West Virginia Morning

Weekdays at 7:43 a.m.

Whether it's important news events, interesting features about people and places, the latest in environmental news, stories about education or the economy, West Virginia Public Broadcasting's team of experienced reporters bring listeners in-depth stories and interviews from around the state.    

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On this West Virginia Morning, ever wonder what it would be like to fly in a small plane around West Virginia? We hear another story about West Virginia’s airplane industry and its remaining airfields. Also, in this show, we hear more about an unregulated landfill near South Charleston, Kanawha County that has been polluting a creek in the area for decades.

On this West Virginia Morning, a Wheeling-based artist is on the road to recovery after being diagnosed with the coronavirus. We hear about his experience. Also, in this show, we hear about the first graduation from a new family treatment court in West Virginia, and we learn about West Virginia’s fifth major export – airplane parts.

On this West Virginia Morning, should we be worried about our kids and grandkids catching COVID-19? The short answer, according to experts, is it’s unclear. We get into the long answer of this question in this show. Also, we hear local reports in government and energy, and we learn about some natural springs in Southwest Virginia that may not be as clean as residents thought.

On this West Virginia Morning, we learn about some new training police in the Eastern Panhandle recently received in de-escalation, racial profiling and implicit bias. Also, in this show, we speak with longtime community leader Ron Scott Jr. who founded and directs the Ohio Valley African American Student Association in the Northern Panhandle.

On this West Virginia Morning, we learn about West Virginia’s only World War I flying ace. Also, in this show, we learn about an unregulated landfill near South Charleston, Kanawha County and we bring this you week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

On this West Virginia Morning, the coronavirus pandemic has led to a steep drop in standard immunizations. We explore the local and national conversation surrounding vaccines. Also, in this show, we hear how one state in the Ohio Valley region is trying to increase coronavirus testing access.

On this West Virginia Morning, in the wake of COVID-19, many city dwellers in New York and elsewhere have found themselves rethinking housing situations – especially now, if they can suddenly work from home. Also, in this show, we hear a report on the recent endorsement by the United Mine Workers of America for Ben Salango for West Virginia’s governor.

On this West Virginia Morning, we remember and celebrate two individuals and the important messages they leave behind. Also, in this show, we bring you the latest coronavirus news in West Virginia.

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore a couple contentious topics. We look at the impacts of Confederate monuments standing in our region, and we hear a report on Universal Basic Income and whether it could be one answer as residents in West Virginia experience unemployment due to the coronavirus pandemic.

On this West Virginia Morning, we remember flying over Appalachia with an audio postcard featuring voices of aviators from the region. Also, in this show, we hear a conversation with Appalachian Literature professors Katherine Ledford and Theresa Lloyd, and we listen to this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

On this West Virginia Morning, we talk a little bit about the coronavirus’ impact on health insurance and foster families. Also, in this show, we hear from an author and entrepreneur who is working to ensure Black authors’ voices are heard.

On this West Virginia Morning, Secretary of State Mac Warner announced some voting policies this week in the run up to the general election in November. Specifically, voters will have to ask for an absentee ballot application instead of automatically receiving one in the mail. Also, in this show, we hear a report on a small, failing water utility in Fayette County.

On this West Virginia Morning, we revisit Kermit, West Virginia and reflect on how millions of opioids could flood a town of 350 people. Also, in this show, it’s been one year since the two-month long Blackjewel protest. We look back at what it meant and its impact.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from a girl in Appalachia who’s bucking some trends and embracing old traditions in the process. Also, in this show, we hear how a recent arrest of the Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives could impact future energy policy throughout the region.

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll learn about a project called Black in Appalachia, which is about to launch a new podcast. The show’s creators hope it empowers the region’s Black youth. We also bring you this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

On this West Virginia Morning, we consider the challenges colleges and universities are facing as the fall semester approaches. Also, in this show, we visit Kermit in Mingo County. About ten years ago, this small town of about 350 people saw a flood of pain pills enter the community and devastate many people’s lives.

