coal fired power plants

Kenn W. Kiser / morguefile.com

 


  A new study finds the closure of coal-fired power plants and transition to natural gas generation across the United States over a decade saved an estimated 26,610 lives due to a reduction in air pollution, with about a fifth of those avoided deaths in the Ohio Valley. 

Brian Peshek/ The Allegheny Front

The economy of central Appalachia has long revolved around extractive industries: timber, coal, oil and natural gas. The jobs associated with these industries are often good paying jobs. They also can bring environmental and health issues to the region. 

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll explore how an increase in natural gas development has brought challenges and concerns, both for our health and our natural environment. But for some, the jobs and economic benefits that come with this increased activity are welcome, especially as so many jobs have left our region in recent years. 


Opioids, Coal-Fueled Energy & A Photographer Being Homesick for Appalachia

Dec 13, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a U.S. House subcommittee focused on the opioid epidemic in Appalachia during a hearing on Capitol Hill.

The Allegheny Front's Reid Frazier reports on a federal commission that will decide what to do with a Trump administration proposal aimed at keeping coal and nuclear plants open. 

RIck Perry
Eric Gay / AP

After touring one of the few recently built coal-fired power plants in the U.S., Energy Secretary Rick Perry says they're important for the country's future.

Perry says a stable baseload of electricity is important and this technology provides "the ability to deliver a secure, economical and environmentally good source of energy."

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The CEO of the nation’s biggest public utility said Tuesday that the agency isn’t going to reopen coal-fired power plants under President Donald Trump, who has promised a comeback for the downtrodden coal industry.

Tennessee Valley Authority CEO Bill Johnson said he thinks very little will actually change for the federal utility under Trump.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Monday is the final day the federal Environmental Protection Agency will accept comments on their proposed rule to limit carbon emissions from coal fired power plants.

The EPA announced the rule in June of this year aimed at cutting CO2 emissions for the country by 30 percent by 2030. Individually if the rule were approved as is, West Virginia would have to cut its emissions by 15 percent compared to 2012 measurements.