CSX

Office of Governor Earl Ray Tomblin

Federal officials have announced a $2.2 million proposed settlement with CSX Transportation to resolve the company's liability for water pollution violations stemming from a train derailment that caused an oil spill in West Virginia.

CSX
Clark Davis / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Railroad company CSX says it has cut 70 jobs at a locomotive shop in West Virginia, while 270 others continue to work at the facility.

Company spokesman Rob Doolittle says the shop in Huntington will remain open and keep servicing locomotives. Affected employees are eligible to seek positions at other nearby CSX facilities.

On this West Virginia Morning, we take a look at the Republican presidential candidates and their stances on fracking and the environment. We also get a report from Clark Davis about a soon-to-be-abandoned CSX building in Huntington and some of the plans for the space.

What's Next for CSX's Huntington Property?

Mar 22, 2016
CSX
Clark Davis / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

CSX announced in January it was closing administrative offices in downtown Huntington. That means the loss of 121 administrative jobs, but it also leaves the question of what happens to the building when CSX leaves.

The rail company announced that it will consolidate administration divisions from 10 to 9, moving administrative responsibilities from Huntington to five other divisions in Atlanta, Baltimore, Florence, Great Lakes and Louisville. CSX will continue running trains in the area and will keep open its Huntington locomotive shop. 

CSX Train
FastilyClone / Wikimedia Commons

Officials say 101 positions at a CSX Corp. facility in eastern Kentucky are being eliminated amid a slump in the coal industry.

CSX spokeswoman Melanie Cost told media that the company decided to make the cuts as a last resort. She said the facility in Russell primarily serves trains moving from coal fields in central Appalachia and there is no longer enough activity to support the jobs.

Updated at 3:12 p.m. on Dec. 24, 2015

Officials say no one was injured after a train that was carrying propane derailed in West Virginia.

CSX Spokeswoman Melanie Cost said six CSX train cars ran off the tracks in New Martinsville early Thursday and four of the cars fell on their sides.

WCHS-TV / via Mildred Coon

 A lawsuit filed stemming from a fiery February derailment of a CSX oil train in Mount Carbon has been moved to federal court.

The Register-Herald reports that the lawsuit by more than 200 residents was moved to U.S. District Court in Huntington at the request of the rail company. The lawsuit was initially filed in state court.

Office of Governor Earl Ray Tomblin

The Federal Railroad Administration is set to announce what caused a fiery oil train derailment in southern West Virginia in February.

The agency has scheduled a news conference Friday morning at BridgeValley Community and Technical College in Montgomery.

WCHS-TV / via Mildred Coon

A lawsuit has been filed against CSX Corp. on behalf of dozens of  southern West Virginia residents living near the site of a fiery oil train derailment.

Marshall County
Wikimedia / wikimedia

Authorities say a CSX chemical train has derailed in Marshall County. No chemicals were spilled.

WTOV-TV reports four cars left the tracks near the Axial chemical plant around 2:30 a.m. Thursday near New Martinsville. Two cars that derailed carried chlorine and two others that left the tracks contained hydrochloric acid.

WCHS-TV / via Mildred Coon

CSX has invited the public to attend a meeting to discuss the cleanup of a February oil-train derailment in southern West Virginia.

The meeting is set for Tuesday evening at the Glen Ferris Inn.

Office of Governor Earl Ray Tomblin

  Federal regulators say CSX Transportation has agreed to a long-term plan for cleaning up and restoring the area around a fiery oil train derailment in southern West Virginia.

Under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency order released Friday, CSX must submit a comprehensive plan within three weeks.

Investigators have not determined what caused 27 of the CSX train's 109 cars to go off the tracks during a Feb. 16 snowstorm in Mount Carbon.  

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer Angie Vallier

Investigators from the Federal Railroad Administration and the Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration are on the scene of Monday's oil train derailment near Mount Carbon, W.Va. The incident sparked massive fireballs stretching hundreds of feet in the air. One home was destroyed in the incident and the homeowner was treated for smoke inhalation and then released. 

1. Some initial reports from the scene turned out to be incorrect.

Office of Governor Earl Ray Tomblin

  The fiery derailment of a train carrying crude oil in West Virginia is one of three in the past year involving tank cars that already meet a higher safety standard than what federal law requires — leading some to suggest even tougher requirements that industry representatives say would be costly.

Hundreds of families were evacuated and nearby water treatment plants were temporarily shut down after cars derailed from a train carrying 3 million gallons of North Dakota crude Monday, shooting fireballs into the sky, leaking oil into a Kanawha River tributary and burning down a house nearby. It was snowing at the time, but it is not yet clear if weather was a factor.

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An early 20th century pedestrian bridge in Tunnelton is coming down.

The bridge spanning CSX tracks is scheduled to be demolished on Tuesday. CSX says the bridge was built in 1912 in the Preston County town.