Gov. Jim Justice

Gov. Jim Justice giving his 2018 State of the State address.
Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

Lawyers for the West Virginia governor have been ordered to explain motions filed in a lawsuit about the governor's residency.

Greenbier
Bobak Ha'Eri / Wikimedia Commons

The Greenbrier resort has announced it's giving away prizes and tickets to an upcoming golf tournament. A coal company controlled by the family of West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice is paying for the tickets.  

Gov. Jim Justice holds a bill signing ceremony for House Bill 207 in Pleasants County on July 30, 2019.
Office of Gov. Jim Justice

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice has approved a tax break for a struggling coal-fired power plant whose operator says a company owned by the governor owes it $3.1 million.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice gives a speech during a Department of Tourism conference Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, at the Morgantown Event Center.
Jesse Wright / WVPB

A judge has ordered lawyers for the governor of West Virginia to respond to a request for documents in an ongoing lawsuit over his residency.

Judge Charles King rejected a dismissal motion Wednesday by Gov. Jim Justice's attorneys. King also ordered Justice to respond to Democratic Del. Isaac Sponaugle's discovery request within 30 days.

Roads, Road, Highway, Turnpike
Seicer / Wikimedia Commons

The West Virginia Parkways Authority announced that State Farm is sponsoring the Courtesy Patrol program along the 88-mile stretch from Charleston to Princeton.

Susan Walsh / AP Photo

President Donald Trump has tweeted support for West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice as state lawmakers wrangle over education policy.

Gov. Jim Justice giving his 2018 State of the State address.
Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

A company owned by West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice's family has avoided a tax sale by paying more than $400,000 to cover back taxes.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Coal companies tied to West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice are promising to pay huge property tax debts owed to some eastern Kentucky counties.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A top Republican in the West Virginia Senate is calling on Gov  Jim Justice to resign.

Sen. Craig Blair, R-Berkeley, took aim at Gov. Justice first in a paid-for column in a weekend edition of The Martinsburg Journal and then with other news media on Monday.  

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A long-running lawsuit seeking to require West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice to live in the state's capital will continue.

A circuit judge in Charleston on Wednesday asked for more legal filings in the case brought by Democratic Del. Isaac Sponaugle.

Sponaugle says Justice should be ordered to live in Charleston because the state constitution requires the governor to "reside at the seat of government." He argued that the citizens of West Virginia deserve a governor who is on the job.

Gov. Justice takes the oath of office as his son James C. Justice III (center) looks on.
Office of the West Virginia Governor

In apparent anticipation of a federal lawsuit seeking recovery of overdue penalties, coal companies owned by the family of West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice have filed a lawsuit of their own against federal surface mining regulators.

 

 

The suit, first reported by WV MetroNews, is an apparent preemptive strike against the federal government, which is preparing to sue the companies over over unpaid fines associated with more than 100 environmental and reclamation violations at mines in West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

He's a billionaire who owns mines, farms and the swankiest resort in all of West Virginia. But how Jim Justice spends his time as the state's 36th governor has largely been a mystery.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a civil lawsuit against 23 coal companies owned by the family of West Virginia Governor Jim Justice. As Brittany Patterson reports, the DOJ is seeking over $4.7 million in unpaid fines and fees for mine health and safety violations.

Gov. Jim Justice, R. W.Va., delivers his annual State of the State speech on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019, in Charleston, W.Va.
Tyler Evert / Associated Press

Updated May 8, 2019 at 2:45 p.m. 

 

The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a civil lawsuit against 23 coal companies owned by the family of West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice, seeking more than $4.7 million in unpaid fines and fees for mine safety and health violations.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice talks about his budget proposal during a stop on his Save Our State Tour on Thursday, March 3, 2017, at Fairmont State University.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A federal investigation of West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice has widened to include a range of tax documents on the governor's expansive business portfolio, according to a subpoena sent to his administration last month.

An exterior view of prescription drug distributor McKesson Corp. headquarters in San Francisco, in this May 3, 2006 file photo.
Paul Sakuma / AP Photo

West Virginia has reached a $37 million settlement with the drug distributor McKesson in a lawsuit accusing the company of shipping millions of suspicious orders for painkillers to the state as it was being ravaged by the opioid epidemic.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This is a developing story and may be updated.

