Brett Kavanaugh

Sen. Joe Manchin
Simon Edelman, U.S. Energy Department

West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s pick for the U.S. Supreme Court. Manchin was the only Democrat in the Senate to cross party lines, and he did it in a very public way. Manchin’s vote didn’t surprise many Mountain State voters, but it left a lot of people in other states asking, “Why is he even a Democrat?”

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear about the growing culture around Appalachian food, and we’ll explore the latest happenings in politics with another installment of “Red State Blue State.”

Updated at 11:31 p.m. ET

A sharply divided Senate — reflecting a deeply divided nation — voted almost entirely along party lines Saturday afternoon to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A little more than two hours later, Kavanaugh was sworn in during a private ceremony as protesters stood on the court's steps.

With all turmoil surrounding Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination, red and blue state voters are taking the long view. This is the second episode of "Red State Blue State,"  WVPB's collaboration with KCRW in California.

J. Scott Applewhite

This is a developing story and may be updated.

Democratic U.S. Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia has voted to move forward with the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh. After weeks of holding out, Manchin said he will support the nominee in a final vote — all but ensuring the embattled nominee’s confirmation.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

Inside the Senate chamber Friday, lawmakers gathered to consider Brett Kavanaugh's controversial nomination to Supreme Court. There, the federal judge earned just enough support to advance to a final vote on his confirmation.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear perspectives about increasingly politicized Supreme Court nominations from a red state and a blue state.

From coast to coast, it’s all eyes on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination. “Red State, Blue State” is a weekly chat between Trump Country and the Blue Bubble, brought to you by KCRW and West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated: Tuesday, October 2, 2018 at 2:20 a.m.

Nine women have been arrested for trespassing after staging a sit-in at U.S. Senator Joe Manchin’s campaign headquarters in Charleston. The group was demanding that Manchin pledge to vote against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination -- based on allegations of sexual abuse waged against the judge.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Updated: September 28, 2018 at 5:59 p.m. 

 

Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court has passed the Senate Judiciary Committee on a party-line vote.U.S. Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia -- a key and as-of-yet-undecided vote in the Kavanaugh confirmation process -- says he supports a GOP Senator’s call for an FBI investigation of allegations of sexual assault waged against the Supreme Court nominee.

Updated at 9:05 p.m. ET

Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assaulting her in high school, has agreed to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, her attorneys said Saturday.

Bipartisan negotiators have tentatively agreed to work toward a Thursday hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee with Kavanaugh and Ford, but talks continue on a final agreement, according to multiple congressional sources.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s Senate confirmation hearings for U.S. Supreme Court began Tuesday, Sept. 4. Kavanaugh is considerably more conservative than the justice he would replace — a fact celebrated by the anti-abortion advocacy group the Susan B. Anthony List.

The organization has been touring several states during the past few weeks, urging democratic senators like West Virginia’s Joe Manchin to vote to confirm Kavanaugh.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, President Trump’s pick for the Supreme Court begins his Senate confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill Tuesday, Sept. 4. If confirmed, Judge Brett Kavanaugh will tip the court to the right and make overturning Roe versus Wade a possibility.

AP Photo / Pablo Martinez Monsivais

The first Democratic senator to sit down with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh said Monday he's not ready to say how he'll vote, but Kavanaugh did pick up the backing of Kentucky's Rand Paul, the only Republican in the narrowly divided Senate to have outwardly wavered in possible support.