Education

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, when President Trump delivers his State of the Union address on Tuesday he’ll talk about job growth and it’s quite likely he’ll talk about coal. The coal industry and its out-of-work miners have been important symbols for Trump. 

But as Brittany Patterson reports, after two years under Trump more coal power plants are closing down and coal employment is at an all-time low.

In this reporter roundtable, we recap the week’s proceedings over Senate Bill 451 – a massive bill to reform public education in West Virginia. We bring you up-to-date on where the bill is now and where it’s heading.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On last night’s episode of The Legislature Today, WVPB assistant news director Glynis Board spoke with Felicia Bush. Bush is a founder and CEO of the nonprofit Harmony Mental Health and co-founding member of Handle with Care. She works to implement trauma-informed care across six counties in the state – helping educators respond to students traumatized by the opioid crisis. On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an excerpt from the interview.

Sen. Craig Blair presides over the Senate's Committee of the Whole on Jan. 30, 2019, to discuss SB 451, sweeping and controversial education reform bill.
Will Price / WV Legislative Photography

The full West Virginia Senate is set to consider amendments to a wide-ranging and controversial education reform bill Friday.

Senate Bill 451, also known as the omnibus education bill, cleared the chamber’s 34-member Committee of the Whole on an 18-16 roll call vote and advanced to the Senate proper. Republican Sens. Kenny Mann and Bill Hamilton joined Democrats as no votes.

It’s been a marathon day in the West Virginia Senate, as senators discuss SB 451 – the comprehensive education reform bill – as a “committee as a whole.” In the House, delegates considered amendments to HB 2010 – transitioning the state’s foster care system to a managed care model.

Appalachia Health News Reporter Kara Lofton leads a discussion on the Justice administration’s plan to tackle the state's substance abuse crisis, and host Suzanne Higgins chats with Senior Statehouse Reporter Dave Mistich about the comprehensive education reform bill, which continues to garner attention throughout the state and under the dome.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a controversial piece of legislation focused on overhauling public education continues to move through the West Virginia Senate. Lawmakers adopted a motion yesterday to skip the bill’s second reference to the Senate Finance Committee and instead bring the bill before the full Senate as the Committee of the Whole. Dave Mistich has more.

The omnibus education reform bill is the talk of the Capitol’s halls. A historic move was made by Senate leadership Monday to have the bill, SB 451, reported to the floor and be considered by “the committee as a whole” – meaning all 34 senators would consider the bill from the floor in the same manner as if it were still in committee.

Senate
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

This is a developing story and will be updated.

 

A controversial piece of legislation focused on overhauling public education continues to move quickly through the West Virginia Senate. Lawmakers adopted a motion Monday, Jan. 28, to skip the bill’s second reference to the Senate Finance Committee and instead bring the bill before the full Senate as the Committee of the Whole.

We bring you another Friday Reporter Roundtable. Host Suzanne Higgins is joined by statehouse reporters to recap the week and look ahead to the next. We explore the massive education reform bill, the debate over legalizing cannabis in West Virginia, child welfare needs, and the latest on legislation related to an Intermediate Court of Appeals.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, after weeks of speculation about the contents of an education reform bill, lawmakers in the West Virginia Senate are now releasing details of the legislation. Widely known as an “omnibus” bill, the legislation is set to offer pay raises and address health care, but also offer additional components leaders of teacher and service personnel unions oppose. Dave Mistich has more.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

After weeks of speculation over the contents of an education reform bill, lawmakers in the West Virginia Senate are now releasing details of the legislation. Widely known as an “omnibus” bill, the legislation is set to offer pay raises and address healthcare, but also offer additional components opposed by leaders of teacher and service personnel unions.

A huge education reform bill was revealed in the Senate Education Committee. We bring you up-to-date on the bill’s latest action, and we also take a closer look at broadband expansion legislation moving through the statehouse.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

President of the West Virginia Board of Education David Perry joined Suzanne Higgins host The Legislature Today last night to discuss some of the biggest education issues, concerns and ideas for this legislative session, including an omnibus education bill expected to be taken up this week in Senate Education. 

