coal mining

Catherine Moore

This story was supported by High Plains News. It’s part of the ‘The Future of Coal’a collaboration of The Allegheny Front, West Virginia Public Broadcasting, and Inside Energy.

Coal Stock Pile
www.mine-engineer.com

Southern Coal Corp. says it plans to hire 100 miners at four surface mines in Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia.

Two mines are in Wise County, Virginia. One is in Letcher County, Kentucky, and the other is in Raleigh County, West Virginia.

What Happens to the Land Once the Coal is Gone?

Apr 3, 2015
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, we begin a series of reports about coal’s decline in central Appalachia from our news partners at The Allegheny Front in Pennsylvania.  And our Mountain Stage song of the week features a performance by a long time friend of host Larry Groce.  That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Data analyzed by SNL Energy's Taylor Kuykendall and Hira Fawad suggests underground coal mines in Appalachia that have unionized are not only safer, but also more productive.

In Kentucky, A Prairie Made by Coal

Mar 27, 2015
Reid R. Frazier

Patrick Angel pulls his pickup truck off a small road in the hills of Eastern Kentucky, and points to a long ridge covered with dried, brown grass.

“If you didn’t know where you were, you'd think you were standing in a prairie land in South Dakota or Wyoming, because it’s all grass,” says Angel, a forester with the U.S. Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM).

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Jessica Lilly talks with the Federal Co-Chair of the Appalachian Regional Commission about the region’s progress over the last 50 years.  And Jim Lange profiles jazz guitarist Ryan Kennedy who is releasing his first solo CD tonight.  Kennedy is a member of the Mountain Stage band. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


At the legislature today, the Commissioner of West Virginia’s Bureau of Public Health has concerns with a bill changing the way immunization exemptions are granted in the state. We’ll talk with Dr. Rahul Gupta.  And constitutional questions are debated in both chambers. In the Senate,  lawmakers take up a resolution calling for a national convention of the states. In the house, delegates debate second amendment gun rights.  The fireworks in both chambers tonight on The Legislature Today.

Lung Transplant Approved for Black Lung Victim

Oct 24, 2014
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Jessica Lilly checks in with a victim of black lung whose lung transplant was approved after his story aired on West Virginia Public Radio in June.  And Chris Smithers sings the Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

In this episode, we hear from Larry Mustain, who grinds heirloom corn at his family’s mill in West Virginia.

And we'll learn more about traveling along the Bourbon Whiskey Trail in Kentucky?

We'll also talk with, Jordan Bridges, a coal miner in southern West Virginia who is worried as more and more mines are laying off workers.


Remembering Jimmy Weekley, Frog Watching in Va.

Aug 29, 2014

In Pennsylvania, there’s all sorts of noises associated with natural gas drilling.  One company is trying to be sensitive.

In West Virginia, we remember Jimmy Weekley – the last man on the mountain.

And in Virginia, an executive chef is looking for frogs, not for their legs, but for their distinctive sound.

State Surface Mine Board to Consider Kanawha Mine

Aug 21, 2014
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning Ashton Marra reports from the second day of testimony about the surface mine located near the Kanawha State Forest. And Beth Vorhees talks with two local actors who appear in the film “Moving Mountains” which was filmed in West Virginia. 

What's Next for Boone County Coal Miners?

Aug 19, 2014
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, reporter Catherine Moore attended the coal festival in Boone County to ask residents there what’s next for them after layoffs in the coal industry.  And Liz McCormick reports from Jefferson County where libraries are rallying for community support.

For State Impact Pennsylvania's report about natural gas drilling in state forests click here. 

AllVoices.com

Twenty-two miners were killed in accidents in the mining industry during the first half of 2014, including 8 coal miners, according to a summary by the U.S. Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration.

 

That's compared to 18 miners who were killed in the first half of 2013.

In the second quarter of this year alone, 14 miners died – five in coal mining and nine in metal and nonmetal mining.

Roxy Todd

85-year-old Roland Micklem is still fasting at the West Virginia Capitol Building. He began his fast ten days ago to draw attention to the effects of climate change, and he says he will continue to go without food. Since July 7th, Micklem has eaten no food and has consumed only water, juice and coffee.

“My health is excellent. I am very much encouraged and motivated by the reception I've been receiving by the people we've run across. Everyone has been supportive and cooperative,” says Micklem.

Coal Stock Pile
www.mine-engineer.com

The coal industry is worried that the Environmental Protection Agency’s newly proposed regulations on carbon emissions will cripple the nation’s coal economy.

