All Things Considered

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All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa ChangAudie CornishMary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

With coronavirus cases continuing to climb and hospitals facing the prospect of having to decide how to allocate limited staff and resources, the Department of Health and Human Services is reminding states and health care providers that civil rights laws still apply in a pandemic.

States are preparing for a situation when there's not enough care to go around by issuing "crisis of care" standards.

But disability groups are worried that those standards will allow rationing decisions that exclude the elderly or people with disabilities.

In Berlin, reminders of the city's violent past are everywhere. Somber monuments, museums, stumbling stones and plaques dot nearly every block. "Germany is seen around the world as a model for how a country can face its past — and it has done that in a way few countries have," says journalist James Angelos.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

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7 hours ago

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

Last month, Habibi released Anywhere But Here, the band's first full-length album since its self-titled debut in 2014. Just like that first record and the EPs and singles over the past six years, the new album is full of Habibi's signature mix of psychedelic rock and Iranian music.

Hippos can get hungry. Very hungry. So when zoos shut their doors to the public because of the coronavirus, zookeepers keep showing up to work to make sure everyone is fed.

Jenna Wingate feeds Fiona, the Cincinnati Zoo's 3-year-old, 1,300-pound hippo. Fiona was born premature, and Wingate has been looking after her since two hours after she was born.

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7 hours ago

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

Most of the gargantuan sum of money in the coronavirus bill Congress just passed is dealing with the economic crisis, not the public health one.

"Most of the bill is on emergency relief to people and unemployment insurance," says Loren Adler, associate director of USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy. "The health care provisions are, in some sense, secondary."

A host of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour takes a look at how the coronavirus is affecting cultural production — and offers some recommendations for home entertainment.

NPR's business correspondent addresses listener concerns about retail workers and talks about about best practices for consumers as the coronavirus epidemic worsens.

NPR's business correspondent answers listener questions about economic sectors that are booming, working in retail and supporting small businesses in the middle of the coronavirus emergency.

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Dr. Brent Russell, an emergency room doctor in Ketchum, Idaho, about how he became ill with COVID-19 and his subsequent recovery from the disease.

NPR congressional reporter Kelsey Snell and physician Dr. Abraar Karan answer listener questions about the relief bill signed into law Friday and about the latest measures combating the coronavirus.

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Widespread testing and contact tracing has allowed China to begin to relax its social distancing measures, and testing is credited with helping South Korea flatten its curve.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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Spring is usually the start of the planting season, but with the coronavirus pandemic spreading, farms and farmworkers are having a tough time. Here's Sarah Gonzalez with our Planet Money podcast.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill contains a lot of help for a lot of industries, but what's in there for health care? NPR health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin gives us the highlights.

SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN, BYLINE: Most of that gargantuan sum of money is dealing with the economic crisis here, not the public health one, going to things like emergency relief for various industries, unemployment insurance and the like. For health, the biggest-ticket item is $100 billion for hospitals and health care providers.

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The nation's 15 days of social distancing are nearly over. And while many states have issued stay-at-home orders for much longer periods of time, new guidance from the White House coronavirus task force is due soon.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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