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AP file photo

State authorities are urging West Virginians to prepare for the upcoming hurricane season, even if they’re miles away from the nearest coastline. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

More than a hundred coal miners and family members gathered Wednesday in Whitesburg, Kentucky, in an attempt to get their pay from failed mining company Blackjewel. The country’s sixth-largest coal company filed bankruptcy last week, and many of Blackjewel’s 1,100 workers across Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia are suddenly out of work. As Brittany Patterson reports, most are still waiting for back wages as well as answers about the company’s future.

Julio Cortez / AP Photo

Despite legislation from 2017 that allowed cannabis to be legal for medical use on July 1 of this year, West Virginia officials say they’re still years away from the first sale. That’s -- at least in part -- because of a hangup with finding a banking solution to get around federal law. State health officials say they also have to implement permitting and licensing for patients and those who want to start businesses within the industry. 

Minimum Wage Hike Would Have Major Effect in Ohio Valley

Jul 10, 2019
students and other supporters protest in 2015 on the University of Washington campus in Seattle, in support of raising the minimum wage for campus workers to $15 an hour.
AP file photo

A new report from the Congressional Budget Office shows increasing the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour would boost the wages of 17 million workers and lift about 1.3 million people out of poverty. But the CBO warns that could also result in more than one million lost jobs and could diminish overall income for others.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, despite legislation passed in 2017 that allowed cannabis to be legal for medical use in West Virginia, officials say they’re still years away from the first sale. That’s -- at least in part -- because of a hangup with finding a banking solution to get around federal law.

State health officials say they also have to implement permitting and licensing for patients and those who want to start businesses within the industry. Dave Mistich gives us a look at the stalled program and what’s needed to get it off the ground.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice, left, first lady Melania Trump, center, and Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan, right, listen as Huntington Police Chief Hank Dial, speaks at Cabell-Huntington Health Center in Huntington, WVa., July 8, 2019
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

First lady Melania Trump visited West Virginia on Monday to learn how a city at the center of the nation’s opioid epidemic is grappling with the crisis.

She met with federal, state and local officials in Huntington and heard how the area’s police, schools and health care centers are trying to fight the opioid scourge.

A young voter exits a polling place.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

More than 15,600 high school seniors in West Virginia registered to vote during the 2018-2019 school year.

Marina Riker / AP Photo

Despite legislation that called for West Virginia’s medical cannabis program to launch this week, state health officials say they’re still years away from the first sale in the state. One reason for the delay has been the state's need for a third-party vendor to handle banking services. 

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West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice said Sunday, June 30, he will declare a state of emergency for a handful of northeastern counties after severe thunderstorms on Saturday caused flash flooding, knocking homes off their foundations and washing out roads. 

 

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice signed an omnibus education reform bill] on Friday, June 28, that will lead to the state’s first charter schools.

House Bill 206 allows for three charter schools in the 2021-2022 academic year, with approval from the charters’ respective county boards of education. The bill allows for three more charters every three years, beginning in 2023.

Updated at 11:55 a.m. ET Saturday

A federal judge in California has blocked President Trump from using $2.5 billion in military funding to build a southern border wall.

The Trump administration sought to tap Department of Defense money to support the construction of portions of the president's long-promised border wall stretching across large swaths of the Mexican border with New Mexico, Arizona and California.

Updated at 6:32 p.m. ET

The man who drove his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville, Va., killing one person and injuring 35 has been sentenced to spending the rest of his life in prison.

A federal judge issued the sentence of life without the possibility of parole on Friday for self-proclaimed neo-Nazi James Fields Jr., 22, of the Toledo, Ohio, area.

West Virginia's now-defunct film tax credit was around for ten years before being eliminated by the West Virginia Legislature in 2018. A legislative audit report found it provided "minimal economic impact" to the state.
Daniel Walker

West Virginia’s film tax credit was eliminated by the West Virginia Legislature in 2018 after a legislative audit report deemed the credit as providing only “minimal economic impact.” But people who work in the film industry don’t agree. An attempt to resurrect the credit failed this past session, but supporters are hopeful it will make it through the next legislative session.

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More than 1,400 bridges across West Virginia are in “poor” condition, according to the Federal Highway Administration. According to a new report by the agency, 1,444 bridges in the state, or nearly 20 percent, are in disrepair, the second highest rate in the country. Some advocacy groups are voicing concerns that the state's infrastructure problems could worsen if a federal proposal to allow larger cargo trucks to hit the road is approved. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia’s film tax credit was eliminated by the West Virginia Legislature in 2018 after a legislative audit report deemed the credit as providing only “minimal economic impact.” But people who work in the film industry don’t agree. An attempt to resurrect the credit failed this past legislative session, but Liz McCormick reports supporters are hopeful it will make it through next year’s session.

