DuPont

Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Executives from three major chemical companies — DuPont de Nemours, Inc., The Chemours Company and The 3M Company — testified for the first time to Congress about widespread contamination from the group of nonstick, fluorinated chemicals broadly called PFAS.

The so-called “forever chemicals” persist in the environment, are linked to ill health effects, and have been found in numerous water systems in the Ohio Valley.

In this Dec. 9, 2015, file photo, the company name of Dupont appears above its trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
AP file photo

The DuPont Co. massively downplayed the cost of environmental liabilities with which Chemours would be saddled when DuPont spun off its former performance chemicals unit in 2015, according to a lawsuit unsealed Friday.

The maximum liability exposure figures that DuPont certified prior to the spinoff have proven to be “systematically and spectacularly wrong,” Chemours alleges.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / Courtesy of E. I du Pont de Nemours & Company, Belle

  On April 1, 1926, the DuPont plant at Belle produced North America’s first ammonia made from a high-pressure process. A few years before, chemical giant E. I. DuPont had decided to build an ammonia plant, using technology developed by Germany during World War I. The technology consisted of giant mechanical compressors, called ‘‘hypers,’’ which generated up to 15,000 pounds of pressure per square inch. In 1925, DuPont started construction of its new hyper-pressure plant in the eastern Kanawha County town of Belle.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said today the agency is prepared to take action to limit exposure of  widely-used toxic chemicals used to make non-stick items. 

PFAS is a category of man-made chemicals that includes PFOA, PFOS, C8, GenX, and many other chemicals with stain resistant, non-stick and waterproof properties. Several communities across the Ohio Valley have detected PFAS chemicals in drinking water and a few have significant contamination.

Wood County 911

A new lawsuit over the industrial fire that burned for a week in West Virginia targets the chemical manufacturer who sold products stored in the building.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Critics say DuPont has spent too little on testing Ohio and West Virginia residents for contamination from a chemical used to make Teflon, while paying millions to a lawyer overseeing the testing program.

The Columbus Dispatch reports DuPont spent about $860,000 on testing over a 2 ½-year period for contamination from the chemical used to make Teflon at its Washington Works plant, along the Ohio River.

The chemical giant DuPont made an offer Monday to pay more than half-a-billion dollars to settle water contamination lawsuits pending in federal court.


Glynis Board

A federal court in Ohio delivered a verdict this week awarding $10.5 million in punitive damages to a man with testicular cancer who, for years, was exposed through drinking water to the toxic chemicals DuPont used to make Teflon.

An Ohio man who says he got testicular cancer because of a chemical used to make Teflon is the latest plaintiff to have his case against DuPont Co. considered by a jury in federal court.

The Columbus Dispatch reports jurors in Columbus are deliberating after a four-week trial in the case of a Washington County resident, Kenneth Vigneron Sr. It's among 3,000 lawsuits against DuPont by Ohio and West Virginia residents.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For more than half a century along the Ohio River, the chemical company DuPont provided jobs for thousands of people. One chemical they produced is PFOA, commonly known as C8. It was a remarkably useful compound, used in “Teflon” non-stick cookware, stain-resistant fabrics, and even in some food wrappers.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Jurors awarded an additional $500,000 to the plaintiff in a case against the chemical company DuPont.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Jurors in an Ohio federal court say DuPont acted with malice by dumping chemical-tainted water from its West Virginia plant into the Ohio River.

The same jury on Wednesday said a chemical used by DuPont at the plant caused a man to get cancer and awarded him $5.1 million in compensatory damages.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Another of the 3,500 lawsuits alleging links between people's illnesses and DuPont discharging C8 into drinking water and the Ohio River is heading to trial in federal court in central Ohio this week.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the case against the Delaware-based chemical company alleges a Washington County man got testicular cancer because of C8, a chemical used to make Teflon.

Nikthestoned / wikimedia Commons

The City of Parkersburg will provide water to some parts of Vienna in response to high levels of a carcinogenic chemical in the town’s drinking water.

The Parkersburg Utility Board’s Assistant Manager Eric Bumgardner says the lower-third of Vienna, also known as the town’s commercial district, had its water switched over to Parkersburg’s water supply Wednesday.

