Abortion

On this West Virginia Morning, we learn about a family-owned Black newspaper in Virginia that just celebrated its 80th anniversary. The publisher, Claudia Whitworth, is rejecting the idea that people only want to hear negative stories. Also, in this show, we hear an excerpt from the latest episode of Us & Them exploring whether the topic of abortion has become too heavily divided to discuss differences civilly.

Updated at 5:35 p.m.

A sharply divided U.S. Supreme Court stood by its most recent abortion-rights precedent Monday, delivering a major defeat to abortion opponents who had hoped for a reversal of fortunes at the court with the addition of two new Trump-appointed justices.

By a 5-4 vote, the court struck down a Louisiana law that was virtually identical to a Texas law it invalidated just four years ago. Chief Justice John Roberts cast the fifth and decisive vote.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

West Virginia's attorney general on Thursday said a ban on elective medical procedures during the coronavirus pandemic will reduce abortions but will be upheld in an eventual legal challenge.

The executive order, which went into effect this week, mirrors directives in other Republican-controlled states that been temporarily blocked by federal judges. West Virginia's order, which doesn't explicitly include abortion, says that it applies to all procedures that aren't “immediately medically necessary to preserve the patient's life or long-term health” to preserve medical supplies and protective equipment.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Gov. Jim Justice has signed into law a controversial bill that would force doctors to use “reasonable medical judgement” in the event of an unsuccesful abortion. The new law, which has been taken up by other red state legislatures in recent years, has been seen as largely symbolic — considering laws protecting newborns are already on the books. 

The House of Delegates passed a bill known as the Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act. It calls on doctors to use "reasonable medical judgement" in the event of an unsuccessful abortion, and it passed with bi-partisan support.

West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia House Health and Human Resources Committee has advanced a bill that would ensure medical care for a fetus born alive following an ineffective abortion. 

House Bill 4007 is known as the Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act. The measure would direct physicians to exercise “reasonable medical judgement” should a fetus be alive following an abortion. 

Us & Them: Abortion Divides

Nov 27, 2019

Do you disagree with any of your close friends or family members about abortion? When’s the last time you actually talked about it? For many of us, the abortion debate defines Us & Them and sometimes, we feel it better to avoid the subject altogether.

Recently, several states have enacted laws restricting access to abortion services. Some states have signed laws banning the proceedure and next year, the U.S. Supreme Court hears a case that could change the right to legal abortion.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, abortion can be a hot button topic to avoid around the Thanksgiving table. But it’s a key issue at the heart of a highly polarized political climate. Several states now have abortion restrictions in place. Some states have signed abortion bans, but those aren’t in effect yet. And next year, the U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to hear a case that could change the right to legal abortion.

WVPB Graphic Illustration

Separate constitutional measures on West Virginia's Nov. 6 ballot would allow lawmakers to restrict or ban tax-payer funded abortions and have some control over the state judiciary's budget.

West Virginia Legislative Services

Voters in November will decide on a resolution that would effectively strip the constitutional right to have an abortion in West Virginia.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate has adopted a resolution that says the state constitution grants no right to an abortion or the funding of the procedure.

On The Legislature Today, Governor Jim Justice held a press conference addressing issues linked to PEIA and teacher pay. In the Senate, lawmakers debated abortion rights, and in the House, tempers flared as the 2018 state Legislative session hit the half-way mark.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

An amendment that would create exclusions to a resolution that grants no right to an abortion failed Thursday on the West Virginia Senate floor.

Sen. Corey Palumbo, a Democrat, offered an amendment to Senate Joint Resolution 12 that would have created an exception and allowed the right to an abortion in “the case of rape, incest or medical necessity.”

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate has voted against revising a proposed state constitutional amendment that would authorize lawmakers to restrict abortion rights.

The resolution advanced by the Senate Judiciary Committee would require two-thirds passage by both the Senate and House and a voter referendum to take effect.

On The Legislature Today, we take a closer look at state lawmakers’ efforts toward addressing child sexual abuse in West Virginia. Host Andrea Lannom has an in-depth discussion on the issue with a member of the West Virginia Task Force on Child Sexual Abuse – Emily Chittenden-Laird, Executive Director of the West Virginia Child Advocacy Network.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated: Monday, February 5, 2018 at 3:44 p.m.

 

The House of Delegates held a public hearing Monday on a bill that would remove abortion from a list of Medicaid services.

