Concussion

Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

At the Charleston Civic Center, pairs of boxers in four rings are fighting bouts at the same time. For the fourth year, Charleston is hosting the boxing Junior Olympics. Almost 700 athletes from all over the country, ages 8-18, are competing for a national title in their age and weight divisions.

The kids are lithe and share an expression of determination as coaches check wraps, adjust headgear and pat thin shoulders on the back. The fighters face one another, tap gloves and begin.

Marshall University

Are concussions more prevalent, or are more people paying closer attention to symptoms that are tied to concussions? 

Julian Bailes, MD, Director of Neurosurgery and co-director of the NorthShore University HealthSystem Neurological Institute will be in Huntington Friday night to speak about concussion prevention and what’s next. 

Dr. Julian Bales was portrayed in the 2015 movie “Concussion.” The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is hosting Dr. Bailes Friday night at 7 in the Memorial Student center.

Marshall University
Wikipedia / en.wikipedia.org

A concussion expert featured in a 2015 movie will speak on brain injury next week at Marshall University.

Neurosurgeon Julian E. Bailes, who was portrayed by actor Alec Baldwin in the film "Concussion," will present a program on understanding and preventing brain injury in sports.

football helmet
wikimedia / mdscottis

The state Board of Education has given final approval to a rule dealing with how high schools handle sports concussions.

The board approved the rule during its monthly meeting this week in Charleston.

“This is a significant step in how we protect all of our athletes from the short- and long-term impact of concussions,” said West Virginia Board of Education President Gayle Manchin.

“Now a certified medical professional must clear student athletes before they can get back into practice or play.”

Newcastle H.S. athletic trainer Damon Glass administers the King Devick test
Courtesy the producers of The Smartest Team

For some high school youth, playing for a winning football team can be the ultimate dream. But what are the risks in a sport that now goes beyond the high school field? Players not only compete with other teams, but their performance on the gridiron can lead to scholarships at universities that could ultimately determine their future. Greater competition, some say, is leading to more injuries, which could also determine a teenager's future.