Eminent Domain

In this Thursday, May 3, 2018 photo, downed trees mark the route of the proposed Mountain Valley pipeline in Lindside, W.Va.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

Authorities have arrested a protester who strapped himself to construction equipment at a Mountain Valley Pipeline site in West Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, it’s time to gather round the table with family, eat turkey, and talk. America’s political divisions seem to amplify during the holidays, as families across the country gather and either talk politics politely -- or avoid it altogether. In today’s episode of West Virginia Morning, we bring you another installment of “Red State Blue State.”

Pipe ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A group of landowners along the path of the Mountain Valley Pipeline in Virginia and West Virginia is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to hear an appeal in their eminent domain lawsuit against federal regulators and developers.

The plaintiffs filed a petition this week asking the high court to reverse a decision by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. That court over the summer affirmed the ruling of a lower-court judge who didn't rule on the case's constitutional issues but dismissed them, saying she lacked jurisdiction.

On The Legislature Today, details about an estimated $84 billion investment by a Chinese energy company have been slim since Governor Jim Justice and Commerce Secretary Woody Thrasher made the announcement last fall. In this episode, we'll talk to a lead scientist at West Virginia University who describes a long-time relationship between the university and this energy company.

Pipe ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A federal judge tells developers of the Mountain Valley Pipeline he won't order all landowners in its West Virginia lawsuit to respond by Dec. 4 to motions for summary judgment for rights of way available under federal regulations.

Eastern Panhandle Gas Pipeline, Mountaineer Gas, Protest, Pipeline
Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting


All summer long, pipeline protesters have been camped along the Potomac River in Maryland and West Virginia. They don’t want to see a 3.5 mile long TransCanada natural gas pipeline built underneath the river. Supporters argue the line is critical to expanding natural gas resources to businesses and homes in the growing Eastern Panhandle. 

 

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Mountain Valley Pipeline LLC sent out letters threatening legal action against property owners who refused access to their land for surveying. Groups opposed to the pipeline believe there is no basis for legal action. The issue appears far from black and white.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline, or MVP, is a proposed 42-inch diameter, 330-mile line that would connect hydraulic fracturing operations in West Virginia to a transmission pipeline in Virginia. EQT and NextEra Energy are partnering on the project.