Education

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Christine Nichols is a speech pathologist at Winfield Elementary School in Putnam County. In this audio postcard she talks about the challenges of trying to do speech therapy remotely with young kids who may not have access to the internet – even if they have caregivers who can help them. 


On this West Virginia Morning, keeping kids from falling through the cracks while schools are closed – we hear one speech pathologist’s experience. And we explore how to support artists in the time of COVID-19.

(left clockwise) Daisy, Evie, Claire and Xylon Mason play a board game together at their home in Charles Town, W.Va. Games have been a major key to learning for the Mason children who are all homeschooled.
Courtesy Amy Mason

 


Concerns over coronavirus have schools in West Virginia closed until at least April 30. And in Jefferson County, schools are closed for the rest of the academic year. As a result, thousands of kids throughout the state are staying home and attending school in new ways.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting explored some of the resources available to help West Virginia’s kids and their families succeed.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll discuss homeschooling challenges and resources, including questions some younger state residents might have.

Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For many parents across the state and globe (including yours truly and my 7-year-old son Brynn) the switch from in-class to at-home learning in the wake of Coronavirus school shutdowns was drastic and fast. I met up online with the head of my son's school, Elizabeth Hofreuter, for some extra insight into that transition. A graduate of Princeton University and Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Hofreuter has been leading Wheeling Country Day School, a private school in the Northern Panhandle, for 11 years.


Wikimedia Commons

In the face of social distancing requirements implemented to limit the spread of the coronavirus, colleges across the state are re-examining their commencement plans.

West Liberty University
West Liberty University

A college in the Northern Panhandle is postponing its search for its next president amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

West Liberty University has suspended its presidential selection process until early August in response to the coronavirus crisis, the college announced in a release on Monday.

Courtesy Berkeley County Schools

Schools across West Virginia closed Monday, March 16, for at least two weeks in an effort to help stem the transmission of the coronavirus. 

Since the shutdown was announced, West Virginians around the state have been working to make sure students are fed. According to the West Virginia Department of Education, more than two-thirds  of school-aged children, or more than 183,000, qualify for free or reduced-priced meals. 

Elementary Classroom
Douglaspperkins / Wikimedia Commons

Updated March 15, 2020 at 9:00 p.m.

 

Although no cases of the novel coronavirus have been found in West Virginia yet, Gov. Jim Justice announced Friday, March 13, all West Virginia schools are to close on Monday as a precaution. 

 

Host Suzanne Higgins speaks with Interim Chancellor of the Higher Education Policy Commission and Chancellor of the West Virginia Community and Technical College System, Dr. Sarah Armstrong Tucker for a discussion on higher education funding issues, secondary education attainment and financial aid requirement challenges.

West Virginia University

The president of West Virginia University released a letter Sunday emphasizing the university's commitment to safety after two recent shootings near the Morgantown campus, one of them involving a fatality.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, debates nationally and globally rage on about high-speed data coverage and which country will control it, while in West Virginia, many residents are still looking for any reliable connection at all. We hear how that affects schools and communities.

Courtesy photo

Diane Ravitch is an author and public education historian turned education activist. Recently, she was in Charleston speaking at the Red For Ed Celebration on the second anniversary of the West Virginia teacher’s strike. She spoke with Eric Douglas about the teacher’s movement and her book, “Slaying Goliath: The Passionate Resistance to Privatization and the Fight to Save America’s Public Schools.” The book details the massive private funding in the educational reform movement that began in the George W. Bush era and the teacher’s movements that have spread across the country in its wake. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a historian of public schooling in the U.S. turned education advocate visited the state over the weekend. She joined in an event celebrating the teachers strike of 2018.

W. Clayton Burch, Interim Secretary, West Virginia Department of Commerce.
WV Governor's Office

The West Virginia State Board of Education has selected someone to take over as state superintendent of schools. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we visit Clay County where educators are revamping the idea of home economics class to inspire resilience in student populations. We also bring you a conversation about radioactive natural gas drilling waste.

We’ve passed the deadline for bills to be introduced in the House of Delegates this session. On Monday, that same cut-off will be in the Senate. Host Suzanne Higgins sits down with statehouse reporters Ryan Quinn of The Charleston Gazette-Mail, Taylor Stuck of the Huntington Herald-Dispatch, and Brad McElhinny of WV MetroNews for this week’s roundtable.

West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia educators would have to teach students about suicide prevention under a bill passed Wednesday by the state Senate.

Lawmakers voted 33-0 to approve the bill, which would require that teachers, students and other school officials get training on suicide prevention and awareness.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia has long been known for its apple production. But apple farmers are struggling and orchards are disappearing.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Following an incident in Mineral County last year, a bill to create a Religious Liberties in Schools Act has passed the West Virginia House of Delegates in a 76 to 22 vote and will move on to the state Senate for consideration.  

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate passed a bill Tuesday that would allow private and homeschool students to play public school sports and participate in other extracurricular activities. Senate Bill 131, known as the Tim Tebow Act, is named after the Heisman trophy winner and professional athlete who fought as a homeschooler for the right to play public school sports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a newly expanded program aims to address student needs – needs that are often hidden from plain sight.

The West Virginia Department of Education and Marshall University unveiled a new initiative this week. It’s a framework a year in the making to address the wave of students flooding public schools who are coping with various forms of substance use disorders at home. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a new survey from APM Research Lab shows attitudes across the country toward immigrants shift depending on the makeup of our local communities.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate Education Committee has approved a bill that would allow homeschool and private school students to participate in public school extracurricular activities under the state’s Secondary School Activities Commission. 

The final moments of Friday afternoon are slipping away at Eastern High School in Lansing, Mich., as announcements echo through the halls.

As students stream through the doors, teacher Dee Halstead is rolling her supply cart to the library. Her workday is just ramping up.

"This is my classroom on wheels," Halstead said. "It's my laptop and all of the papers I need to give the students and my flash drive so I can print off this exam."

This week lawmakers debated tax breaks, sought remedies for a foster care system in crisis, passed a resolution calling for a convention of states and much more. Host Suzanne Higgins is joined by statehouse reporters to recap a week of legislative action.

W.Va. Schools Chief: Plan To Cut History Classes Should Be History

Jan 22, 2020
West Virginia Department of Education

West Virginia's public schools superintendent wants the state Board of Education not to reduce the number of social studies courses required for high school graduation.

Superintendent Steve Paine said in a statement Monday that he will make the recommendation based on an overwhelming response to the proposal.

Patricia Rucker
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A controversial proposal that failed in the GOP-led West Virginia Legislature’s education overhaul last year has been reintroduced in the state senate. 

Capitol, West Virginia State Capitol
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Department of Education shared a $2.59 billion budget proposal for 2021 with the House Finance Committee Monday morning. 

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