Anna Sale

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On this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll learn more about how children are being affected by the opioid epidemic and what’s being done to help them. 


Josh Saul

Since the show began almost two years ago, A Change of Tune has highlighted some of the best up-and-coming artists out of these West Virginia hills with podcast-y chats ranging from The Sea The Sea to Coyotes in BoxesQiet to Bud Carroll and beyond.

But those interviews have been a bit infrequent, and since West Virginia Day is coming up (not to mention A Change of Tune’s second birthday), we thought we’d do something special: 30 days, 30 brand new #WVmusic interviews that range from Morgantown alt-rockers and Parkersburg singer-songwriters to West Virginia music venues and regional artist management and beyond, all of which contribute to this state’s wild and wonderful music scene.

In light of the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan, this week on Inside Appalachia we remember the West Virginia water crisis from 2014. We’ll also hear from people in the coalfields who don’t have access to clean water, day in and day out. And we’ll honor the traditional “Appalachian” way of coming together to lean on each other.

Josh Saul / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Anna Sale and Dwight Garner have several things in common - they live in New York City, they are media leaders, and they both have roots in West Virginia.

Christine Cover

Appalachia has certainly been stereotyped by many people in the media. But not all storytellers are the same, and the stories that are told about Appalachia are often complicated with layers of misunderstandings. 

It takes time, compassion and perhaps an inside perspective to delve deep and do justice to the people affected by the story. So much of this type of work- that which is reshaping how Appalachia is portrayed- is being rendered by women in the media.

WNYC

Watch Anna Sale, host of the popular podcast "Death, Sex & Money" from WNYC, and Dwight Garner, author and New York Times literary critic, as they discuss how growing up in West Virginia affects their work, as part of FestivALL Charleston. You can watch the live stream here starting at 5:30 p.m. today:

WNYC

As host and executive producer of the hit podcast "Death, Sex & Money" from WNYC, Anna Sale asks famous people and regular folks about the things we need to talk more about, but don't.

On this week's "The Front Porch," Sale talks about her complicated love of West Virginia, and the bittersweet experience of visiting home, once you know you're gone for good.

Christine Cover

Appalachia has certainly been stereotyped by many people in the media. But not all storytellers are the same, and the stories that are told about Appalachia are often complicated with layers of misunderstandings. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Kanawha-Charleston Health Department plans the release of the results of their survey that attempts to gauge the impact of the Elk River chemical spill. Sylvia Mathew Burwell faces her first Senate confirmation hearing on her way to become the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. Former West Virginia Public Broadcasting reporter Anna Sale launches a new podcast that attempts to tackle the issues we all deal with but rarely discuss. Also, Solas performs "Am I Born to Die" on thjis Mountain Stage song of the week.

Anna Sale
Amy Pearl


“Talking about death, sex, and money is not news. It’s not news to say: ‘sometimes long term relationships are hard’ or ‘sometimes it’s embarrassing when you realize you’re not earning enough money.’ That’s not a news story. As a result, when we hear those stories, it’s often in the first paragraph in a story about health insurance coverage and then the rest of it is about policy. Or, the first paragraph in a story about tax revenues in a state, you start with someone saying ‘I’m not making as much as I used to make.’ My argument is those stories are worth their own time. It’s worth pausing and listening to what that experience is.”

--Anna Sale

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia American Water begins to the flushing process after Thursday's chemical spill at Freedom Industries, the West Virginia Legislature takes advantage of a lack of a quorum to help those in need, residents in areas outside those affect also pitch in, and WNYC's (and former West Virginia Public Broadcasting reporter) Anna Sale asks an important question: What does West Virginia have to do to get your attention?