Impeachment

Updated at 8:01 p.m. ET

As the House impeachment inquiry moves this week from the fact-gathering stage in the Intelligence Committee to considerations of law in the Judiciary Committee, the White House says President Trump does not intend to participate in a Wednesday hearing.

The marathon of testimony in Democrats' impeachment inquiry this week confirmed that the Ukraine affair, like so many earlier subplots in the era of President Trump, boils down to two big questions:

What do the president's words mean? Can the president do what he did?

The answers to those questions have been a partisan inkblot test since Trump exploded onto the political scene, and now they are burning again as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats decide how they'll move ahead in a showdown over impeachment.

In recent days, President Trump and his allies have amplified their calls for the whistleblower who sparked the impeachment inquiry to be identified, presenting the question of whether it would be a crime for the president to unmask the anonymous whistleblower.

According to four former top federal government officials who worked in intelligence and national security, the answer is no.

@RepAlexMooney / Twitter

A Republican congressman from West Virginia who took part in a Wednesday protest of an ongoing impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump is defending his actions. Rep. Alex Mooney was one of dozens of Republican lawmakers who made their way into a secure room where a scheduled deposition was delayed. 

Updated at 4:29 p.m. ET

Republican members of Congress disrupted the closed-door proceedings of the House impeachment inquiry, preventing a Pentagon official from giving her testimony.

Arguing that the inquiry's interviews should not be held behind closed doors, GOP lawmakers entered the secure area in the Capitol Wednesday where witnesses are typically questioned.

Updated at 8:45 p.m. ET

The White House will not participate in Congress' ongoing impeachment inquiry, it said Tuesday, stepping up a political and legal standoff between the executive and legislative branches of government.

In a blistering eight-page letter to Democratic congressional leaders, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, White House counsel Pat Cipollone repeatedly mocked the Democrats' process.

Updated at 7:48 p.m. ET

After months of expressing caution on a push for impeachment, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi launched a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump Tuesday.

"The president must be held accountable," Pelosi said. "No one is above the law."

The landmark move comes after controversy over a phone call Trump had with the newly elected Ukrainian leader in July and reporting that the president pressured him to investigate political rival Joe Biden.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore breastfeeding, we hear the latest from the statehouse, and we bring you this week’s Mountain Stage “Song of the Week.”

The west face of the Supreme Court of the United States is seen in this general view. Monday, March 11, 2019, in Washington D.C.
Mark Tenally / AP Photo

The West Virginia House of Delegates has filed a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in a case attempting to overturn a decision by the state’s high court that dismissed impeachment cases last year.

The west face of the Supreme Court of the United States is seen in this general view. Monday, March 11, 2019, in Washington D.C.
Mark Tenally / AP Photo

An attorney for a West Virginia Supreme Court justice is arguing that the U.S. Supreme Court should not take up the question of how states allocate power among their branches of government.

The West Virginia Supreme Court chamber.
West Virginia Judiciary

The West Virginia Senate has passed a resolution that would let state voters decide whether to prohibit state courts from interfering in impeachment proceedings.

The Senate sent the resolution on a proposed constitutional amendment to the House of Delegates on a 27-6 vote Monday.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

The leader of West Virginia's Senate said he's mulling his options after the state Supreme Court refused to revisit a ruling that halted the impeachment process of several justices.

Allen Loughry
Steve Helber / AP Photo

Suspended state Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry has stepped down following a nearly year-long scandal and a federal conviction. His resignation from the bench comes just days before lawmakers were again set to consider the embattled justice’s impeachment.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

Gov. Jim Justice has called a special session of the West Virginia Legislature to again consider the impeachment of suspended state Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry.

Lawmakers will return to the matter Tuesday. They will already be in Charleston for their monthly interim committee meetings.

Allen Loughry
Steve Helber / AP Photo

A suspended West Virginia Supreme Court justice who was convicted of 11 federal criminal charges has requested a new trial.

