Recovery

 

RECOVERY from substance use disorder is possible, and help is available -
West Virginia Public Broadcasting launches new focus

 

We’ve read the staggering statistics, but more tragically we’ve seen, and many have experienced, the human devastation caused by substance use disorder.

We’ve met incredibly inspiring West Virginians living in recovery -  and the healthcare professionals, family members, friends, first responders, law officers, social service agencies, employers, and engaged citizens who have supported them along the way.

We want to share their stories – their reflections, their messages, their hopes, relapses and successes - and convene meaningful dialogue.

WVPB has gathered a group of some of the most active professionals addressing West Virginia’s opioid crisis, who have helped us identify and shape our Recovery focus. Together we'll be sponsoring community events across the state, and spreading the message that help is available by calling the toll free number 1-844-HELP4WV.

Explore this Youtube playlist of Recovery stories 

West Virginia Public Broadcasting believes through community engagement it can play a role in fostering a better understanding of substance use disorder, breaking down stigma, helping West Virginia communities become more proficient at prevention, encouraging treatment, and supporting recovery.

Understanding and compassion are key.

Prescription drug wholesalers, who sit between pharmaceutical manufacturers and health care providers, are expected to get an earful about their role in the opioid epidemic Tuesday. Executives from five companies will testify in front of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

courtesy Partnership for Appalachian Girls' Education

Our region has challenges, from the economic decline of the coal industry, to the opioid epidemic, there’s work to do in our communities. In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll hear from several people who are trying to reinvigorate our region with opportunities for change. We’ll also hear from some younger voices in Appalachian, North Carolina about growing up in the mountains.

 


Adobe Stock

Senator Joe Manchin’s office released a report today that found in 2016, the economic cost of the opioid epidemic in West Virginia was more than 8.7 billion dollars.

Nationwide, the economic cost of the opioid crisis is more than 500 billion, according to a 2017 report from the Council for Economic Advisors.  The brief from Manchin’s office relied heavily on the CEA report to draw conclusions about the financial impact on West Virginia.

As the United States works through what the American Medical Association describes as “the worst drug addiction epidemic in its history,” we revisit the story of Dimitri. This former junkie was delivered from a 27-year heroin addiction by a controversial treatment that seems to work miracles for people addicted to opioids.

Prescriptions, Pills, Drugs, Prescription
U.S. Air Force

Drugmakers would be required to identify the legitimate need for controlled substances to justify their production under a proposed rule intended to rein in the diversion of drugs for illicit purposes.

The Drug Enforcement Administration announced the proposed rule change Tuesday.

Drugs, Drug abuse, Drug overdose, overdose
Pixabay

Cabell County is leading West Virginia in the number of fatal overdoses for the second year in a row.

Citing state data, the Charleston Gazette-Mail reports 909 people died of drug overdoses in West Virginia in 2017, an increase from the previous record of 887, set in 2016. Overdose deaths seemed to slow during late 2017, though the state Health Statistics Center says that could be due to reporting delays.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Kentucky ranks in the top five highest number of drug overdoses in the country. It also has one of the highest of Hepatitis C, and while HIV/AIDS cases are declining the U.S., Kentucky holds steady with new cases. Much of this can be traced back to people who use IV drugs, using needles or syringes to inject opioids.

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