On this West Virginia Morning, while the coronavirus pandemic rages on, so does climate change. Some researchers say planting native species in our backyard is a step in the right direction. Also, in this show, we hear reports from around the state on challenges facing our region to provide adequate health care for both hospital access and those in recovery.

On this West Virginia Morning, the traditional start of the school year is coming like a freight train, and educational leaders are trying to prepare for the unknown. We hear from West Virginia Superintendent of Schools Clayton Burch and other officials. Also, in this show, we hear a story about efforts to save an endangered plant in Appalachia.

On this West Virginia Morning, residents in Southern West Virginia got together this weekend for some “drive-in” professional wrestling. Also, in this show, we have updates on the spread of the coronavirus throughout our region, and we remember West Virginian Wade Shaffer who died last month from COVID-19.

On this West Virginia Morning, we revisit a story from an award-winning episode of our podcast Inside Appalachia that explores the challenges of being a new mom while balancing work and family. Also, in this show, we hear this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week brought to us by Charlie Hunter and Lucy Woodward.

On this West Virginia Morning, calling all geo-nerds! Earlier this week, we learned a little about Karst Topography in our region, and now we learn a little more. Also, in this show, we hear a report about a new proposed climate plan presented by presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, and we hear a conversation with author William Jolliff about his new book called “Heeding The Call: A Study of Denise Giardina’s Novels.”

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore the question on many minds: what will happen with school this fall? West Virginia Public Broadcasting is asking questions and reflecting on student experiences this past spring.

On this West Virginia Morning, we learn about Karst Topography, which makes up parts of the Mountain State. Also, in this show, we hear updates on West Virginia’s special mine reclamation fund and efforts by the West Virginia House of Delegates to call a special session. We also hear from a former acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who discusses the importance of face masks.

On this West Virginia Morning, the coronavirus pandemic has kept many people who would otherwise gather, away from one another including a group that takes part in shape-note singing. Also, in this show, we hear a conversation with an epidemiologist in Monongalia County who speaks to the county’s recent spike in coronavirus case numbers and how to tackle further spread.

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll learn about the name of the town of Odd, West Virginia in Raleigh County. Also, in this show, we hear a conversation with a professor in Appalachia who works to lift the voices of LGBTQ authors in rural spaces, and we hear this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week brought to us by the John Pizzarelli Trio.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from a pediatrician who weighs in on whether children should return to public school in the fall. Also, in this show, we hear an excerpt from the latest episode of Us & Them about the challenges of receiving mental health care during the coronavirus pandemic.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from Dr. Cathy Slemp, who was recently ousted from her position as the state’s top public health official. Also, in this show, we hear a report from Marshall University as the school voted to remove the name of a Confederate soldier from a campus building; we hear about a settlement paid to a Black woman from Charleston who was forcefully arrested last year, and we hear from author Jordan Farmer on his new book Poison Flood.

On this West Virginia Morning, Gov. Jim Justice has ordered the wearing of face masks inside public buildings in West Virginia. Also, in this show, a middle school on Charleston’s west side will change its name after the Kanawha County Board of Education voted unanimously to remove an association with Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, and we hear a story about modern dance from our Appalachia Folkways Project.

On this West Virginia Morning, Dave Mistich speaks with Report for America fellow Chris Jones about his recent story looking at and defining two movements: Antifa and Boogaloo Boys. Also, in this show, we remember Vietnam veteran Dave Evans who touched the lives of not just West Virginians, but many people around the world. Evans spent his life after the military helping those ravaged by war. We also hear an interview with a man who worked to tackle challenges faced by Charleston, West Virginia’s Black community during a time when some say urban renewal forced many Black residents in the city to leave their neighborhood.

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an update from Gov. Jim Justice who is warning of mandating face masks in public. Also, in this show, we hear how colleges and universities in the state are reacting to financial challenges brought on by COVID-19; we hear the latest on the unprecedented numbers of unemployment claims in the region; we hear about a federal spending bill that may help improve infrastructure in coal-reliant communities, and we hear this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

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