This will remain in effect until a permanent fix is in place.

Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

 

Update: Friday, May 20, 2016 at 10:30 a.m.

 

The City of Vienna issued a statement today saying residents may bring clear containers to one of four locations between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to collect water for drinking and food preparation:

Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Dow Chemical and DuPont announced plans to merge late last year in a deal worth about $130 billion dollars. Both companies have long histories in West Virginia, where they’ve been top employers in the so-called “chemical valley.”  They used to compete, but now they are allies in what some West Virginians say feels like the continued death of the Industrial Age in the region. 

On this West Virginia morning we hear about two big mergers with a presence in the state and how they might affect the area. First, Glynis Board takes a look at the Dow-Dupont merger and it's potential impact on the community of Washington, West Vrginia. Also, Appalachia Health News’ Kara Lofton talks with Marketplace’s Dan Gorenstein and Leemore Dafny, director of Health Enterprise Management at Northwestern University about Cabell-Huntington Hospital's acquisition of St. Mary's. 

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

A southeast Ohio water district has settled its federal lawsuit against DuPont over allegations that the company contaminated the district's well fields with the chemical used to produce Teflon.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

A federal judge has rejected a motion arguing that evidence doesn't support punitive damages for an Ohio woman who says she got cancer after drinking water contaminated by a chemical discharged from a DuPont plant.

The case might help settle thousands of similar lawsuits about the chemical giant's dumping of C8 into local drinking water.

Plaintiff Clara Bartlett alleges Delaware-based DuPont didn't inform the public but knew potential risks posed by C8 that was deposited into the Ohio River by a plant near Parkersburg, West Virginia.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

A federal judge has refused to dismiss one of two test cases that could potentially help settle thousands of similar lawsuits against chemical giant DuPont.

The complaint by an Ohio woman alleges the Delaware-based company knew the potentially dangerous risks posed by a chemical its plant near Parkersburg, West Virginia, had been depositing into the Ohio River, but declined to inform the public.

“The Teflon Toxin” is the title of a series of three investigative reports that surfaced this month. The series examines the 70-year history of DuPont and the no-stick chemical called C8 used to coat Teflon pans and other products.

A decade ago it came to light that DuPont contaminated water sources in West Virginia and Ohio with the chemical, and soon after that the chemical is toxic. The use of the C8 was phased out of production this year at DuPont’s Washington Works plant just outside Parkersburg. But this September, the first of about 3,500 personal injury claims is coming to trial.

That’s one reason the investigative series was just published.

Keep Your Promises Campaign
KeepYourPromisesDupont.com

  The community-based organization Keep Your Promises Dupont released an open letter the C-8 Medical Panel asking for oversight in the court-mandated C-8 Medical Monitoring Program.


Department of Environmental Protection, DEP
Department of Environmental Protection

West Virginia environmental workers responded to a glycolic acid leak at a chemical plant in Belle.

Department of Environmental Protection spokeswoman Kelly Gillenwater says a team was dispatched to monitor the area around the DuPont plant after Wednesday's incident.

Gillenwater tells the Charleston Gazette the leak occurred when DuPont employees turned on a piece of equipment that had been shut down for maintenance.

DuPont blamed the leak on an equipment failure.

Keep Your Promises Campaign
KeepYourPromisesDupont.com

Mid-Ohio Valley residents launched a campaign this week in an effort to pressure DuPont, a chemical company, into complying with a 2005 settlement agreement and to educate community members on how they can monitor their health.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

A West Virginia man has filed suit against chemical company DuPont for contaminating his home's drinking water.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Mid-Ohio Valley residents exposed to a chemical used by a DuPont plant in West Virginia can now apply for free medical monitoring.

An attorney for Parkersburg-area plaintiffs, Harry Deitzler, says residents can apply for a free blood test and free medical screening to uncover diseases linked to the chemical C8.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Nine Ohio and West Virginia residents who have cancer and other diseases have filed federal lawsuits this month against chemical giant DuPont, alleging the company knowingly contaminated drinking-water supplies with a chemical used by one of its plants.