Education

CREDIT COURTESY OF WV STATE ARCHIVES (WVSA), COAL LIFE COLLECTION

After a nine-day statewide strike, West Virginia teachers and school service employees are back to work with a hard-won commitment from lawmakers of a 5 percent pay raise for all public workers. Gov. Jim Justice also ordered the creation of a task force to explore long-term solutions to the public employees insurance program known as PEIA.

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Wyoming County was one of the first school systems to decide to walk off the job during the recent statewide teacher strike, essentially starting what some are calling a labor movement. West Virginia Education Assocation President Dale Lee says Wyoming along with Logan, Mingo and McDowell made the first move.

For about two weeks, teachers from across the state held signs and led chants inside the Capitol. Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly caught up with one of those teachers, Nina Tunstalle, on her way up to Charleston.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

After nine long days of a teacher and service personnel work stoppage, it looks as if it’s come to an end. Lawmakers agreed Tuesday to a five percent pay raise for teachers as well as a five percent pay increase for all public workers. Following the signing, union leaders say they are readying teachers and other school workers to get back on the job. 


Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) announced Tuesday it is extending the application deadline for Fall 2018 PROMISE scholarships to Friday, March 30, 2018.

Some students reported they had difficulty completing their PROMISE applications by the earlier deadline due to the statewide public school work stoppage, and legislators and the governor asked the Commission to provide relief, said HEPC Chancellor Dr. Paul L. Hill.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Still no deal at West Virginia's state Capitol over public schoolteachers' pay and benefits, and what that means is no end in sight to a teachers strike that began on February 22.

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Copyright 2019 West Virginia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

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West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Gov. Jim Justice revised his revenue estimates for next year, which allows for a 5 percent pay raise for teachers and state service personnel. But schools remain closed Thursday, with thousands of state employees still concerned about ballooning insurance rates. On last night’s episode of The Legislature Today, host Andrea Lannom spoke with Senate Finance Chairman Craig Blair about these issues. We have an excerpt from that interview.

Mixed Response To Plan To End West Virginia Teacher Strike

Feb 28, 2018
Teachers John and Kerry Guerini of Fayetteville, West Virginia, hold signs at a rally at the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va., Monday, Feb. 26, 2018.
John Raby / Associated Press

This story is developing and will be updated.

Gov. Jim Justice’s proposed 5 percent pay raise to end the walkout by West Virginia teachers quickly received a mixed reception in the Legislature where approval is needed.

Justice’s Tuesday evening announcement followed his meeting with union leaders for teachers in all 55 counties. They planned to return to work Thursday after striking a week earlier over low pay and rising health insurance costs.

Gideon and the Governor

Feb 28, 2018
Ann Coleman, principal at Triadelphia Middle School, and Ohio County Schools Superintendent Dr. Kim Miller, met with Gideon and his parents following Gov. Justice’s press conference.
Gabe Wells, Ohio County Schools

This article was originally published by Weelunk.

“If you put money in schools, you’re making smart people. And if you have smart people then you can make more smart investments.”

That’s what Gideon Titus-Glover said to Gov. Jim Justice during a town hall meeting at Wheeling Park High School on Monday. It left the state’s CEO speechless.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, after meetings Tuesday with Gov. Jim Justice, leaders of teacher and service personnel unions say the work stoppage will end Thursday. Dave Mistich reports on how the news was delivered and reaction from lawmakers.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In this episode of West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear from union leaders and also from students who are finding ways to speak up about the teachers’ strike. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we have the latest from the Capitol on the ongoing teacher walk-out and protest at in Charleston. With the continued approach of county school officials remaining in question, the potential of legal action to be decided by the state board of education and legislative deadlines looming, educators and school workers yet again plan to head to the Capitol in Charleston to rally lawmakers for better pay and health care benefits.

On The Legislature Today, teachers, school service personnel and other public employees returned for the second of a two-day work stoppage as frustrations linger over salaries and healthcare. Leaders of the American Federation of Teachers, West Virginia and the West Virginia Education Association announced Friday that the work stoppage will continue Monday. But will it be just that -- a work stoppage -- or a full-on strike? Here’s the latest from the statehouse in this week’s reporter roundtable.

Gloria Triplett, a reading specialist at East Chapmanville Elementary School, holds signs Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, during a teacher rally at the West Virginia Capitol in Charleston, W.Va.
John Raby / Associated Press

West Virginia teachers will continue their strike into next week, the latest response to what’s quickly becoming a deepening rift with the governor and Legislature over pay and health benefits.

Thousands of teachers and school service workers in all 55 counties will remain off the job Monday, union leaders announced at a news conference Friday afternoon.

