C8

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A bipartisan group of U.S. Senators including West Virginia Republican Shelley Moore Capito this week introduced two bills aimed at further regulating a group of toxic chemicals known as PFAS.

Dave Mistich / WVPB

This story was updated at 4:15 p.m.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday it will move forward with a series of actions to regulate toxic fluorinated chemicals, including proposing drinking water limits by the end of this year. But environment and public health advocates say that timeline is unacceptable.

 

U.S. Senate

During a sometimes contentious confirmation hearing Wednesday on his nomination to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler was pressed by members of the Senate Committee on Environmental and Public Works about the impact of the government shutdown on the agency as well as his beliefs on climate change.

Wheeler noted one casualty of the ongoing partial government shutdown, now in its fourth week, is that a long-awaited long-awaited plan on regulating the PFAS group of chemicals has been delayed.  

 

 

 

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Environmental Protection Agency officials told a Congressional panel Thursday that the agency will announce by the end of the year whether it will take the next step to regulate a group of toxic fluorinated chemicals found in some water systems in the Ohio Valley.

The PFAS group of chemicals, which include PFOA or C-8, were widely used to make nonstick products and flame retardants and have been detected in at least 10 water systems in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia. Exposure has been linked to a number of health effects.

Water
Jasonanaggie / Wikimedia Commons

The Trump administration today released a politically charged study on the health impacts of perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS chemicals, including the compound known as C8, which has been detected in some water systems in the Ohio Valley.

 

The draft report, released by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), finds these fluorinated chemicals, which are used in some nonstick products and flame retardants, can endanger human health at levels 7 to 10 times lower than the Environmental Protection Agency has previously said were safe.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said today the agency is prepared to take action to limit exposure of  widely-used toxic chemicals used to make non-stick items. 

PFAS is a category of man-made chemicals that includes PFOA, PFOS, C8, GenX, and many other chemicals with stain resistant, non-stick and waterproof properties. Several communities across the Ohio Valley have detected PFAS chemicals in drinking water and a few have significant contamination.

The chemical giant DuPont made an offer Monday to pay more than half-a-billion dollars to settle water contamination lawsuits pending in federal court.


DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued an order expanding the area for required testing of water wells for the chemical C8.

The Parkersburg News and Sentinel reports that C8 was used for years to manufacture Teflon at a Wood County DuPont plant. A science panel has since discovered a link between C8 and illnesses, including certain cancers.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

The third case of some 3500 against the chemical company DuPont reached an initial verdict today. The case stems from the company’s widespread water contamination with a chemical known as C8.


An Ohio man who says he got testicular cancer because of a chemical used to make Teflon is the latest plaintiff to have his case against DuPont Co. considered by a jury in federal court.

The Columbus Dispatch reports jurors in Columbus are deliberating after a four-week trial in the case of a Washington County resident, Kenneth Vigneron Sr. It's among 3,000 lawsuits against DuPont by Ohio and West Virginia residents.

The city of Vienna is back on its own water system and no longer has to rely on Parkersburg's help.

The Parkersburg News and Sentinel reports that Vienna Mayor Randy Rapp and Parkersburg Mayor Jimmy Colombo on Tuesday morning turned the valve shutting off the water from Parkersburg to Vienna after almost six months of use.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For more than half a century along the Ohio River, the chemical company DuPont provided jobs for thousands of people. One chemical they produced is PFOA, commonly known as C8. It was a remarkably useful compound, used in “Teflon” non-stick cookware, stain-resistant fabrics, and even in some food wrappers.

Image: Hu et al, Environmental Science & Technology Letters

A study released this week highlights how 6 million Americans are living with drinking water that’s laced with toxic chemicals. Coupled with that report - another study that shows how those chemicals suppress the immune system - especially among children.


DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Jurors awarded an additional $500,000 to the plaintiff in a case against the chemical company DuPont.

Brian Turner / Wikimedia Commons

DuPont is presenting its case this week in one of the 3,500 lawsuits alleging a link between illnesses and the company discharging the chemical C8 into the Ohio River.

The Columbus Dispatch reports Anthony Playtis, who spent years overseeing testing and monitoring of workers at DuPont's Ohio River plant in West Virginia, testified that blood tests of plant workers were below the company's acceptable exposure limit.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Another of the 3,500 lawsuits alleging links between people's illnesses and DuPont discharging C8 into drinking water and the Ohio River is heading to trial in federal court in central Ohio this week.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the case against the Delaware-based chemical company alleges a Washington County man got testicular cancer because of C8, a chemical used to make Teflon.

Nikthestoned / wikimedia Commons

The City of Parkersburg will provide water to some parts of Vienna in response to high levels of a carcinogenic chemical in the town’s drinking water.

The Parkersburg Utility Board’s Assistant Manager Eric Bumgardner says the lower-third of Vienna, also known as the town’s commercial district, had its water switched over to Parkersburg’s water supply Wednesday.

This will remain in effect until a permanent fix is in place.

A company has agreed to pay for the installation of carbon filters in Vienna's water treatment plant.

Vienna Mayor Randy Rapp says the installation paid for by Wilmington, Delaware-based Chemours Co. will begin immediately.

Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

 

Update: Friday, May 20, 2016 at 10:30 a.m.

 

The City of Vienna issued a statement today saying residents may bring clear containers to one of four locations between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to collect water for drinking and food preparation:

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

A southeast Ohio water district has settled its federal lawsuit against DuPont over allegations that the company contaminated the district's well fields with the chemical used to produce Teflon.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Jurors are deliberating in the federal case of an Ohio woman who says she got cancer after drinking water contaminated by a chemical from a DuPont plant near Parkersburg, West Virginia.

It's one of two test cases that could influence thousands of similar lawsuits about the chemical giant's discharging of C8 into the Ohio River and drinking water.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

A federal judge has refused to dismiss one of two test cases that could potentially help settle thousands of similar lawsuits against chemical giant DuPont.

The complaint by an Ohio woman alleges the Delaware-based company knew the potentially dangerous risks posed by a chemical its plant near Parkersburg, West Virginia, had been depositing into the Ohio River, but declined to inform the public.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

The first of two test cases that could potentially help settle more than 3,500 lawsuits against chemical giant DuPont has begun in Ohio federal court.

The Columbus Dispatch reports the suit alleges that the Wilmington, Delaware-based company knew the potentially dangerous risks posed by a chemical that its plant near Parkersburg, West Virginia, had been depositing into the Ohio River, but it declined to inform the public.

On West Virginia Morning, reporter Glynis Board talks with the author of three investigative reports about the use of the chemical C8 by chemical giant DuPont at its plant outside of Parkersburg.  The first personal injury trials over the contamination of local waters with C8 begin next month.  That story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Mid-Ohio Valley residents exposed to a chemical used by a DuPont plant in West Virginia can now apply for free medical monitoring.

An attorney for Parkersburg-area plaintiffs, Harry Deitzler, says residents can apply for a free blood test and free medical screening to uncover diseases linked to the chemical C8.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

Nine Ohio and West Virginia residents who have cancer and other diseases have filed federal lawsuits this month against chemical giant DuPont, alleging the company knowingly contaminated drinking-water supplies with a chemical used by one of its plants.