 

A federal grand jury has issued a subpoena to the West Virginia Department of Commerce related to the sponsorship of a PGA golf tournament held at The Greenbrier and a non-profit offshoot of the resort. The subpoena called on the state commerce department to hand over records to the U.S. Department of Justice last week.

Gov. Jim Justice -- whose family's companies own The Greenbrier, a golf tournament that takes place there and other entities -- is named in the subpoena, along with his children and others involved in the family's businesses and organizations.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Hours ahead of a midnight deadline to take action on bills from the regular legislative session, Gov. Jim Justice has announced a final set of approvals and vetoes.

Of the 294 bills passed this regular session, Justice signed 266 pieces of legislation and vetoed 28.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Updated Tuesday, March 26, 2019 at 4:50 p.m.

 

With a deadline looming for West Virginia’s executive branch to take action on bills passed this legislative session, staff of the governor’s office is making their way through hundreds of measures. By Tuesday afternoon, Gov. Jim Justice had signed some notable pieces of legislation but also had left the fate of other bills unknown.

 

According to the Legislature’s website, Justice signed more than 45 bills on Monday. That’s in addition to dozens of measures signed during and after the legislative session, which ended March 9.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Gov. Jim Justice has announced a plan to address deteriorating secondary roads in West Virginia.

Justice said it is unknown how much it will cost to address issues with secondary roads. However, he said he plans to hire hundreds of temporary highway workers, many of whom he hopes will become permanent. Additionally, the plan includes purchasing maintenance equipment.  

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice has selected a registered lobbyist working on behalf of the governor’s family companies to fill a vacancy left by the resignation of a state senator.

Paul Hardesty of Logan County will replace former Sen. Richard Ojeda in the state Senate’s 7th District, which covers Boone, Lincoln, Logan and parts of Mingo and Wayne counties.

Fact-Checking Jim Justice's State of the State Address

Jan 9, 2019
Gov. Jim Justice, R. W.Va., delivers his annual State of the State speech on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019, in Charleston, W.Va.
Tyler Evert / Associated Press

Gov. Jim Justice delivered his third State of the State address tonight, proposing the elimination of a state tax on Social Security benefits, a 5 percent pay raise for state employees including teachers, and millions of dollars more for substance abuse and other social services.

John Raby / AP Photo

With the 2020 election still a little less than two years away, Republican Gov. Jim Justice has announced he is running for re-election. The announcement, which came at a Monday event in White Sulphur Springs, was promoted by the state Republican Party through an email invitation to media and other interested parties.

Office of the WV Governor, via Flickr

A federal judge today ruled that a coal company controlled by Gov. Jim Justice’s family must turn over financial information and make its employees available for questioning.

WV State Police Cruiser
WCHS-TV

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Two West Virginia state troopers have been suspended without pay pending an investigation into an incident in which a 16-year-old Martinsburg white male was beaten.

 

West Virginia State Police say the suspect was involved in a Monday, Nov. 19 crash with a sheriff's department cruiser and then crashed again following a pursuit. The suspect was apprehended, transported to a hospital and then later released.

Enrichyourmind / wikimedia Commons

The West Virginia Supreme Court has rejected a lawmaker's effort to force Gov. Jim Justice to live in Charleston.

The court earlier this month voted 4-0 to toss a challenge from Pendleton County Democratic Delegate Isaac Sponaugle.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Gov. Jim Justice says he isn’t planning to call the Legislature back into session to address pending impeachment trials after a temporary bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court halted the trial of the state’s chief justice.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice / via Twitter

A Democratic West Virginia lawmaker has refiled a legal challenge of Republican Gov. Jim Justice's residency.

News outlets report Delegate Isaac Sponaugle of Pendleton filed a petition Tuesday for writ of mandamus against Justice, asking the court to require the governor to live at the seat of government, as the West Virginia Constitution and state code require.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

A candidate for the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals has filed suit to remove another candidate from the ballot and seeks to prohibit the recent temporary appointments of two justices to the bench of the state’s high court.

Charleston attorney William Schwartz has filed a writ of mandamus and a writ of prohibition with the West Virginia Supreme Court to have Congressman Evan Jenkins' name removed from the November ballot in his bid for a seat on the bench and stop his appointment. The filing also argues that former House Speaker Tim Armstead’s appointment is unconstitutional.

Gov. Jim Justice during the State of the State Address in January 2018.
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A West Virginia judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by a Democratic state delegate against Republican Gov. Jim Justice demanding that he live in the county where West Virginia’s capital city is located.

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