The West Virginia Supreme Court chamber.
West Virginia Judiciary

West Virginia's Supreme Court has effectively halted the legislature's remaining efforts to impeach the state's justices as a violation of the separation of powers doctrine.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A temporary bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals has issued an order that effectively halts pending impeachment trials for two other justices of the state’s high court. The order follows an opinion that blocked the impeachment trial of Chief Justice Margaret Workman.

WV Supreme Court of Appeals

The West Virginia Supreme Court justice who resigned before his colleagues were impeached can no longer practice law in the state.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reported Wednesday the state Supreme Court formally annulled Menis Ketchum's license to practice law in an Oct. 4 order.

Allen Loughry
Steve Helber / AP Photo

A West Virginia judicial conduct board has reinstated proceedings against convicted state Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Gov. Jim Justice says he isn’t planning to call the Legislature back into session to address pending impeachment trials after a temporary bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court halted the trial of the state’s chief justice.

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear from a young woman who shares one of the most difficult experiences she’s faced – losing a loved one to a drug overdose; a conversation about loss, faith, and love as we continue hearing the conversations recorded by StoryCorps in West Virginia.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A West Virginia Supreme Court justice standing trial in the Court of Impeachment expressed regret for her role in a nearly year-long scandal involving spending while asserting that she doesn’t feel she should be removed from office. Senators, acting as jurors, heard testimony from four witnesses in the trial of Justice Beth Walker as proceedings kicked off Monday.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated: Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018 at 5:28 p.m.

 

West Virginia’s House Minority Whip is requesting the governor to call the legislature back into session to consider impeaching a former state Supreme Court justice who was not included in earlier proceedings.

 

In a Thursday letter, Del. Mike Caputo asked the Gov. Jim Justice to bring lawmakers back to Charleston to consider impeaching former Justice Menis Ketchum.

Judge Paul Farrell, presides over the Senate as senators are sworn in during a pre-trial impeachment conference for four impeached Supreme Court justices in the West Virginia State Senate chambers at the Capitol in Charleston, Sept. 11, 2018
Steve Helber / AP Photo


Updated: Sept. 11, 2018 at 3:55 p.m.

Pre-trial impeachment proceedings in the West Virginia Senate kicked off Tuesday with a roller coaster that still leaves all four impeached justices standing trial.

An offer to publicly reprimand Chief Justice Margaret Workman and Justice Beth Walker was ruled out of order. Additionally, a motion to dismiss articles of impeachment against now-retired Justice Robin Davis was rejected by the Senate.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Two West Virginia Supreme Court justices awaiting impeachment trials have filed motions with the state Senate ahead of pre-trial proceedings. Attorneys for Chief Justice Margaret Workman and Justice Beth Walker filed motions with the Senate Clerk's office Friday, with Workman asking for her trial to begin after mid-October and Walker asking for her case to be dismissed altogether.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate has begun its part in the impeachment of West Virginia Supreme Court justices. The chamber gaveled in Monday and adopted rules of procedure that will dictate the Court of Impeachment.

Thorney Lieberman / West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

This is a developing list. Please check back for more details.

Last updated on Aug. 21, 2018 at 2:46 p.m.

Two West Virginia Supreme Court seats will appear on the midterm election ballot later this fall.

West Virginians have until midnight on Aug. 21 to file for either seat. Voters will decide on Nov. 6 who fills those seats.

Copyright 2018 West Virginia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Margaret Workman
Courtesy West Virginia Press Association

Two justices of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals say they will not resign, despite being impeached by the House of Delegates.

The Tuesday announcements from Chief Justice Margaret Workman and Justice Beth Walker came hours before a deadline that would trigger a November special election to fill the remainder of any terms left by vacancies. Their statements followed the resignation of another justice Tuesday.

W.Va. Supreme Court Justice Robin Davis announcing her retirement on August 14, 2018.
West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Following the impeachment of all four remaining justices on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, Justice Robin Davis has announced her retirement. She made the annoucement Tuesday morning in the court chambers. Her retirement is effective Monday, August 13.

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