West Virginia Morning

Weekdays at 7:43 a.m.

Whether it's important news events, interesting features about people and places, the latest in environmental news, stories about education or the economy, West Virginia Public Broadcasting's team of experienced reporters bring listeners in-depth stories and interviews from around the state.    

Subscribe to the podcast below and never miss an episode. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, in rural Appalachia, if you face homelessness, it can be challenging to find resources to help get back on your feet.

A pastor in St. Albans, Kanawha County, saw that a homeless encampment consisting of about 10 tents in his community was being pushed out. People were being told they had to leave. So, he decided to help.

But not everyone in the town approves of the work he’s doing.

Independent producer Kyle Vass spent some time this summer looking into what’s been happening with the “tent city.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Republican candidates in West Virginia’s 2020 congressional races appear to be significantly out-fundraising Democrats, according to third quarter campaign finance reports. Dave Mistich has more.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Dr. Steven Paine serves as West Virginia’s 31st state superintendent.

When asked what he’s most excited about in education spheres throughout the state, he says there are promising indications of improved student academic achievement, and he points to the state’s impressive graduation rates. He also highlights the career and technical education programs throughout the state. 

Education reporter Glynis Board spoke with Paine in depth about these and other issues. We hear some of that conversation.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we can learn a lot from the natural world -- things our ancestors knew that many of us have forgotten. A program in Pocahontas County wants to teach about those things -- and use nature as a classroom as well. Eric Douglas has the story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, some Ohio Valley farmers are reaping their first hemp harvest since federal law changed to legalize hemp. With some 27,000 acres under production in the region, hemp is booming. But it remains a risky crop, with uncertainty about markets, growing practices, and concern that larger players might squeeze out small growers.

The Ohio Valley ReSource’s Liam Niemeyer reports some hemp farmers are forming new cooperatives to reduce that risk and protect small farmers.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Inside Appalachia is looking at some of the ways artists are challenging stereotypes in Appalachia in a new episode out today. People on the outside looking in often misunderstand Appalachia’s cultural ways and traditions. This may come as a surprise, but those same attitudes are often leveled at people from the Middle East.

Eric Douglas brings us the story of a podcast that wants to connect the people of Appalachia and those of the Arabic World.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from WVPB’s podcast Us & Them. Host Trey Kay speaks with journalist Timothy Pratt, who produced an investigative series for 100 Days in Appalachia about undocumented seasonal workers who’ve struggled to recover from Hurricane Florence. That storm hit the Carolina coast in the fall of 2018.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, it’s been a year since the Paloma Crisis Stabilization and Detox Center opened in Martinsburg. The facility offers in-patient, or overnight services for people suffering from substance use disorder. As Liz McCormick reports, the launch of the new facility hit some bumps in the beginning, but it’s remained open and helps many find recovery.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the U.S. Department of Labor recently announced nearly $5 million dollars for worker training programs in Appalachia. It’s the latest influx of funding aimed at blunting the job losses in the region’s coal sector. But critics of those programs say worker training alone is no solution. The Ohio Valley ReSource’s Becca Schimmel reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Charleston hosted the annual West Virginia Book Festival during the weekend. Organizers estimate the event draws between 3,000 to 5,000 attendees each year.

But some would-be attendees promised not to show up and others came to protest this year. Emily Allen has more about the event and the conservative sci-fi author in this year’s speaker line up, Orson Scott Card, whose presence created the stir.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, growing up in poverty makes it difficult to access good opportunities and to succeed in our society. But when you live in an area of concentrated poverty, the struggles intensify. That’s according to new information from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Eric Douglas brings us the story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the best-selling author of all time will be at the West Virginia Book Festival this weekend. James Patterson has sold more than 100 million books. He told Eric Douglas by phone he will be telling stories, but he also has a greater purpose.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, author Crystal Wilkinson is this year’s Appalachian Heritage Writer-in-Residence at Shepherd University.

Wilkinson grew up in Kentucky with her grandparents. Her work celebrates being black in Appalachia. Liz McCormick spoke to Wilkinson last week. Here’s an excerpt from the interview beginning with Wilkinson sharing one of her short stories from her book, "Blackberries, Blackberries".

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, communities along the Tug Fork River in Mingo County are touting their waterway as a draw for outdoor recreational events. But there’s still a lot of work to be done in the river, to make sure it’s safe and clean. 

Emily Allen joined a group of volunteers and state workers yesterday [Monday] as they removed hundreds of old tires from the river.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as the Ohio Valley’s coal industry continues to decline, many coal-dependent communities are left asking, ‘What’s next?’