President of the West Virginia Board of Education David Perry joins host Suzanne Higgins to weigh in on multiple proposals this session, including their own to the school aid funding formula. We'll also have our Social Media Monday segment and the latest from the Capitol with Senior Statehouse Reporter Dave Mistich.

 

Unions representing public educators and school service personnel are trying to stave off a bill that hasn’t even been introduced yet. What some are calling an omnibus education bill would boost teacher salaries and benefits, but could also reform education in ways the unions oppose.

It’s Friday, which means we're joined by veteran statehouse reporters to discuss the latest action from the West Virginia Legislature. Host Suzanne Higgins is joined by Jake Zuckerman and Ryan Quinn of the Charleston Gazette-Mail and Brad McElhinny of WV MetroNews.

Senate Finance Chair Craig Blair and House Finance Minority Chair Mick Bates join Senior Statehouse Reporter Dave Mistich to talk budget issues. We also bring you coverage from the West Virginia Department of Education’s budget hearing in House Finance and the latest on the community and technical college tuition assistance bill, SB 1.

Senate Education Chair Patricia Rucker, R-Jefferson. Jan. 15, 2019.
Will Price / WV Legislative Photography

Senators in the Senate Education Committee Tuesday unanimously approved Senate Bill 1 -- “Increasing access to career education and workforce training.”

Wikimedia Commons

West Virginia's public high school four-year graduation rate last school year was 90 percent, up from 89 percent the previous school year.

Jada Reeves (center) as she was recognized by Gov. Jim Justice during his 2019 State of the State Address.
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A fifth-grade teacher has been named West Virginia's Teacher of the Year for 2019.

The state Education Department said in a news release that Jada Reeves of Bradley Elementary in Mount Hope was presented the award on Thursday. It includes more than $15,000 and the use of a new car.

Teachers on strike in the rotunda of the West Virginia Capitol.
Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Teachers in at least 30 counties across West Virginia participated in a walk-in demonstration Wednesday morning, and teachers in all 55 counties wore red to show solidarity.


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The West Virginia Autism Training Center based at Marshall University has expanded its programs to Shepherd.

Shepherd joins Concord University as the second campus-based satellite site for Marshall’s autism services program.

Elementary Classroom
Douglaspperkins / Wikimedia Commons

The West Virginia School Building Authority has voted to fund more than $72 million in facilities projects statewide.

Monday's vote includes construction and renovation projects for public school systems in 19 counties.

BridgeValley Community and Technical College is one of nine CTCs in West Virginia.
Daniel Walker / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A bill West Virginia Public Broadcasting followed closely during the 2018 regular state Legislative session could resurface in 2019 – legislation that would offer tuition assistance to in-state students attending a Community and Technical College. Last year, it was often referred to as the "free community and technical college bill," and it would’ve provided the “last dollar in” after all other forms of financial aid had been exhausted.

West Virginia House Majority Leader Daryl Cowles, R-Morgan, studies legislation in a House Finance Committee meeting in 2017.
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia lawmakers in the Eastern Panhandle have a long list of issues they hope to tackle in the upcoming state Legislative session, including reintroducing a controversial bill to allow eligible people to carry guns on college campuses.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a bill we followed closely during the 2018 legislative session could resurface in the 2019 session – legislation that would offer tuition assistance to in-state students attending a community and technical college. It was often referred to as the free community and technical college bill, and it would’ve provided the “last dollar in” after all other forms of financial aid had been exhausted.

The Great Textbook War

Nov 21, 2018

In 1974, a fierce controversy erupted over some newly adopted school textbooks in Kanawha County, West Virginia. School buildings were hit by dynamite and Molotov cocktails, buses were riddled with bullets, journalists were beaten and surrounding coal mines were shut down by protesting miners. Textbook supporters thought they would introduce students to new ideas about literature and multi-culturalism. Opponents felt the books undermined traditional American values.

 

Students at Computers
Flickr upload bot / wikimedia commons

Thousands of unused items like computers, monitors, keyboards and mice are being donated to the West Virginia Education Department for use in schools across the state.

courtesy Marshall University

Marshall University has announced a $25 million gift to the Lewis College of Business from Intuit Chairman and CEO Brad D. Smith and his wife.


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