coal mining

Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

If you live near a mining site – either old or active - is your health at risk? That’s what a committee from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering & Medicine is trying to find out.

 

Jessica Lilly

Coal mining has touched so many aspects of life in Appalachia. The coal industry has provided more than just jobs — it’s helped build towns, bridges and it’s even provided money for many Appalachians to go to college. We also have a deep cultural connection to coal and its history.

Still, there’s no denying the coal industry has changed the landscape of our mountains, and infected many miners with a deadly disease known as black lung.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia lawmakers have begun advancing revisions in coal mining regulation after removing provisions that would have sharply reduced safety inspections of underground mines.

The Senate Committee on Energy, Industry and Mining approved a substitute bill that would have chopped required annual state safety inspections from four to one.

Underground Mine, Miners, Mining
Robert PEnergy / wikimedia commons

Local government entities such as cities and public school systems could lose some tax funding after West Virginia officials decreased the tax rate for temporarily idled coal mining equipment.

Property Tax Division director Jeff Amburgey says the change affects mining equipment that's expected to start back up again. Lawmakers such as former senator Art Kirkendoll have said a lower tax rate may encourage companies to keep equipment in West Virginia mines.

Underground Mine, Miners, Mining
Robert PEnergy / wikimedia commons

The nation's coal mines are nearing a record low mark for on-the-job deaths for the third year in a row and have a chance to keep the number of fatal accidents in single digits for the first time.

With just a day left in 2016, U.S. coal mines have recorded nine deaths. West Virginia had four, Kentucky had two and there was one each in Alabama, Illinois and Pennsylvania. The low number can be attributed to far fewer coal mining jobs and tougher enforcement of mining safety rules.

Democrats: McConnell Fix for Miners’ Health Care Inadequate

Dec 7, 2016
Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press File Photo

Senate Democrats on Tuesday blasted a proposal by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to temporarily protect health care benefits for thousands of retired coal miners.

Candace Nelson

If your father worked in the coal mines, chances are you remember his lunch or dinner bucket and the food that he brought to work. For many families, the extra food that was packed away in these dinner buckets was practical -- it would be there just in case an accident happened.


Roger May

  This year marks the 60th anniversary of the publication of a series of novels called The Beulah Quintet.  The novels are by the late Mary Lee Settle, a writer who set out to capture moments in West Virginia history when a revolutionary change was at stake. Today's economic uncertainty here in Appalachia has many people wondering whether we are also living in the midst of a transition.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, retired miners are worried about their pension and health benefits and are relying on Congress to help them and we’ll go to a summer camp for visually impaired children. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, 35 schools were damaged in last month’s historic flooding.  With some schools set to open in just over a month, school officials are on a tight deadline to fix them.  Also, State Senator Chris Walters has been volunteering in his district since flooding began.  He talks about the need for more volunteers to assist our flooded neighbors. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

W. Va. Supreme Court Candidate Profile: Wayne King

May 3, 2016

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from Mingo County where Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton explained her position on coal and the communities that rely on it.  Also, Liz McCormick profiles Wayne King, a Clay County attorney who is running for a seat on the West Virginia Supreme Court. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Roger May

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the publication of a series of novels called The Beulah Quintet.  The novels are by the late Mary Lee Settle, a writer who set out to capture moments in West Virginia history when a revolutionary change was at stake. Today's economic uncertainty here in Appalachia has many people wondering whether we are also living in the midst of a transition.

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra continues her conversation with the sisters of one of the miners killed six years ago this week in the Upper Big Branch mine and what they will tell the judge this morning at the sentencing of Don Blankenship, who’s company owned the mine.

Lance Booth

In this week's episode of Inside Appalachia, we hear about what it’s like to actually work in a coal mine. So often we hear about miners from environmentalists or people who proudly declare they are Friends of Coal. But so much about what we hear about coal mining these days is full of political agendas.

State officials are investigating a coal mine accident that killed a worker in southern West Virginia.

