Hurricane Florence

Updated at 3:55 a.m. ET on Monday

Tropical Depression Florence is continuing to bring relentless, torrential rain to much of the South. Florence has already set a record for rainfall in the state of North Carolina, and thousands have evacuated to shelters in North and South Carolina to ride out the storm.

More than 500,000 remain without electricity in North Carolina.

Steve Herber / Associated Press

As rainfall from Hurricane Florence makes its way into West Virginia, Major Nate King with the West Virginia National Guard said the agency is monitoring the risk of flash flooding across the state over the next two days. 2-3 inches of rain is forcasted in the high mountains, and 1-2 inches is forecasted for much of the state, King said.

Updated 11:40 a.m. ET Sunday

Florence weakened to a tropical depression Sunday morning, the National Hurricane Center said, but flooding continued to be a major danger throughout the Carolinas.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said the storm is more dangerous now than when it made landfall. "Flood waters are still raging across parts of our state, and the risk to life is rising with the angry waters," Cooper said in a news conference on Sunday.

"The threat of flooded roads keeps spreading," Cooper continued.

Oglebay Park, Oglebay Mansion
BotMultichillT / wikimedia commons

A West Virginia resort is offering shelter for people who have had to leave their homes because of Hurricane Florence.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET Saturday

Tropical Storm Florence is still a slow-moving giant that poses danger to people in North and South Carolina, as its storm surge and intense rains bring high floodwaters to towns both on the coast and inland.

The storm has been linked to at least five deaths, a toll that is expected to climb.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore the black market -- not of opioids, but of medication to treat opioid addiction. We also bring you an update on Hurricane Florence’s potential impact here in the Mountain State, and we learn the latest on a CSX train derailment in Fayette County.

Updated at 5:10 a.m. ET on Thursday

The outer rain bands of Hurricane Florence were beginning to be felt in North Carolina, according to the National Hurricane Center, as the Category 2 storm, with sustained winds of 110 mph and the likelihood of "life-threatening storm surge and rainfall," ranged closer to a landfall.

In this Saturday, June 25, 2016 file photo, Lt. Dennis Feazell, of the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources, watches for debris as he and a co-worker search flooded homes in Rainelle, W.Va.
Steve Helber / AP file photo

Hours inland from the U.S. East Coast in mountain communities and narrow river valleys of Appalachia, angst is building with the approach of Hurricane Florence.

A series of thunderstorms pelted a wide swath of West Virginia two years ago. Nine inches of rain fell in 36 hours in some areas in June 2016, leaving 23 dead statewide and destroying thousands of homes, businesses and infrastructure.

This photo provided by NASA shows Hurricane Florence from the International Space Station on Monday, Sept. 10, 2018, as it threatens the U.S. East Coast.
NASA via AP

Mandatory evacuations were imposed for parts of three East Coast states Tuesday as millions of Americans prepared for what could become one of the most catastrophic hurricanes to hit the Eastern Seaboard in decades.

For many people, the challenge could be finding a safe refuge: If Florence slows to a crawl just off the coast, it could bring torrential rains all the way into the Appalachian mountains and as far away as West Virginia, causing flash floods, mudslides and other dangerous conditions in places that don’t usually get much tropical weather.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Both the Northern and Eastern Panhandles are experiencing flooding this week as rain continues to fall on the two regions. Preparations are also being made across the state to respond to possible heavy rainfall from Hurricane Florence at the end of the week.

Updated at 5 a.m. ET on Tuesday

Hurricane Florence is growing in size and strength as it barrels toward the Southeastern U.S. for an expected landfall in the Carolinas later this week as an "extremely dangerous hurricane," according to the National Hurricane Center.