Government

A sweeping tax proposal calls for the elimination of manufacturing machinery, equipment and inventory taxes on motor vehicles and other personal property. It also calls for hikes to tobacco and consumer sales taxes. The legislation has passed in the Senate, but a joint resolution that would make the bill constitutional was held over in that chamber for one day.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a historian of public schooling in the U.S. turned education advocate visited the state over the weekend. She joined in an event celebrating the teachers strike of 2018.

We recap this week’s legislative action with statehouse reporters, and we take a special look at bills seeking to bar discrimination against people based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Photo

Members of the West Virginia Senate have voted to provide free feminine hygiene products to inmates of the state’s prisons and jails. 

Senate Bill 484 would have the superintendent of a state correctional facility to provide inmates their choice of tampons or sanitary napkins within eight hours of a request.

We explore a major broadband bill that passed the House of Delegates, and we have a discussion with two West Virginia lawmakers who are involved in broadband and technology expansion in the state.

Mark Thiessen / AP Photo

A West Virginia city has voted to change its ordinance for marijuana possession.

Morgantown City County members voted unanimously Tuesday to modify the city’s law on possession of up to 15 grams of the drug, news outlets reported.

We bring you updates on the energy and environment legislation we've been following, and we also meet some students who visited the Capitol to participate in the page program for their local lawmakers.

Greyhound dogs sprint around a turn during a race at the Palm Beach Kennel Club, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Oct. 4, 2018.
Brynn Anderson / AP Photo

The West Virginia Senate has rejected a measure that would have eliminated a fund that helps prop up the state’s greyhound racing industry.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, an update on the state’s medical cannabis law. We also hear the latest news from the state Capitol, and we hear a report from StateImpact Pennsylvania on landfill pollution.

Medical Marijuana
John Locher / AP Photo

Lawmakers took a major step in 2017 toward legalizing cannabis use in West Virginia when they passed a bill that created a medical program. But nearly three years later, the program still isn’t operational — and many say it’s still more than a year away from launching. 

This session, lawmakers continue to offer some major tweaks to the as-of-yet-launched program. Those proposals – which are included in multiple bills – could change which forms would be considered medically acceptable.

We bring you a special report on the state's Medical Cannabis program and a bill this session to expand it to further accommodate patients. We'll also bring you an update on other major health bills from members of the House Health and Human Resources Committee.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we visit Clay County where educators are revamping the idea of home economics class to inspire resilience in student populations. We also bring you a conversation about radioactive natural gas drilling waste.

There were events all day at the Capitol celebrating the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment – guaranteeing women the right to vote. We hear about West Virginia’s suffragists and the need for West Virginia women to engage more actively in the political process.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate’s Finance Committee unveiled Monday a complicated and sweeping set of tax reforms. The proposed refiguration of the state’s tax code is somewhat of a game of musical chairs — with a few significant hurdles to overcome. 

Lawmakers in the GOP-led Senate are continuing their push to roll back the manufacturing machinery, equipment and inventory tax  but, with a committee originating bill, they’re also tacking on a proposal that would eliminate taxes on retail inventory and automobiles. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, there’s more and more conversation about what a transition away from a coal-heavy economy might look like in the state. But for many, it’s a hard reality to swallow.

Wwkayaker22 / en.wikipedia.org

Officials have released the identity of a kayaker who went missing along the banks of the Middle Fork River in West Virginia last Sunday. Officials with the state Department of Military Affairs and Public Safety say Jamie L. Gray, 41, of Hacker Valley is presumed drowned after going missing on Feb. 9. The agency is closing access to the Middle Fork River between Audra State Park in Barbour County and Tygart Valley River to bring in equipment to assist with the recovery of Gray. Officials say Gray was kayaking with a group of nine fellow paddlers in river last week.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice on Friday offered a conditional apology for calling a high school girls basketball team “thugs,” saying he didn’t know the remarks would cause any trouble.

We’ve passed the deadline for bills to be introduced in the House of Delegates this session. On Monday, that same cut-off will be in the Senate. Host Suzanne Higgins sits down with statehouse reporters Ryan Quinn of The Charleston Gazette-Mail, Taylor Stuck of the Huntington Herald-Dispatch, and Brad McElhinny of WV MetroNews for this week’s roundtable.

We look at two bills aimed at protecting health insurance coverage for pre-existing conditions – one offered by West Virginia Senate Republicans, and one offered by Senate Democrats.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020 at 4:05 p.m.

A mobile voting application used in West Virginia’s 2018 election cycle is susceptible to various vulnerabilities, according to a study released Thursday by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. But the company behind the technology is disputing the findings and recommendations of the study.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we visit Paden City where citizens are concerned that years of poorly reported water contamination has led to clusters of disease and health hardships.

We explore support and opposition to a bill that would cut funding for greyhound racing at two West Virginia tracks, and we bring you the latest in West Virginia Legislative news.

In this Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016 photo, West Virginia Gov. -elect Jim Justice talks to his team during halftime of a girls high school basketball game in Lewisburg, W.Va.
Steve Helber / AP Photo

Updated Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020 at 4:15 p.m.

Gov. Jim Justice is defending his use of the word “thugs” to describe players and coaches of a high school girls basketball team. The governor — who coaches the girls team at Greenbrier East High School — used the phrase to describe the behavior of an opposing team and their coaches during a Tuesday night game. With lawmakers in session, Justice’s words were also the topic of conversation Wednesday on the House of Delegates floor.

West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia educators would have to teach students about suicide prevention under a bill passed Wednesday by the state Senate.

Lawmakers voted 33-0 to approve the bill, which would require that teachers, students and other school officials get training on suicide prevention and awareness.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia has long been known for its apple production. But apple farmers are struggling and orchards are disappearing.

Roxy Todd/ WVPB

When you think of some of West Virginia’s biggest economic drivers, extractive industries like coal or natural gas are likely the first things that often come to mind. But agriculture has been a fixture in West Virginia’s economy for hundreds of years. Yet today, farmers struggle to keep their business afloat. Take apple farming, for example. West Virginia has been producing apples since the late 1800s, even exporting them out of state. Now, as the cider industry expands, there’s an increasing demand for local apples. And some people think this is one economic development opportunity the state is overlooking. 


We bring you a special report and discussion on the challenges faced by West Virginia’s farmers. We also bring you the latest news from the Capitol.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate passed a bill Tuesday that would allow private and homeschool students to play public school sports and participate in other extracurricular activities. Senate Bill 131, known as the Tim Tebow Act, is named after the Heisman trophy winner and professional athlete who fought as a homeschooler for the right to play public school sports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, hemp farmers in the region are coming up short – really short – on the return on their investment into the fledgling industry.

We learn about a state program that’s helping thousands of West Virginia grandparents who are raising their grandchildren, and we have a conversation with the co-chairs of a new bipartisan Tech Caucus.

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