With 95 percent of the energy produced in West Virginia coming from coal fired power plants, many within the industry feel the state will be the hardest hit by the new proposal.

Roger Horton, a retired miner from Logan County paints a grim picture already evolving in coal country. Since March of 2012 thousands of miners have lost their jobs.  Horton said the EPA new proposed rules ignore the economic impact of its standards on countless coal mining families.

Federal mine safety officials are holding the first of several meetings on the Obama administration's new coal dust rule in Beaver, West Virginia.

The Labor Department's Mine Safety and Health Administration meets with industry representatives Thursday morning at the National Mine Health and Safety Academy. 

Center for Public Integrity

This week the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration released updated regulations designed to drastically reduce the amount of coal dust miners inhale, hoping to cut back on the prevalence of black lung disease.

AllVoices.com

The Obama administration is cutting the amount of coal dust allowed in coal mines in an effort to help reduce black lung disease.

Black lung is an irreversible and potentially deadly disease caused by exposure to coal dust. The government estimates that the disease has killed more than 76,000 miners since 1968.

Patriot Coal

Patriot Coal plans to cut production at two mining complexes in southern West Virginia and potentially lay off workers.Patriot announced today that it has issued 60-day layoff notices to workers at its Wells mining complex near Wharton and its Corridor G complex near Danville. 

The federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification, or WARN, Act requires companies to provide notice to employees if large layoffs are possible.

"PBC Judicial Forum"
Rick Neuhoff / Flickr

A former mine boss is asking a federal appeals court to toss out his conviction for his actions at the West Virginia mine where an explosion killed 29 miners in 2010. 

Pennsylvania is comparing regulations for above ground storage tanks after the spill in West Virginia.

While some residents in a Kentucky community are using unique strategies to oppose a strip mine, others are looking forward to the mine opening.

One school in West Virginia is working to meet the needs of all deaf and blind students.

Former coal miner Joe Stanley says he lost his job after a conflict with management, when he, as union president, demanded to know more about the chemicals that were being used in the mine. "I watched the coal industry poison our water for years. Now they're telling us not to drink the water? We've been dumping this stuff into unlined ponds and into old mines for years," he says. One of those chemicals, Stanley says, was MCHM.

Coal Stock Pile
www.mine-engineer.com

An Economic Transition Summit is being held this weekend at Hawks Nest Park in Fayette County. Representatives from throughout Appalachia are meeting to discuss the development of economic opportunities beyond coal.

The meeting is being hosted by The Alliance for Appalachia, a coalition of 15 groups across the region working to end mountaintop removal, while building local economies.

Justin Steiner / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

What are the potential side effects of cracker plants planned in West Virginia and Pennsylvania?

Some folks in Eastern Kentucky are having a potentially explosive problem with their wells.

Some hot doings on a cold day recently at West Virginia University.

And new inductees join the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame.

Jessica Lilly

Some miners are looking for new occupations because they worry this current down swing in coal production won’t be an ordinary ‘bust’. Workforce West Virginia is reporting that more than 4,200 West Virginia coal miners have lost their jobs since March 2012. Although mining jobs were created during that same, the agency couldn't quantify the number. 

Reid R. Frazier / The Allegheny Front

How much mine-able coal is left in Appalachia?

An old coal company store in Southern West Virginia has some spooky history.

We revisit the story of the Greenbrier Ghost, through the voices of school children.

And learn how growing a garden benefits women in a Pocahontas County prison facility.

AllVoices.com

Hundreds of coal miners are expected to lose their jobs in West Virginia this month. The federal government announced yesterday that the State was given a nearly two million dollar emergency grant from the U.S. Department of Labor.

The federal dollars will provide retraining and reemployment services to dislocated coal miners and their families.

Coal Stock Pile
www.mine-engineer.com

A study released Wednesday says minable coal will run out much sooner than expected. The report comes from an environmental organization and the author claims it’s science based and not politically driven.

The report is published by Clean Energy Action, Colorado based environmental organization that works to push the transition from fossil fuels to other energy sources.  

Ghostly stories from the Whipple Company Store

Oct 29, 2013
Whipple company store
wikimedia / Wikimedia Commons

Built during a time of labor strife in the southern coalfields, the Whipple Company Store in Fayette County is one of those buildings that just LOOKS haunted. Every Halloween, the owners offer tours full of history, folklore, and ghost stories. Producer Catherine Moore set out to do a fun piece about the reported paranormal activity at the store with a couple of local ghost hunters. Well, she got more than she bargained for and found out that there’s a lot more to the so-called hauntings, and to the history of the store, than meets the eye.

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