For some, a different kind of natural resource could be the key. Energy and environment reporter Brittany Patterson visited one community in southwest Virginia that is betting big on outdoor recreation – and getting some help from an unusual local resident.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, at least two organizations in West Virginia specialize in bringing medical care to those without housing. Corey Knollinger followed one of those organizations on their weekly street rounds in the Northern Panhandle to find out how nurses and doctors interact with those who are experiencing homelessness.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a website that brings local history to life is expanding, thanks to a hefty grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Emily Allen visited Marshall University in Huntington, where the program was developed, and learned about some of the town’s culture and history, silently embedded in structures left behind and often overlooked.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a growing body of research shows that learning outside boosts the mental, physical and social health of students. In Morgantown, one outdoor education program has embraced learning in nature and integrated it into the curriculum at a local elementary school. As part of our occasional series on outdoor education, Brittany Patterson visited Mountain SOL.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In the latest episode of Inside Appalachia, we hear how the opioid crisis is reshaping life in some Appalachian communities, and why people across our region are calling for new approaches to care for babies who are exposed to opioids in the womb, and their mothers. Our assistant news director, Glynis Board, guest-hosts this episode. On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear the first part of Inside Appalachia’s show.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, not many high schools can say they operate an award-winning recycling program for their county. Much less do you hear this from smaller schools in rural counties.

But Wyoming East High School, a school of about 500 students in Wyoming County, has just that. As part of a new occasional series exploring outdoor learning, reporter Emily Allen spoke to the EPA-honored science teacher who helped make the effort possible.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Shepherd University’s campus library is home to the largest solar panel installation on a nonprofit in West Virginia. As Liz McCormick reports, the staff who pushed for the installation are hopeful the achievement will inspire more organizations and homeowners in the state to turn to solar power.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Appalachia’s coal country is struggling to diversify its local economies amid the sharp declines in employment at mines and power plants. An eastern Kentucky organization called SOAR, or “Shaping Our Appalachian Region,” is trying to help.

The group is betting big on high-speed internet and industrial development. But as the Ohio Valley ReSource’s Sydney Boles reports, those are proving tough items to deliver in the rural, coal mining region.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Purdue Pharma, manufacturer of the opioid drug OxyContin, said it reached a tentative deal last week that would settle some of the thousands of lawsuits brought against them by state and local governments in the wake of the opioid crisis. But the company now says it will delcare bankruptcy in the face of their potential legal liability.

As Kara Lofton reports, some are arguing any money recovered from Purdue and other defendents shouldn’t go to state governments. Instead, they say it should go directly to providers and hospitals.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, many farmers wage a never-ending battle with weeds. “Pigweed” or as folks in Arkansas call it “Satan’s Weed” -- is one of the hardest to get rid of. 

Farmers across the nation are divided over the use of the controversial herbicide called Dicamba. The chemical has the tendency to drift and damage nearby crops and plants.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Us & Them host Trey Kay and his colleague Loretta Williams have been following the issue with their developing story called “Farm Wars.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

We have a very musical West Virginia Morning for you. We’ll hear from singers in Oregon, a pop musician from the Northern Panhandle, and fiddlers in Clay County who have been handing down old-time music for a long time.

First up, get your popcorn ready — this Saturday evening, you can watch our new documentary, In Tune, about the old-time music community in West Virginia.

As Roxy Todd reports, one of the musicians in the film is teaching traditional music to the next generation through the West Virginia Humanities Council’s Folklife Apprenticeship program.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear a two-part story from Report for America corps member Emily Allen. The small southern West Virginia town of Kermit has had more than its fair share of national headlines, especially when it comes to the town’s struggle with the opioid crisis. 

But few stories focus on the people themselves. Emily visited Kermit earlier this summer to hear from several residents, and what they think the town needs to emerge from that struggle.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, if you live in or have ever been to Morgantown, West Virginia, you’ve probably driven over or near the Monongahela River -- or, as some people pronounce it, Mononga-HAY-la. 

So, which is the correct way to say it? And where does the name come from, anyway?

On a recent episode of Inside Appalachia, guest host Glynis Board explains -- in our series called “What’s in a Name.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, more than 200 mines are idled or not producing coal across central Appalachia. About half of them have been that way for three or more years, avoiding regulatory requirements for mine cleanup.

The Ohio Valley ReSource partnered with the Center for Public Integrity to learn more about how mine operators capitalize on this regulatory loophole.

In the second of two reports, energy and environment reporter Brittany Patterson introduces us to a resident who lives below a coal mine that has been idled for years.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, more than 200 coal mines sit idle across central Appalachia. They have not produced coal for years. Those idled mines occupy a gray area in the regulations on mine cleanup and reclamation.

The Ohio Valley ReSource partnered with the Center for Public Integrity to learn more about how mine operators use a regulatory loophole. In the first of two reports, Brittany Patterson visited one such mine to see the effects on the neighboring community.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, video games can help who have disabilities feel more included and accepted among their peers in social circles. But not everyone with a disability can play video games with a traditional controller. As Liz McCormick reports, one nonprofit organization in Kearneysville, West Virginia, has been trying to change that.

Pages