Church

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West Virginia Governor Jim Justice’s statewide stay-at-home order contains several exceptions, including going to the grocery store, receiving medical attention, and going to and from a place of worship.

Even though residents are allowed to attend religious services in the state, most churches have suspended services for the safety of their congregants. These churches are now turning to alternative forms of sermon delivery.

 

On this West Virginia Morning, we continue our focus on small business issues with a look at long term impacts the coronavirus crisis may have on communities in southern West Virginia that rely on tourism. Also, in today’s show, we hear how churchgoers in West Virginia are staying connected through the pandemic, and we hear a review on a new book titled “The Third Rainbow Girl: The Long Life of a Double Murder in Appalachia” by Emma Copley Eisenberg.

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore how to stay connected to one’s faith while houses of worship are closed. We also bring you a few moments of Zen, courtesy of the West Virginia Botanic Garden, and we listen to this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

E-WV / WV Humanities Council

On August 23, 1970, the first Mormon “stake” in West Virginia was organized in Charleston. It was an important milestone because it demonstrated that the Mormon religion had grown significantly in West Virginia.

BotMultichillT / wikimedia Commons

A Huntington church cancelled services following a fire that damaged the building.

Media outlets report that the fire broke out early Sunday morning at Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church.

Montgomery
Mackensen / wikimedia commons

A historic former black church in Montgomery has become the target of vandalism.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that vandals have broken down the doors and busted the windows of the First Baptist Church, which has been empty since July 2012. They've also broken antique cups and plates and scattered hymnals and other church materials on the floor.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It’s been 59 years since the Curtis Freewill Baptist Church in Harpers Ferry has been open with a regular congregation. This historical African-American church was the main building of worship during the days of Storer College, a predominantly black school that first began as a place to teach former slaves and eventually grew into a full-fledged degree-granting institution.