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The National Weather Service says it will be surveying storm damage in West Virginia.

News outlets report a storm system passed through the Charleston area Monday evening knocking down trees and power lines and leaving more than 20,000 Appalachian Power customers without electric.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Despite tornado warnings and a brief recess in which lawmakers and the public were evacuated downstairs at the Capitol, the West Virginia Senate voted Monday to pass a controversial omnibus bill that could most notably lead to the state’s first charter schools. Senators fast-tracked the bill by suspending rules that would normally require they read the bill three times on three separate days. 

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The leader of West Virginia’s Republican party is applauding a state senator’s call for intolerance against members of the LGBTQ community.

Republican state Sen. Mike Azinger wrote an opinion article Sunday titled “The Shame of LGBTQ Pride” in The Parkersburg News and Sentinel after the paper covered a gay pride picnic. State GOP chairwoman Melody Potter then wrote on Facebook that Azinger’s article was “right on.”

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia’s Senate leader says he wants to pass a sweeping House GOP education bill that would allow the state’s first charter schools.

Republican Senate President Mitch Carmichael told The Associated Press on Thursday that he’s not going to try to amend the proposal when it gets to his chamber.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

President Trump says he called off a Thursday strike on Iran ordered as retaliation for Iran's having shot down a U.S. drone. Trump said he canceled the attack shortly before it was to begin, after he was told 150 people would very likely be killed.

"We were cocked & loaded to retaliate last night on 3 different sights when I asked, how many will die," Trump said in a series of tweets Friday.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the 2019 Veterans Affairs Mission Act went into effect earlier this month. It makes emergency and specialized care available to more U.S. veterans. The act promises to provide less red tape and greater satisfaction and predictability for veterans. The legislation passed through Congress easily with broad bipartisan support and President Trump signed it into law.

Robert Wilkie, the Veterans Affairs Secretary since last July, took over the VA during significant turmoil. He spoke over the phone with Eric Douglas about changes to the VA and the challenges the organization still faces.

Updated at 9:04 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a 40-foot World War I memorial cross can stay on public land at a Maryland intersection.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

Hours after Iran announced that it had shot down a U.S. drone, President Trump told journalists at the White House, "You'll soon find out" if the U.S. is planning a strike on Iran in retaliation.

"They're going to find out they made a very big mistake," Trump added, in comments that came as he met with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

But Trump also said he suspects that Iran's taking out the drone was not intentional, saying he finds it hard to believe.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Wednesday, Jun 19, 2019 at 11:40 p.m. 

The West Virginia House of Delegates has passed its version of a long, sweeping and controversial education reform measure. The bill, which is the latest in a series of omnibus proposals, cleared the lower chamber Wednesday on a 51-47 vote after delegates considered amendments on third reading.

Catherine Jozwik, president of the Eastern Panhandle Green Coalition, speaks at a press conference outside the attorney general's office on Wednesday, June 19, before several residents and concerned West Virginians handed the governor's office a petition
Emily Allen / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Residents from Jefferson County gathered at the West Virginia Capitol Wednesday to give Gov. Jim Justice a petition regarding a stone wool insulation plant they’ve spent the last year protesting.

Bluefield State College
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

Eligible West Virginia students could receive free tuition at Bluefield State College this fall.

News outlets report the college announced Tuesday that over a dozen programs classified as "high-skilled, high-demand" would begin offering free tuition.

Josh Hernandez / Creative Commons

Japanese truck maker Hino Motors Manufacturing is set to open its new West Virginia assembly plant this summer.

Hino Motors has scheduled an Aug. 21 grand opening for the facility in Mineral Wells. The company is moving about 20 miles to a larger location at a former retail distribution center.

The Capitol building in Charleston, West Virginia.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A legislative audit has found that the Jobs Act enacted by West Virginia lawmakers in 2001 in hopes of assuring that 75 percent of jobs on state-funded public works projects would go to local workers has failed.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports the audit says the legislation has been wholly ineffective and recommends that it be repealed.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia House of Delegates has advanced its own omnibus education bill and is getting set for a vote on the complex and controversial measure. The measure moved forward during a Tuesday floor session in which teachers lined the galleries to watch the proceedings.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

On the day of his self-declared presidential campaign kickoff, President Trump is threatening to deport "millions" of immigrants in the United States illegally beginning "next week."

But what's known is far less definitive.

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