Confederate Monuments

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Harrison County Commission revisited a discussion on the possible removal of a statute of Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson that sits in front of the courthouse in Clarksburg.

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore a couple contentious topics. We look at the impacts of Confederate monuments standing in our region, and we hear a report on Universal Basic Income and whether it could be one answer as residents in West Virginia experience unemployment due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A group of 30 organizations across West Virginia is calling on the Capitol Building Commission and Gov. Jim Justice to take down a statue of Stonewall Jackson from the state Capitol grounds.

Eric Douglas / WVPB

The Charleston City Council voted on Monday to donate a plaque honoring the Kanawha Riflemen, a company of Confederate soldiers, to a West Virginia history museum. The resolution didn’t specify which one but mentioned the Craik-Patton House Museum  in Charleston as a possibility.

Courtesy Photo / Marshall University

Updated Tuesday, July 7, 2020 at 2:45 p.m.

The Marshall University Board of Governors voted unanimously Tuesday to remove the name of a slaveholder and Confederate soldier from the building that houses the university’s education program. The name change comes as other markers and monuments honoring the Confederacy have been removed by choice or by force across the nation. 

Eric Douglas/ WVPB

The City of Charleston quietly removed part of a Confederate memorial Monday, joining other cities and states across the country who are taking a closer look at structures honoring Confederate soldiers and generals.


Liam Niemeyer/ Ohio Valley ReSource

Toddlers yelling, running around the hardwood floors and leaving cracker crumbs on the ground. A laptop screen dented by a soup can dropped by a kid. At one point, a room covered from ceiling to floor with hand prints after kids were left alone with a paint can. 

But for the moment, Sherman Neal’s kids — two-year-old Skyler and three-year-old Jett — are on the leather couch, fixated on another "Max & Ruby" cartoon. 


Mason Adams / For Inside Appalachia

Culture can connect us to our kindred spirits across great distances, even during a global pandemic. It helps build bridges in other ways, too. In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we hear stories about cultural ties that bind us to people across the globe.

On this West Virginia Morning, while some statues of confederate generals have been toppled or ordered down in some cities and towns, the debate carries on in other places. We hear about one man’s mission to bring down a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee in Murray, Kentucky. Also, we hear about Appalachia’s connection to Wales through music, and we listen to this week’s Mountain Stage song of the week.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting


West Virginia seceded from Virginia 157 years ago to join the Union and reject the Confederate States of America. While Confederate monuments have been toppled or ordered down elsewhere across the country, they still stand in West Virginia.

There are 21 statues, memorials and other markers honoring Confederate generals and soldiers in the state — on state park resorts, schools, elsewhere according to data compiled by the Southern Poverty Law Center

On this West Virginia Morning, in the only state born of the American Civil War, we explore the discussion of whether to remove statues that celebrate confederate civil war heroes. Also, an update on where pipelines and hiking trails intersect.

As statues of Confederate generals have been toppled or ordered down across the American South, all still stand in West Virginia, the only state born out of the American Civil War.

One hundred fifty-seven years ago Saturday, West Virginia seceded from Virginia to join the Union and reject the Confederacy.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

 

Updated Wedneasday, June 17, 2020 at 10:25 p.m.

 

The Harrison County Commission voted Wednesday not to remove a statue of a Confederate general that stands in front of the county courthouse in downtown Clarksburg. Calls for the removal of monuments and markers honoring Confederate figures come amid protests against systemic racism and police brutality.

Sydney Boles / Ohio Valley ReSource

 


By now it’s become a familiar scene: Marchers fill the streets with placards proclaiming “Black Lives Matter,” and chants fill the air as the demonstrators recite the names of those lost. 

But there’s something different about some of these protests around the Ohio Valley in the past week. They’re not just happening in the larger cities such as Louisville, Lexington, Columbus and Cincinnati. Smaller college towns such as Athens, Ohio, and Morgantown, West Virginia, have seen marches. Communities in Kentucky farmland and the heart of Appalachian coal country, such as Hazard and Harlan, Kentucky, have seen people protesting against racial injustice and police violence. 

 

Us & Them: Should History Be Set In Stone?

Jan 23, 2020

When we learn our history, we see things that reflect our past. Paintings of famous battles and statues of men who were heroes to some. But how we interpret our legacy changes. Time can warp our notion of a once righteous cause.

There are examples around the world of ways we have edited our past. In the U.S., recent decisions to move Confederate monuments and take down Confederate flags. But the effort to cleanse the past is global.

Brian Turner / Wikimedia Commons

A plaque honoring Confederate soldiers has been removed from a West Virginia courthouse.

The Journal reports the Jefferson County Commission voted 3-2 last week to remove the plaque and it has been taken down.

Jenkins Hall
Marshall University

Marshall University has hosted a meeting to hear opinions on whether to change the name of a building honoring a Confederate Civil War general.

Jenkins Hall
Marshall University

A proposal to rename a building at Marshall University that's named after a Confederate general is gaining attention.

Scott Threlkeld/AP

The tragedy in Charlottesville, VA makes us wonder if it’s possible to reconcile different versions of history. This episode features two American foreign correspondents of color who’ve sought to answer this quandary, flying from Kenya to Louisiana to report on protests over the dismantling of Confederate monuments.

Roxy Todd/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

About 80 people attended a candlelight vigil and a protest rally in Charleston Sunday evening. Attendees rallied at the West Virginia State Capitol to speak against racism, white supremacy, and to ask for the removal of the statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson from the Capitol grounds.

Speakers included religious leaders, who spoke about coming together as a community following Saturday’s violent white supremacy protests in Charlottesville, Virginia. The rally was organized by Rise Up WV, a progressive community organizing group.