Acts of violence and protests resisting racial integration were features in many American communities in the 1950s and 60s. A tiny town in the coalfields of South Central West Virginia appears to have been a notable exception.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, all 55 West Virginia county school systems were closed yesterday and continue to be closed today, because of a two-day work stoppage over teacher salaries and Public Employee Insurance Agency costs. Reporter Dave Mistich breaks all the issues down for us.

West Virginia's public schools were closed Thursday, as teachers across the state walked out and protested for better pay and benefits from state lawmakers.

Gov. Jim Justice signed a bill Wednesday to give teachers a 2 percent pay raise starting in July, and an additional 1 percent pay increase in 2020 and 2021.

Kristian Thacker

The West Virginia House of Delegates has approved a plan to use part of yearly budget surpluses to help fund public employee health insurance.

The bill comes as thousands of teachers, school service personnel and other public employees took to the Capitol Thursday, Feb. 22, to rally lawmakers for better pay and an overhaul of their insurance plan. Schools in all 55 of West Virginia’s counties were closed Thursday because of the work stoppage. A second day of walkouts is planned for Friday.

Nicole Erwin

In the wake of school shootings in Kentucky and Florida, a rash of copycat school threats throughout the Ohio Valley left law enforcement and school officials grappling with how to improve security. A school counseling expert says it’s useful to look at the potential school shootings that did not happen. His research focuses on how schools have successfully averted shooting incidents.

Culture of Dignity

On The Legislature Today, the looming statewide teacher work stoppage is scheduled for later this week, and there are several related issues before the Finance and Education Committees. Host Andrea Lannom chats with Del. Paul Espinosa, R-Jefferson, Chairman of the House Education Committee and member of the House Finance committee. Also joining the conversation is Del. Larry Rowe, D-Kanawha, member of both the House Education and Finance Committees.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On today's West Virginia Morning, a statewide walkout has been announced for teachers and other state employees for Thursday and Friday this week. As Liz McCormick reports, the announcement was made during Saturday's rally at the state Capitol, in Charleston.

Concord University's Marsh Hall Bell Tower.
Christopher Ziemnowicz / CZmarlin / wikimedia Commons

A recent report ranks one university in West Virginia among the top 50 public colleges where undergrads receive the most scholarship aid.

According to a study released by The Student Loan Report, a limited liability private company, Concord is ranked 49th out of 250 public college of universities.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, The West Virginia House of Delegates passed a salary increase for teachers, school service personnel and state troopers Tuesday. The passage of the bill comes as two of the state’s teacher unions have threatened to strike amid growing frustrations over salaries, problems with the state’s insurance provider and teacher vacancies. Dave Mistich has the story.

On The Legislature Today, hundreds of teachers rallied at the Capitol. Teachers from selected counties staged walk-in's and walk-outs, and Governor Jim Justice cancelled a scheduled press conference where it was planned he would talk about education issues. Host Andrea Lannom chats with fellow statehouse reporters Brad McElhinny of West Virginia MetroNews and Ryan Quinn of the Charleston Gazette-Mail in another reporter roundtable.

Gloria Triplett, a reading specialist at East Chapmanville Elementary School, holds signs Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, during a teacher rally at the West Virginia Capitol in Charleston, W.Va.
John Raby / Associated Press

Before a gallery packed with teachers, West Virginia's Senate approved a bill Friday to give them annual pay raises of 1 percent over a four-year period, a move that both teachers and many senators said wasn't enough.

The bill passed on a 33-0 vote after a lengthy discussion. One senator was absent.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, during the course of the past week, teacher rallies have sprung up around the state, as the West Virginia Education Association and the American Federation for Teachers continue discussions with members about possible strikes or walkouts.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Over the course of the week, teacher rallies have sprung up around the state, as the West Virginia Education Association and the state chapter of the American Federation for Teachers continue discussions with members about possible strikes or walkouts. While increases to PEIA premiums and deductibles are some elements feeding those talks, teacher pay has been another flash point.

In Wake Of School Shooting, A Look At How Kids Get Guns

Jan 25, 2018
Heather Adams and Gloria Hollifield waiting to pick up their children after the shooting.  There is another parallel to the Marshall County High shooting.
Nicole Erwin / Ohio Valley ReSource

Heather Adams sat in a line of cars along Kentucky Route 95, cars filled with parents who had just received the call no parent wants to get: A shooting at her child’s school, Marshall County High in Benton, Kentucky. Two 15-year-old students were killed and another 18 injured.  


On The Legislature Today, education bills are making their way through committees. Host Andrea Lannom asks House Education Chairman Del. Paul Espinosa to outline some of that legislation as well as touch on issues that might come up at the statehouse this year.

Electron / Wikimedia Commons

The West Virginia Board of Education has agreed to reduce the credits required to graduate from the state's high schools from 24 to 22, allowing two fewer elective classes.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that change will apply in the next school year.

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