Holocaust

Detainees are seen outside tent shelters used to hold separated family members, Friday, June 22, in Fabens, Texas.
Matt York / AP Photo

U.S. immigration policies are very much in the spotlight recently with reports on conditions at some of the southern border detention camps and fresh concerns about children being held apart from their parents.

VIDEO: A W.Va. Community Responds to Religious Violence of Past and Present

May 7, 2019
Bobby Lee Messer

One Appalachian community is responding to violence of the past and present targeted at religious groups.

At their annual reading of the names ceremony, the B’Nai Shalom Synagogue in Huntington, West Virginia, brought together community members in a ceremony to remember victims of the Holocaust.

Just a few blocks away, community activists gathered to also honor the victims of the Easter suicide bombings in Sri Lanka.

The remembrances came the same day as the latest attack on the Jewish community in America– a shooting at a California synagogue.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On Sunday, April 15, Temple Beth El and the Beckley community will gather at WVU Tech to remember those who were killed during the Holocaust. On this West Virginia Morning, Alderson Broaddus journalism student Lora Owston reports the annual event was inspired by the story of the late Max Lewin, who moved Beckley after escaping the horrors of the holocaust himself.

WVPublic

Each year for the past 17 years in Morgantown, WVU Hillel together with faculty and community remember the Holocaust by reading names of victims for 24 continuous hours. Students and community members get through about 10,000 names each year. At that rate, if they had access to all the names of the 11 million victims, the annual tradition would continue for about 1,000 years more. Organizers say they work to humanize the victims in an effort to remember the depths to which humanity can sink.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

    

Volume Six of Shepherd University's Anthology of Appalachian Writers is set to be released in April. Former NBA assistant coach and former Herd player Dan D'Antoni is introduced as the new head coach for Marshall University's Men's basketball team. Also, we remember the Holocaust by revisiting a story on Dr. Edith Levy and have a listen to an audio postcard from a recent event at West Virginia University. 

On America’s Test Kitchen, we speak to Cara De Silva, the editor of In Memory's Kitchen: A Legacy from the Women of Terezin, a cookbook written by starving women in the Czechoslovakian ghetto/concentration camp of Theresienstadt. Find out how these brave women used their culinary heritage as an act of defiance by talking about food and trading recipes.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Child advocacy groups question Gov. Tomblin's budget prioroties. Our Story of the Jews radio series continues with Dr. Edith Levy, a survivor of the Holocaust who's lived in Morgantown since the 1950s, recalls her life and work in reminding people of the harsh realities of what happened.

As national Holocaust Day of Remembrance approached, 92 year old Holocaust survivor Daniel Kereth said years on the run and in prison were life-defining.

As Kereth prepared to speak at a remembrance ceremony at Mountain State University in 2011, Suzanne Higgins visited him in his home in Bluefield.

  

Suzanne Higgins

Between the 1880’s and 1920’s there was an intersection of two historical phenomena in Appalachia. The railroads opened the region for the large scale extraction of coal and Jews from Eastern Europe came to the United States seeking opportunity.

In her book “Coalfield Jews: An Appalachian History,” Deborah Weiner writes “…their story is treated here as Jewish History and as Appalachian history, in equal measure.  The linkages that emerge between these two seemingly unrelated fields help to illuminate both.”