressing caution on a push for impeachment, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi launched a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump Tuesday.

"The president must be held accountable," Pelosi said. "No one is above the law."

The landmark move comes after controversy over a phone call Trump had with the newly elected Ukrainian leader in July and reporting that the president pressured him to investigate political rival Joe Biden.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore breastfeeding, we hear the latest from the statehouse, and we bring you this week’s Mountain Stage “Song of the Week.”

The west face of the Supreme Court of the United States is seen in this general view. Monday, March 11, 2019, in Washington D.C.
Mark Tenally / AP Photo

The West Virginia House of Delegates has filed a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in a case attempting to overturn a decision by the state’s high court that dismissed impeachment cases last year.

The west face of the Supreme Court of the United States is seen in this general view. Monday, March 11, 2019, in Washington D.C.
Mark Tenally / AP Photo

An attorney for a West Virginia Supreme Court justice is arguing that the U.S. Supreme Court should not take up the question of how states allocate power among their branches of government.

The West Virginia Supreme Court chamber.
West Virginia Judiciary

The West Virginia Senate has passed a resolution that would let state voters decide whether to prohibit state courts from interfering in impeachment proceedings.

The Senate sent the resolution on a proposed constitutional amendment to the House of Delegates on a 27-6 vote Monday.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

The leader of West Virginia's Senate said he's mulling his options after the state Supreme Court refused to revisit a ruling that halted the impeachment process of several justices.

Allen Loughry
Steve Helber / AP Photo

Suspended state Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry has stepped down following a nearly year-long scandal and a federal conviction. His resignation from the bench comes just days before lawmakers were again set to consider the embattled justice’s impeachment.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

Gov. Jim Justice has called a special session of the West Virginia Legislature to again consider the impeachment of suspended state Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry.

Lawmakers will return to the matter Tuesday. They will already be in Charleston for their monthly interim committee meetings.

Allen Loughry
Steve Helber / AP Photo

A suspended West Virginia Supreme Court justice who was convicted of 11 federal criminal charges has requested a new trial.

The West Virginia Supreme Court chamber.
West Virginia Judiciary

West Virginia's Supreme Court has effectively halted the legislature's remaining efforts to impeach the state's justices as a violation of the separation of powers doctrine.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A temporary bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals has issued an order that effectively halts pending impeachment trials for two other justices of the state’s high court. The order follows an opinion that blocked the impeachment trial of Chief Justice Margaret Workman.

WV Supreme Court of Appeals

The West Virginia Supreme Court justice who resigned before his colleagues were impeached can no longer practice law in the state.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reported Wednesday the state Supreme Court formally annulled Menis Ketchum's license to practice law in an Oct. 4 order.

Allen Loughry
Steve Helber / AP Photo

A West Virginia judicial conduct board has reinstated proceedings against convicted state Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Gov. Jim Justice says he isn’t planning to call the Legislature back into session to address pending impeachment trials after a temporary bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court halted the trial of the state’s chief justice.

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