Calhoun County

July 10, 1889: Historian Boyd Stutler Born in Gilmer County

Jul 10, 2019
Boyd Stutler
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

Historian Boyd Stutler was born in Gilmer County on July 10, 1889. At 18, he became the owner, editor, and publisher of the Grantsville News in neighboring Calhoun County. Three years later, Stutler was elected mayor of Grantsville.

During World War I, he rose to the rank of sergeant. Throughout his life, Stutler remained active in veterans’ affairs. He served as managing editor of the American Legion magazine for 18 years. And, as a war correspondent in the Pacific, he witnessed the official Japanese surrender ending World War II.

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Stargazers are being invited to watch the sky over central West Virginia this weekend.

The fourth annual Calhoun Stargaze is set for Friday through Sunday at the Calhoun County Park in Grantsville. The park is known for its pitch-dark conditions for favorable nighttime viewing.

WV State Police Cruiser
WCHS-TV

West Virginia State Police detachments in three locations are closing at the end of the year. The agency said Tuesday Grantsville, Elizabeth and Hundred will close.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

As millions of Americans head to the polls Tuesday, just one week ago, children across the nation voted for the next presidential candidate in a mock election. The “Every Kid Votes!” event began with the 2004 presidential race, and every election year since, school children across the country have accurately voted for America’s next president. Will that trend continue this year? 

http://www.ForestWander.com [CC BY-SA 3.0 us (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en)], via Wikimedia Commons

Amateur astronomers are signed up to watch the sky over central West Virginia this weekend.

The third annual Calhoun Stargaze is set for Friday through Sunday at the Calhoun County Park in Grantsville. The park is known for its pitch-dark conditions for favorable nighttime viewing.

Josh Saul

Since the show began almost two years ago, A Change of Tune has highlighted some of the best up-and-coming artists out of these West Virginia hills with podcast-y chats ranging from The Sea The Sea to Coyotes in BoxesQiet to Bud Carroll and beyond.

But those interviews have been a bit infrequent, and since West Virginia Day is coming up (not to mention A Change of Tune’s second birthday), we thought we’d do something special: 30 days, 30 brand new #WVmusic interviews that range from Morgantown alt-rockers and Parkersburg singer-songwriters to West Virginia music venues and regional artist management and beyond, all of which contribute to this state’s wild and wonderful music scene.

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Amateur astronomers are seeking nice dark places where they can watch the nighttime sky.  They just might find it in Calhoun County.

Saturday night stargazers will set up their equipment in a park near Grantsville to see just how dark it is.

Tim Ezzell is a researcher at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.  He’s leading a team of other UT researchers and officials in Calhoun County to determine if this area is dark enough to become an attractive tourist destination.

“We looked at maps and charts and sure enough Calhoun was about the darkest place left in the Eastern United States," Exell explained.  

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Scott Baue / U.S. Department of Agriculture

  Voters in five West Virginia counties have restored the right to hunt on private land on Sundays.

Unofficial returns show the measure was approved Tuesday in Braxton, Calhoun, Nicholas, Webster and Wirt counties. Voters in Gilmer and Lewis counties rejected the proposal.

In 2001, lawmakers allowed counties to hold elections on whether to allow Sunday hunting on private lands. The following year, all 41 counties that put the question on their ballots voted to ban it.