West Virginia Department of Commerce spokeswoman Leslie Smithson says the fatality involving a belt roller occurred early Monday at Greenbrier Minerals LLC's Lower War Eagle Mine near Cyclone in Wyoming County.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a report from Inside Energy, a collaborative journalism project based in Colorado about that state’s coal mine clean up costs.  That story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

State Lawmakers Consider Substance Abuse

Oct 19, 2015

On West Virginia Morning, Liz McCormick reports on efforts being considered by state lawmakers to address substance abuse.  Also, Greenbrier hotel owner Jim Justice is running for governor, but he’s taking criticism for not paying his coal company taxes in eastern Kentucky. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Listen to the Latest from the Blankenship Trial

Oct 7, 2015

  On West Virginia Morning the latest from the trial of Don Blankenship, the former CEO of Massey Energy.  We'll talk with reporter Ashton Marra who has been sitting with other reporters in a separate courtroom from the proceedings and Charleston attorney Mike Hissam.  That's on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting - telling West Virginia's story.  

On West Virginia Morning, Democrats in the U.S. Senate walked out of a subcommittee meeting yesterday to protest legislation meant to counteract the Clean Power Plan.  Also, leaders in the state legislature want to rescind the agreement that brought the Common Core education standards to West Virginia.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Radio news – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, Beth Vorhees talks with John Deskins, Director of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at West Virginia University about the impact the Clean Power Plan will have on the state’s coal industry.  That conversation on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Radio news – telling West Virginia’s story.


Prosecutors say in court documents that evidence about the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster is a necessary part of the government's criminal case against former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship.

The Front Porch Podcast
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Increasingly, working class men in Appalachia can't find work.

Central Appalachia has seen thousands of layoffs in the coal industry this decade. More and more, women are the main breadwinners.

W. Va. Company to Sell Mine Equipment to China

Jun 18, 2015

A delegation from China was in West Virginia today to sign agreements with representatives from the state's business, educational and government agencies.  

Zhang Wendong, the Educational Department
Director-General of the Shanxi province in China was one of the dignitaries signing memorandums of understanding to promote educational exchanges and business collaborations.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear from the coal reporter at SNL Energy about job losses in the Kentucky and West Virginia coalfields.  Details about those number are on our website.  Also, Glynis Board reports that the state has the highest number of injury related deaths in the country.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Coal Stock Pile
www.mine-engineer.com

Representatives from the coal industry in West Virginia met with local and state lawmakers Tuesday to discuss the future of the coal industry. Their talk focused on combating Federal environmental regulations, including the EPA’s Clean Power Plan, a proposed federal rule meant to cut carbon emissions from existing power plants.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, the president of the United Mine Workers union rallies members to fight the U.S. EPA that he says are causing thousands of job losses in the coalfields. And we’ll travel to Gilbert in Mingo County to find out how the community is overcoming challenges to access to health care.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a report about old, abandoned coal mines and what the future holds to clean them up.  And The Earls of Lester perform the Mountain Stage song of the week on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, in the continuing series on the future of coal, a report about what’s next for coal miners.  That story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Cleaning Up Coal's Legacy of Fires and Landslides

Apr 24, 2015
Jim Holliday is a veteran mine inspector in Kentucky.
Reid R. Frazier / The Allegheny Front

  This story is part of the ‘The Future of Coal’—a collaboration of The Allegheny FrontWest Virginia Public Broadcasting, and Inside Energy.

Many of Appalachia’s coal mines were dug before the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 was passed. Thousands of problem mines throughout the region are not subject to that law’s protections. These so-called pre-law mines come with a bevy of issues—they fill up with water, cause landslides, and catch fire.

Concerns About Coal's Future in the American West

Apr 20, 2015
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from Fayette County where citizens are being asked to pass a 65 million dollar bond issue to repair aging school buildings.  And we travel to the state of Wyoming, now the nation’s coal capitol.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Pages