The House Judiciary Committee heard comments on House Bill 4012, which would eliminate taxpayer funding for medically necessary abortions unless the mother’s life is in danger.

On The Legislature Today, we hear two very different perspectives on budget policy. As lawmakers continue holding budget presentations for state agencies and continue to grapple with how and where to spend state dollars, we’ve asked the directors of two West Virginia policy research organizations – with very different philosophies – to join host Andrea Lannom and offer us all something to think about. Garrett Ballengee is the Executive Director of the Cardinal Institute for West Virginia Policy and Ted Boettner is the Executive Director of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill that would remove Medicaid funding for medically necessary abortions has been drawing a lot of attention in the House since passing through that chamber’s Health Committee last week. While the issue is inherently divisive, many questions about House Bill 4012’s constitutionality have been raised -- further drawing attention to the matter.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

House and Senate lawmakers introduced 28 joint resolutions in just the first week of the legislative session each calling for amendments to the state constitution. Some around the Capitol say such a number feels like a lot, while others say it’s rather normal. What is agreed upon, though, is that it is rare to have so many proposed constitutional amendments gaining traction this early in the session.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Gov. Jim Justice has signed a law ending a doctor's ability to waive the legal requirement to notify parents of an underage daughter's abortion.

It allows only a judge to waive parental notification.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Senators have approved a House bill that clarifies the state’s telemedicine laws, but also creates a new restriction for certain treatments.

House Bill 2509 makes it clear that doctors can treat certain diseases in minors or adults who are still enrolled in public school. 

House of Delegates
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photograhy

The West Virginia House has voted to revise the legal requirement to notify parents of an underage daughter's abortion.

Under the current law, a physician other than the doctor performing the procedure can waive the requirement by finding the minor is mature enough to decide independently or that notification wouldn't be in her best interest.

Adobe Stock

The House Republican health care proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act could have a profound impact on women’s health care coverage.

The ACA reformed several insurance provisions that affect women, including requiring coverage of no-cost birth control, not allowing insurance companies to charge women more than men and expanding coverage of pre-pregnancy care. Changes to these provisions would impact all women, but especially low-income women.

On The Legislature Today, during his State of the State Address, Gov. Jim Justice presented lawmakers with two plans.

The first was a way to balance the 2018 budget. The second, was a plan to raise more than $1 billion for road construction in the state through a road bond. Since, Justice has been traveling the state promoting that bond plan, but lawmakers have taken little action.

Secretary of the Department of Transportation Tom Smith discusses the proposal and whether Justice has given up on the push for new road funding.

Dona Wells walked through what’s left of the EMW Women’s Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky. Boxes fill what use to be offices. Sterilized medical supplies are in disarray. A light flickers on and off in the back hallway. She doesn’t see a point in fixing it. At 75, she still runs 25 miles a week, but Wells is tired.

“I was going to retire anyway, probably this year,” she said. But I wanted to do it on my terms, not Gov. Bevin’s terms.”

1 in 3 Campaign via Facebook

A national reproductive health advocacy group is stopping in Charleston today to increase local conversation about abortion.

One in three women have an abortion in their lifetime, according to the group Advocates for Youth who is hosting a campaign by the same name.

Charleston its sixth stop on the 1 in 3 Campaign is nationwide tour. The tour includes stops in states with some of the strictest abortion laws in the country.

West Virginia advocates will gather tonight at the union building at 9 and at the Capitol at 10 after Live at the Levee to host a lightshow.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Members of the House of Delegates passed a bill that would ban a commonly used second-trimester abortion method.

Senate Bill 10 passed 86 to 13  in the House Monday. 

This bill bans dilation and evacuation, or D&E, abortions. It allows those procedures to take place, however, in cases of medical emergencies. Some OBGYNs have testified before lawmakers that the bill takes away one of the safest options for women and interferes with the doctor-patient relationship.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Members of the House will vote on a bill Monday that would ban a commonly used second-trimester abortion method.

The Legislature Today
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Del. Mick Bates of Raleigh County discussed his party's proposals in the House to increase road funding. Those proposals have failed so far this session, but now Bates and other members of the House are waiting to see what Senators will do with a bi-partisan bill that would increase some fees in order to generate revenue.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the House of Delegates is beginning work on a bill that would ban a common abortion method.


Pages